Conference Paper

Treatment of Canine Sarcoptic Mange with Fipronil Spray: A Field Trial

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Abstract

Twelve dogs naturally infested with S. scabiei were used to assess the clinical efficacy of fipronil against canine sarcoptic mange. Diagnosis was based on clinical signs, skin scrapings and/or serology. All the dogs were treated with a 0.25% fipronil spray, once weekly, for four consecutive weeks, using a total of 12 to 39 mL/kg of spray. Pruritus and skin lesions disappeared, respectively, seven to 66 days and 14-71 days after the beginning of the treatment. No relapses occurred during the three to four-month follow-up period. Three dogs were kept under observation for a further eight to 12-month period with no relapses witnessed. Of the nine dogs that had been seropositive at the beginning of the study, only two out of six were found to be seronegative when retested three to four months after the end of the treatment.

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... The disease has been reported to affect mainly the traditional goat herds, with the newly purchased animals known to serve as the main source of the contamination[2,6,7]. Dairy goat enterprises are an important part of livestock production in Greece[8]. Although sarcoptic mange is a common ectoparasitic disease in this country, affecting almost all domestic animal species and especially pigs, goats, sheep, and dogs[9][10][11], there have been no adequate epidemiological studies to address the problem among small ruminant flocks or herds. Intense pruritus, manifested over the face, pinnae, neck, limbs, or over the body and associated with the presence of papules, crusts, excoriations, and hypotrichosis-alopecia, on an erythematous or hyperpigmented, lichenified, thick, and folded skin make up the typical clinical picture of sarcoptic mange as it appears in the goat. ...
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