Article

Evaluation of Different Concentrations And Frequency of Foliar Application of Moringa Extract on Growth & Yield of Onion, Allium cepa Lam

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Abstract

Field trials were conducted between 2010/11 and 2011/12 at the Forestry Research Institute of Nigeria (FRIN) of Federal College of Forestry Mechanization Afaka, Kaduna experimental site, 10o 031N, 07o 211 E and 644m above sea level in the Northern guinea savanna agro-ecological zone during 2011 to 2012 dry season. The objective was to evaluate the effect of different concentration and frequency of foliar application of Moringa extract on growth and yield of Onion (Allium cepa Lam). Fresh Moringa oleifera shoots were obtained from experimental site of the College when it was 35 days old, air dried for some days and crushed with water (10kg of dry material in water) in a household blender for 10 minute. The solution was filtered through a filter paper (Whattman No 42) and the liquid extracts obtained were diluted with water to produce the treatments. The treatments consisted of four concentration 2% (1 litre of extract/50 litre of water), 4% (1 litre of extract/25 litre of water), 3.2% (litre of extract/31 litre of water), 3.7% (1 litre of extract/27 litre of water) and a control (no extract) and two frequency of foliar application once (3weeks) and twice 3 and 6 weeks after transplanting. The trial was laid in a Randomized Complete Block Design(RCBD) and replicated three times. Data were collected on number of leaves/plant, plant height and crop vigour score at 5, 7 and 9 WAT. The data collected were subjected to analysis of variance. Result obtained showed a significant (P = 0.05) effect of the treatments on the characters measured with moringa extract concentration ratio of 1:2 (50%) and frequency periods of foliar application at 3, and 6 weeks after transplanting manifesting the highest effect. Based on the result, application of Moringa extract concentration ratio of 1:2(50%) and frequency period of foliar application at 3, and 6 weeks after transplanting of onion should be adopted for use in Northern guinea savannah ecological zone on the variety of onion tested, since it is easier to get Moringa all year round and in large quantities for large hectare of farm land.

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... The optimal nutrient of Singgalang cabagge was observed in 3% Moringa extract application (Figure 1 and Figure 2). According to Mohammed et al. 19 Moringa leaf extract could increase the mineral and carbohydrate content of shallot bulbs compared to untreated (control) plants. Hala, Abou and Nabila 20 reported that pepper plants treated with 4% Moringa extract had higher vitamin C, carbohydrates, K and Ca content than other treatment. ...
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... Effect of different plant extracts on plant growth regulation and stress tolerance has been already reported in literature (Farooq et al. 2017;Santaniello et al. 2017;Shukla et al. 2018). Positive effect of foliar application of Moringa oleifera extract on growth and yield of Allium cepa Lam was reported by Mohammed et al. (2013). Okunlola and Ofuya (2013) reported that the Azadirachta indica and Piper guineense extracts enhanced the growth and yield of jute (Corchorus olitorius L.). ...
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Emphasis tends towards cool temperate agriculture but, where appropriate, illustrative examples from warm temperate, tropical and arid climatic regions are given. The text is divided into three sections: Chapters 1-4 examine how the plant uses the basic resources of energy, water and minerals, and how it derives its structural strength and preserves its integrity; Chapters 5-10 deal with the growth and development of the plant from seed to maturity, including propagation and breeding. Chapters 11 and 12 focus on plants as crops, looking in turn at yield and the quality of its produce as food. Each chapter is largely self-contained, having its own summary. -after Authors
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The effect of indole-3-acetic acid (10−4 and 10−5 M), gibberellic acid (10−4 and 10−5 M) and ethephon (50 ppm) as an ethylene releasing compound, on the diosgenin synthesis and/or accumulation process and their effects on the growth of Trigonella foenum-graecum plants were investigated. Treatment with 10−5 and 10−4 M gibberellic acid led to 43 and 19% increases, respectively, of diosgenin in 30-day-old whole plants. These increases might be associated with the action that this growth regulator has in stimulating plant growth and the biosynthetic pathway of this sapogenin. A smaller increase was obtained with the 10−5 M indole-3-acetic acid treatment (6%, in 30 day-old plants), probably due to a stimulation of the biosynthetic pathway, alone, since no effect on growth was observed. Treatment with 50 ppm ethephon increased the diosgenin levels observed in the leaves of 15- and 30-day-old plants, growth of the whole plant being substantially reduced at 30 days in comparison with the growth observed in control plants. These figures reflect a 77% increase in diosgenin levels in 15-day-old plants and a decrease of 68% in 30-day-old plants.
Article
The leaf-area index (leaf area per unit area of land, L) of field crops of kale and sugar-beet was varied experimentally by removing different fractions of the plant population distributed uniformly through the crop. The net assimilation rate (E) was determined in subsequent periods of 10–14 days. For kale, E decreased nearly linearly with increase of L throughout the range from I to 5. E of sugar-beet was less affected by change in L and was apparently not decreased until L rose above about 3. Because of this dependence of E on L, the rate of dry-matter production per unit area of land, or crop growth-rate (C=EL), showed a curved relation to L; for kale it increased to a maximum when L was between 3 and 4 and fell again at higher values of L. Maximal C for sugar-beet occurred beyond the range of L tested, probably between L=6 and L=9. This optimal L for dry-matter production by sugar-beet crops probably lies near the upper limit of the current agricultural range, so there is little, if any, scope for increasing the dry-matter yield by further increase in L. For heavy kale crops L is already far in excess of the optimum, and it may be possible to increase the total dry-matter yield of kale by repeated thinning or defoliation to hold L near the optimum.
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The Moringa Three. ECHO 17391, Durance Rd, North ft
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Effect of Gibberellic acid on growth and yield fluted pumpkinpkin. Telfaria occidentalis. (HOOKE) Being paper presented on 27th conference of Horticultural society of Nigeria, conference held at Royal Tropicana Hotel
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Manga, A. A and Hussaini, M. A. (2009). Effect of Gibberellic acid on growth and yield fluted pumpkinpkin. Telfaria occidentalis. (HOOKE) Being paper presented on 27th conference of Horticultural society of Nigeria, conference held at Royal Tropicana Hotel, Kano, from 11-16 October 2009. 55-56.
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