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Crises, Radical Online Journalism, and the State

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Understanding the Liberal State Corporate Media, Hegemony, and Counter-Hegemony Maintaining Order: A Tale of Two Rebellions Producing Alternative Spaces The Liberal Paradox: Media Freedom as Constraint Conclusion Note References
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... As a response to crises, mediated public spheres may challenge political and social hegemony (Salter, 2012). In Spain, the mobilizations that emerged after 2011 were accompanied by a modification in the digital media, with a political discourse that, as reported in The Guardian (Kassam, 2014), offered the population alternative sources. ...
... This stance explains the results of our study, insofar as online-only opinion was less fiscally conservative in 2014. In the context of the global economic crisis, the fact that there were no favorable mentions of reductions in public spending in 2014 contrasts with the stance adopted by international media such as BBC News Online, which has advocated cutting public spending (Salter, 2012). ...
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