Article

Effects of medium chain triglyceride on insulin resistance in type 2 diabetes mellitus

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Abstract

Objective: To observe the effects of medium chain triglyceride (MCT) on insulin resistance in type 2 diabetes mellitus. Methods: With long chain triglyceride (LCT) as control, patients were divided into three groups based on their oil intakes; MCT group (100% MCT oil), MCT/LCT group (50% MCT oil + 50% LCT oil), and LCT group (100% LCT oil). Oils were taken daily for 3 months. The total energy and fat consumptions were controlled. The blood levels of fasting plasma glucose (FPG), fasting plasma insulin (FIN), C-peptide (CP), resistin, and beta hydroxybutyric acid (BHBA) at Months 0, 1.5, and 3 were measured. The mRNA express of resistin in peripheral blood mononuclear cell was also detected. Afterwards the homeostasis model assessment insulin resistance (HOMA-IR) and the quantitative insulin-sensitivity check index (QUICKI) were analyzed. Results: Compared with baseline level, FPG significantly decreased at Month 1.5 in MCT group (P = 0.042) and FIN significantly decreased at Month 3 in MCT/LCT group (P = 0.005). Compared with LCT group, FIN significantly decreased in MCT/LCT group at both Month 1.5 and 3 (P = 0.033, P = 0.006); FIN also significantly decreased in MCT group at Month 1.5 (P = 0.020). Compared with baseline level, C-peptide significantly increased in MCT group at both Month 1.5 and 3 (P < 0.001), and also increased in MCT/LCT group at Month 3 (P = 0.024). Compared with baseline level, HOMA-IR significantly decreased in MCT/LCT group at Month 3 (P = 0.021) compared with LCT group, HOMA-IR significantly decreased at Month 1.5 in both MCT/LCT and MCT groups (P = 0.033, P = 0.017). Compared with LCT group, QUICKI significandy increased in MCT/LCT group at Month 3 (P = 0.011). BHBA was not significantly different at Month 1.5 and 3 (P = 0.617, P = 0.453). Conclusion: With total energy and fat consumptions controlled, replacement of 50% dietary oil with MCT can improve insulin resistance.

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... Significant improvements were noted by these authors in the subjects given MCT compared to LCT specifically in body weight reduction and waist circumference, reduction in insulin resistance, increased concentration of serum Cpeptide and a decreased serum cholesterol level. These results were in accordance with the study by Deng et al. (2009) on the effects of MCT on insulin resistance in T2D subjects with LCT as control [33]. However, Hoeks et al. (2012) observed no significant effect on triglyceride-rich lipoprotein metabolism profile in insulin resistance subjects supplemented with MCT for six hours [34]. ...
... Significant improvements were noted by these authors in the subjects given MCT compared to LCT specifically in body weight reduction and waist circumference, reduction in insulin resistance, increased concentration of serum Cpeptide and a decreased serum cholesterol level. These results were in accordance with the study by Deng et al. (2009) on the effects of MCT on insulin resistance in T2D subjects with LCT as control [33]. However, Hoeks et al. (2012) observed no significant effect on triglyceride-rich lipoprotein metabolism profile in insulin resistance subjects supplemented with MCT for six hours [34]. ...
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