Article

Developing an interface in performance based computational design: Acoustical performance of preliminary designs

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Abstract

In architecture of our day, with the enhancement in technology, experiencing design decisions and/or changes by means of various computational technologies in computational medium has become an essential design tool. With the presence of the tools used in computational medium, changes in the architectural design process occurred and the usage of the tools drifted from simply virtual experience to optimization of the design by examining the design throughout the process. In the performance based design approach, compliance of the design to the design parameters is examined throughout the design process and by this way necessary changes regarding concerned parameters are made throughout the process to optimize the design. However, software present in the computational medium are mostly designed for the visualization and measurement of static/dynamic performance of the design and the software developed for the acoustical evaluation only provides information after the design is formed and cannot cover the whole design process. The article relates to the user friendly software which provides aural and analysis data about the acoustical performance in the preliminary design phase before the details of the design becomes clear, which is also usable by the architects who do not have advanced acoustical knowledge.

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