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Platelet Rich Plasma stimulates human hair growth in vitro

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Abstract

Several factors are involved in hair growth and cycling (Buffoli et al., 2013). Platelet concentrates have a new important role in regenerative medicine and thus in dermatology, oral, plastic and orthopaedic surgery and hair growth (Franco et al., 2012). In this study we evaluated in vitro the effects of Platelet-Rich Plasma (PRP), an autologous platelet preparation, on hair growth. In particular, we compared four different culture media (Philpott et al., 1990): 1-William?s E culture medium with supplemented factors; 2-William?s E culture medium with supplemented factors and Platelet Rich Plasma; 3-William?s E culture medium without supplemented factors; 4-William?s E culture medium without supplemented factors but with PRP. Hair shaft elongation was measured at 0, 24, 48, 72 and 96 hours: digitally fixed images of slices were analyzed using an image analyzer considering as measurable portion the shaft part between the bulb upper border and the top of the hair end. The values obtained were used to calculate the percentage of elongation for each time. Growth in hair cultured with William?s E medium with supplemented factors and PRP resulted higher with respect to the other media. Moreover, these results suggest that PRP stimulates human hair growth in vitro.
IJAE
Vol. 118, n. 2 (Supplement): 57, 2013
© 2013 Firenze University Press
http://www.fupress.com/ijae
ITALIAN JOURNAL OF ANATOMY AND EMBRYOLOGY
Platelet Rich Plasma stimulates human hair growth in
vitro
Marco Angelo Cocchi1*, Paola Bezzola2, Elisabetta Sorbellini2, Anna Trink2, Mauro Labanca1,
Veronica Bonazza1 and Fabio Rinaldi2
1 Section of Anatomy and Physiopathology, Department of Clinical and Experimental Sciences, University of
Brescia, Brescia, Italy
2 International Hair Research Foundation (IHRF), Milan, Italy
Several factors are involved in hair growth and cycling (Buoli et al., 2013).
Platelet concentrates have a new important role in regenerative medicine and thus
in dermatology, oral, plastic and orthopaedic surgery and hair growth (Franco et al.,
2012). In this study we evaluated in vitro the eects of Platelet-Rich Plasma (PRP),
an autologous platelet preparation, on hair growth. In particular, we compared four
dierent culture media (Philpott et al., 1990): 1-William’s E culture medium with
supplemented factors; 2-William’s E culture medium with supplemented factors and
Platelet Rich Plasma; 3-William’s E culture medium without supplemented factors;
4-William’s E culture medium without supplemented factors but with PRP. Hair shaft
elongation was measured at 0, 24, 48, 72 and 96 hours: digitally xed images of slices
were analyzed using an image analyzer considering as measurable portion the shaft
part between the bulb upper border and the top of the hair end. The values obtained
were used to calculate the percentage of elongation for each time. Growth in hair cul-
tured with William’s E medium with supplemented factors and PRP resulted higher
with respect to the other media. Moreover, these results suggest that PRP stimulates
human hair growth in vitro.
References
[1] Buoli et al. (2013) The human hair: from anatomy to physiology. Int J Dermatol (In press).
[2] Franco et al. (2012) Protocol for obtaining Platelet-Rich Plasma (PRP), Platelet-Poor Plasma (PPP),
and Thrombin for Autologous use. Aesthetic Plast Surg 36(5): 1254-1259.
[3] Philpott et al. (1990) Human hair growth in vitro. J Cell Sci 97(3): 463-471.
Keywords
Platelet, growth factors, human hair.
... Various studies demonstrated that the use of PRP in hair transplantation could promote hair growth and accelerate larger follicular units [5,7]. Together with earlier researches [6,27], our study demonstrates that PRP could promote the hair growth. ...
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Background Platelet-rich plasma (PRP) is an autologous concentration of human platelets in plasma. In this paper, we aimed to investigate the effect of PRP on hair growth. Methods Platelet-rich plasma and platelet-poor plasma were prepared by sterile centrifugation and injected into shaved dorsal skin of mice (n = 10). Saline injection was used in the control group. The length of randomly plucked hairs was measured at 8, 13, 18 days after PRP injection. Histological examination was preformed to observe the histologic changes of skins. The immunohistochemistry analysis of CD31 was performed to detect the changes of hair length and formation of new vessels. Results At 13 and 18 days after the last injection, the hair length of mice in PRP group (4.24 ± 0.60 and 8.29 ± 0.48 mm, respectively) was significantly longer compared with the control group (3.70 ± 0.52 and 7.21 ± 0.64 mm, p < 0.05). No significant difference in the hair length was found between the PPP group and the control (p > 0.05). In addition, the number of CD31-positive vessel in the PRP group (9.90 ± 0.60) was more than that in the control group (8.60 ± 2.34, p < 0.05). Conclusion Platelet-rich plasma might promote hair length growth and increase the number of hair follicles by inducing angiogenesis.
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We report for the first time the successful maintenance and growth of human hair follicles in vitro. Human anagen hair follicles were isolated by microdissection from human scalp skin. Isolation of the hair follicles was achieved by cutting the follicle at the dermo-subcutaneous fat interface using a scalpel blade. Intact hair follicles were then removed from the fat using watchmakers' forceps. Isolated hair follicles maintained free-floating in supplemented Williams E medium in individual wells of 24-well multiwell plates showed a significant increase in length over 4 days. The increase in length was seen to be attributed to the production of a keratinised hair shaft, and was not associated with the loss of hair follicle morphology. [methyl-3H]thymidine autoradiography confirmed that in vitro the in vivo pattern of DNA synthesis was maintained; furthermore, [35S]methionine labelling of keratins showed that their patterns of synthesis did not change with maintenance. The importance of this model to hair follicle biology is further demonstrated by the observations that TGF-beta 1 has a negative growth-regulatory effect on hair follicles in vitro and that EGF mimics the in vivo depilatory effects that have been reported in sheep and mice.
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Background Plasma has been widely studied and used in many different situations to speed up healing with better tissue adherence and hemostasis. Research projects are now attempting to isolate platelet-rich plasma (PRP) and platelet-poor plasma (PPP), making better use of their properties, particularly during operations and for wounds that are slow to heal. In view of the wide diversity of industrial machines and extraction protocols, together with the variety of industrially produced biologic glues, this article suggests an option for obtaining PRP, PPP, and human thrombin for autologous use. Methods A way of obtaining PRP, PPP, and thrombin is reproduced through a protocol defined and established by the authors. Autologous thrombin and plasma were obtained through the collection and successive centrifugation of ten whole blood samples, until the desired hemocomponents were isolated, followed by quantitative and qualitative analyses of the elements obtained. Results The mean platelet concentration obtained was 6.03 × 108 platelets/ml, with a mean thrombin concentration of 33.54 nM, both values compatible with reports in the literature when different protocols are applied. Conclusions The protocol described is a good option for the preparation and application of PRP, PPP, and autologous thrombin, particularly as they can be obtained simultaneously, eliminating the possibilities of viral contamination and allergic reactions. Moreover, the cost of this procedure is low, it is easy to perform, and replicable. Level of Evidence IV This journal requires that authors assign a level of evidence to each article. For a full description of these Evidence-Based Medicine ratings, please refer to the Table of Contents or the online Instructions to Authors www. springer. com/ 00266.