ArticlePDF Available

The use of diffusion theory in marketing: A qualitative approach to innovative consumer behavior

Authors:
6/19/2020 The Use of Diffusion Theory in Marketing: a Qualitative Approach to Innovative Consumer Behavior | ACR
https://www.acrwebsite.org/volumes/7230/volumes/v18/NA-18 1/20
6/19/2020 The Use of Diffusion Theory in Marketing: a Qualitative Approach to Innovative Consumer Behavior | ACR
https://www.acrwebsite.org/volumes/7230/volumes/v18/NA-18 2/20
6/19/2020 The Use of Diffusion Theory in Marketing: a Qualitative Approach to Innovative Consumer Behavior | ACR
https://www.acrwebsite.org/volumes/7230/volumes/v18/NA-18 3/20
6/19/2020 The Use of Diffusion Theory in Marketing: a Qualitative Approach to Innovative Consumer Behavior | ACR
https://www.acrwebsite.org/volumes/7230/volumes/v18/NA-18 4/20
6/19/2020 The Use of Diffusion Theory in Marketing: a Qualitative Approach to Innovative Consumer Behavior | ACR
https://www.acrwebsite.org/volumes/7230/volumes/v18/NA-18 5/20
6/19/2020 The Use of Diffusion Theory in Marketing: a Qualitative Approach to Innovative Consumer Behavior | ACR
https://www.acrwebsite.org/volumes/7230/volumes/v18/NA-18 6/20
6/19/2020 The Use of Diffusion Theory in Marketing: a Qualitative Approach to Innovative Consumer Behavior | ACR
https://www.acrwebsite.org/volumes/7230/volumes/v18/NA-18 7/20
6/19/2020 The Use of Diffusion Theory in Marketing: a Qualitative Approach to Innovative Consumer Behavior | ACR
https://www.acrwebsite.org/volumes/7230/volumes/v18/NA-18 8/20
6/19/2020 The Use of Diffusion Theory in Marketing: a Qualitative Approach to Innovative Consumer Behavior | ACR
https://www.acrwebsite.org/volumes/7230/volumes/v18/NA-18 9/20
6/19/2020 The Use of Diffusion Theory in Marketing: a Qualitative Approach to Innovative Consumer Behavior | ACR
https://www.acrwebsite.org/volumes/7230/volumes/v18/NA-18 10/20
6/19/2020 The Use of Diffusion Theory in Marketing: a Qualitative Approach to Innovative Consumer Behavior | ACR
https://www.acrwebsite.org/volumes/7230/volumes/v18/NA-18 11/20
6/19/2020 The Use of Diffusion Theory in Marketing: a Qualitative Approach to Innovative Consumer Behavior | ACR
https://www.acrwebsite.org/volumes/7230/volumes/v18/NA-18 12/20
6/19/2020 The Use of Diffusion Theory in Marketing: a Qualitative Approach to Innovative Consumer Behavior | ACR
https://www.acrwebsite.org/volumes/7230/volumes/v18/NA-18 13/20
6/19/2020 The Use of Diffusion Theory in Marketing: a Qualitative Approach to Innovative Consumer Behavior | ACR
https://www.acrwebsite.org/volumes/7230/volumes/v18/NA-18 14/20
6/19/2020 The Use of Diffusion Theory in Marketing: a Qualitative Approach to Innovative Consumer Behavior | ACR
https://www.acrwebsite.org/volumes/7230/volumes/v18/NA-18 15/20
6/19/2020 The Use of Diffusion Theory in Marketing: a Qualitative Approach to Innovative Consumer Behavior | ACR
https://www.acrwebsite.org/volumes/7230/volumes/v18/NA-18 16/20
6/19/2020 The Use of Diffusion Theory in Marketing: a Qualitative Approach to Innovative Consumer Behavior | ACR
https://www.acrwebsite.org/volumes/7230/volumes/v18/NA-18 17/20
6/19/2020 The Use of Diffusion Theory in Marketing: a Qualitative Approach to Innovative Consumer Behavior | ACR
https://www.acrwebsite.org/volumes/7230/volumes/v18/NA-18 18/20
6/19/2020 The Use of Diffusion Theory in Marketing: a Qualitative Approach to Innovative Consumer Behavior | ACR
https://www.acrwebsite.org/volumes/7230/volumes/v18/NA-18 19/20
6/19/2020 The Use of Diffusion Theory in Marketing: a Qualitative Approach to Innovative Consumer Behavior | ACR
https://www.acrwebsite.org/volumes/7230/volumes/v18/NA-18 20/20
... The final category is made up of the last 16% to adopt (as well as, presumably, non-adopters). The individuals in this category are known as laggards" (Lowrey, 1991). ...
Article
Full-text available
The problem of consumer retention is well known in marketing literature. Actually, attraction of the new customers is sometimes three times more costly than their retention-but what is the key for that? Scientific marketing literature and a lot of marketing researches at the financial services market shows that old loyalty of customers towards financial institutions is in reducing stage-is being reduced. What makes customers to come back to the bank again and again? This main research question made us make a special customer survey in the banking sector of Georgia. We made literature review too and-based on literature review the Bank Customer Retention Matrix has been established which seems to be comprehensive for the banking business in future. The data for marketing research was obtained from a convenience sample of 5 bank customers in Tbilisi, capital of Georgia. According to our hypothesis-if the decision to change the bank in the past period was a function of price, reputation, service quality, effective advertising competition, involuntary switching, distance, switching costs and demographic characteristics, in future it can be seen-observed in other factors. Convenience sample analysis and some factor studies were used to analyze the data and identify and rank the factors that impact the bank switching behavior of customers in Tbilisi, Georgia.
... (Female, Mexico). This respondent's ethical position is consistent with Lowry (1991) who found that incompatibility with values is a key factor in product nonadoption and lack of diffusion. Values that act as barriers to diffusion have also been found in the research on the diffusion of on-line banking (Fain and Roberts, 1997). ...
Article
A study was conducted to generate a greater understanding of the global phenomenon of consumers' unauthorized peer-to-peer (P2P) file-sharing of music on the Internet. Diffusion of Innovation Theory (Rogers 1983) was used to interpret global consumer perceptions of this widespread online behavior. The sample for this study included consumers from nine nations (U.S.A, Russia, Croatia, Turkey, Bulgaria, Venezuela, and Mexico). Results indicated that similarities among global values and consumer behavior on the Internet are related to Diffusion of Innovation characteristics. Global consumer values on the Internet were also found to be related to Internet lifestyle themes (Smith and Whitlark 1999), attributes of trustworthiness, and perceived risk (Huff 2000). Managerial implications and future research recommendations are provided.
... Last one is laggards, which are 16% of the market, and they refuse to use products or lately adopt them during the decline stage of cycle [6]. Marketing scholars prefer to use Rogers' adoption categorization in their studies [3,4,5]. ...
... The innovativeness in the mind of potential customers can be measured by the internal factors that trigger them to adopt new products or services. According to Rogers (1962Rogers ( , 1983 and Lowrey (1991), the factors that determine how innovative potential customers are: relative advantage of the product (customers are able to see the benefits of adopting the new products or services), compatibility (customers are able to make a comparison of the new products/services with existing ones), complexity (functions and features of the new products/services are easy to understand), divisibility (customers are able to buy a portion of the service so as to be able to check its performance) and communicability or observability (it is easy to demonstrate or describe products/services to customers). In the case of takaful, the role of agents is important, as most takaful products are marketed through direct selling. ...
Article
Purpose Insurance is a modern risk-management tool. Although the idea is novel, its practice is not free of interest, uncertainty, and elements of gambling. Takaful has been introduced as an alternative to modern insurance. India has an established insurance industry, and although the country has the second largest Muslim population in the world, takaful has not been introduced there. Moreover, no research has examined how internal forces affect policy-holders to buy new insurance products such as takaful in India. This study will examine whether internal factors influence individual insurance policy-holders to open up to takaful. Since internal factors reflect the innovative nature of policy-holders, this paper seeks to determine whether there is significant difference in the innovative nature of two independent sample groups (e.g., between Muslims and non-Muslims) in participating in takaful. Design/methodology/approach New product adoption theory is used in developing the hypotheses and a questionnaire. Snowball sampling method is used in this survey, with a sample size of 909 respondents, including Muslim and non-Muslim policy-holders. The internal forces that encourage potential policy-holders to participate in takaful is the independent variable here; while as the respondents’ actual willingness to participate in takaful is the dependent variable. Religion and level of education are used as control variables and regression and T-tests are performed to analyze the data. Findings Results show that the internal factors have significant impact at one percent on the acceptance of takaful by policy-holders. There is also a significant difference in the innovative nature between Muslims and non-Muslims. Mean values from the T-test show that Muslims are more innovative than non-Muslims in India offering a good sign for India to start offering takaful since Muslims could be the core customer base. Research limitations/implications This study focuses on internal factors influencing individual policy-holders’ willingness to participate in takaful. The findings can be the starting point for future research exploring the influence of external factors on such willingness to participate with potential benefits to local authorities, investors, insurance companies, and the public in India.. Originality/value This study provides crucial information about the demand side of takaful in India. The innovative nature of Indian policy-holders signals positive potential for operators to offer takaful in India, and to concerned regulatory bodies to expedite its introduction to the market.
... Qualitative examinations into diffusion of innovations in Communications research tend to turn to interviews (Lowrey, 1991), focus groups (Harting, Rutten, Rutten, & Kremers, 2009), participant observation (Liao, 2016) or some combination of the three. However, these methods do not refute the two most significant critiques of diffusion of innovation research. ...
Thesis
Full-text available
This dissertation examines early adopters of mass-marketed Virtual Reality (VR), as well as other immersive technologies, and the playful processes by which they incorporate the devices into their lives within New York City. Starting in 2016, relatively inexpensive head-mounted displays (HMDs) began to be manufactured and distributed by leaders in the game and information technology industries. However, even before these releases, developers and content creators were testing the devices through “development kits.” These de facto early adopters, who are distinctly commercially-oriented, acted as a launching point for the dissertation to scrutinize how, why and in what ways digital technologies spread to the wider public. Taking a multimethod approach that combines semi-structured interviews, two years of participant observation, media discourse analysis and autoethnography, the dissertation details a moment in the diffusion of an innovation and how publicity, social forces and industry influence adoption. This includes studying the media ecosystem which promotes and sustains VR, the role of New York City in framing opportunities and barriers for new users, and a description of meetups as important communities where devotees congregate. With Game Studies as a backdrop for analysis, the dissertation posits that the blurry relationship between labor and play held by most enthusiasts sustains the process of VR adoption. Their “playbor” colors not only the rhetoric and the focus of meetups, but also the activities, designs, and, most importantly, the financial and personal expenditures they put forth. Ultimately, play shapes the system of production by which adopters of commercial VR are introduced to the technology and, eventually, weave it into their lives. Situating play at the center of this system highlights that the assimilation of digital media is in part an embodied and irrational experience. It also suggests new models by which future innovations will spread to the public.
... Similar calls have emerged from various fields and past researchers have also risen up to the challenge. In marketing, Lowrey (1991), in attempting to understand consumers' reasons for purchasing particular products and their reasons for postponing purchase decisions or resisting other product purchases, exhorted researchers to adopt a newer approach towards the study of consumer innovativeness. In social science, Richins (2001) exhorts researchers to look at consumer behaviour not just as related to economic performance but as social science, which is the study of society, human relationships and human behaviour in all its social and cultural aspects. ...
Chapter
Nowadays, most developed and non-developed countries care and pay attention to the explores because it plays a significant role in developing, improving, and solving problems. It is clear that billions of dollars are spent on the investigates to get relevant results or findings. In any research, it can be found some pillars that guide the researcher to get his/her objectives. This chapter is explained in several sections. Section two focuses on two theories: new product adoption theory and new product diffusion theory, whereas the following section describes the research methodology in detail in this chapter. Qualitative research is applied by interviewing insurance operators, and it is appropriate for the exploratory study, and it is discussed in section five, and the last section concludes the chapter.
Article
Nowadays, smart wearable technology comes up to different sectors and is gaining momentum to be implemented in everyday objects. Smartwatches are the most popular type of wearable devices. The current study attempts to understand the motivational factors of consumers’ continuous intention to use smartwatches. In particular, a netnography research has been conducted and consumers’ opinions on smartwatches on Amazon have been analysed. Eight key determinants of continuous usage intention of smartwatches have been identified. Some of them (healthology, complementary goods and enabling technologies) were not included in previous technology adoption models, highlighting that existing models need to be updated when it comes in the domain of continuous usage intention of wearable technologies.
Article
Innovation, as a concept in healthcare, has broad implications ranging from diagnosis to treatment of disease. The advent of new surgical modalities and medical devices continues to refine and reshape the provision of care for millions of patients across the world. Despite the tangible promise of such innovation, there remains a dearth of frameworks to understand how and how much progress has been made, particularly with regard to early-stage, non-invasive therapeutic technologies that have the potential to transform the treatment of medical disorders. A chief example of this is provided by MR-guided Focused Ultrasound. To the best of our knowledge, there are no prior reviews of the factors affecting adoption and diffusion of MR-guided Focused Ultrasound as a proxy for disruptive medical technologies. The purpose of this review is to provide a comprehensive set of metrics to measure the factors affecting the rate of adoption and diffusion of these medical technologies with special focus on MR-guided Focused Ultrasound, Gamma Knife radiosurgery, and the da Vinci system. The authors review background information and literature regarding innovation in medical technology, and what constitutes disruptive innovation in the medical field. Metrics of adoption and diffusion are evaluated and applied to MR-guided Focused Ultrasound. Gamma Knife radiosurgery and the da Vinci system provide reasonable proxy technologies to understand the factors affecting the adoption and diffusion of MR-guided Focused Ultrasound. With a more comprehensive set of metrics to measure the rate of uptake and use of disruptive technology, we might move towards a better understanding of the limitations of new and potentially beneficial therapeutic modalities.
ResearchGate has not been able to resolve any references for this publication.