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Training laypersons to detect deception in oral narratives and exchanges

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Abstract

Three experiments were conducted to identify a limited set of indicators of truthfulness and deception in oral narratives and exchanges, as well as to train laypersons to use the indicators. In Experiment 1, participants attempted to judge whether an actor in a video was being truthful or deceptive during a consensual conversation with a law enforcement officer. Truth and deception were defined by a limited set of indicators compiled from the research and literature review by McCormack et al. (1). The results showed a strong bias toward judgments of deception. In Experiment 2, research volunteers were instructed to give arguments that were either consistent with their true beliefs or opposite their true beliefs. Differences in verbal, vocal, and behavioral components were quantified and were used as training materials in Experiment 3. With limited training on the indicators, laypersons in Experiment 3 did not improve their rate of accuracy. Practical implications for detecting deception and implementing training protocols are discussed.

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... Reason for exclusion Cao, Lin, Deokar, Burgoon, Crews, and Adkins (2004) Usability study (no deception detection training study) Cao, Crews, Nunamaker, Burgoon, and Lin (2004) Usability study (no deception detection training study) Clark (1983) Not retrievable Dando and Bull (2011) Training study, but lack of untrained control group or pre-test; only five trainees. Elaad (2003) Lack of statistical data for computing an effect size Enos, Shriberg, Graciarena, Hirschberg, and Stolcke (2007) No training study, computer program used-no human judges Ford (2004) Detection of five specific cue categories (emotional, arousal, memory, cognitive effort, communication tactics) measured between pre-and posttest, no data provided for detection accuracy overall Geiselman, Elmgren, Green, and Rystad (2011) Training program is based upon cues derived from the same stimulus material (Exp. 2) that the experimental (training) group also rated later (Exp. ...
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