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The diversity of dental clinical features in an Spanish military population and its implications for dental identification

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Abstract

Dental identification is established when dental antemortem data are compared to postmortem dental charts and a high number of coincidences are found. Moreover, if any discrepancies are detected, they have to be explained. Therefore, they are some limitations to achieving a consistent dental identification probability due to the fact that there are not enough epidemiological data bases about dental treatments or dental pathologies for each tooth obtained from different origin populations where we could estimate accurately the likehood ratio for a dental identification. In order to contribute to a better understanding of dental characteristics in Spain, a dental data base from an Spanish military population has been constructed. A codification system has been developed and 2091 cases have been introduced into the system. Results presented in this paper shown the frequencies and distributions of dental treatments and pathologies in the population explored. It is concluded that it is of great importance the development of those dental data bases for application on estimation of probabilities for dental identification.

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Dental patterns in forensic dentistry: Are they useful for identification?
  • S Martín de las Heras
  • A Valenzuela
  • JdeD Luna
  • M Bravo