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Psychogenic complications of making dentures. theoretical background, prevention and treatment possibilities

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Abstract

Psychogenic complications of making dentures as well as consequently appearing psychogenic denture intolerance is a complex and rising problem of dentistry and presents many intricate problems, which are being tackled by various disciplines of both basic and clinical research. Estimations based on the available data and clinical experience indicate that, at least 3-4% of denture wearers suffer from psychogenic symptoms caused by the treatment procedure, insertion or wearing of fixed or removable dentures. No wonder that, there is a high amount of scientific information gathered so far, however data are rather divergent, sometimes even contradictory and there are numerous questions without any available data to answer. Present chapter is primarily dedicated to the clinical aspects of these phenomena, including clinical manifestations, diagnosis, prevention and treatment possibilities. Other relevant subject areas of this chapter include theoretical background and peculiarities of denture-related psychological and psycho-physiological phenomena, background and pathomechanisms of denture induced psychosomatic manifestations, basic principles of communication and patient-nurse-dentist interrelationships. This collection of information helps the reader to be at home in scientific field of denture related psychogenic manifestations.

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