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The Lepidoptera of White Sands National Monument 7: A New Species of the Genus Areniscythris (Scythrididae), a Recently Discovered Iconic Species from the Monument

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Abstract

A new species of Scythrididae, Areniscythris whitesands sp. nov. Metzler and Lightfoot, is described from a series of specimens that were found active during the daytime on open bare sand of the white gypsum dunes at White Sands National Monument, Otero Co., New Mexico. Adults and genitalia of the male and female are illustrated, and the bionomy of the species is shortly discussed.
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... Landry (1991) specifically explained that many species of Scythrididae are identical in outward appearance, thus making it very difficult for a positive identification without examining the genital organs. The description of this species is another in a series of publications describing new species of moths at White Sands National Monument (WSNM), Otero County, New Mexico, USA (see Metzler 2014, Metzler 2016, Metzler et al. 2009, Metzler & Forbes, 2011a, 2011b, 2011c, Metzler & Lightfoot 2014. ...
... In this survey during the period 9 February 2007 through 4 December 2015, more than 650 named species (unpublished data) of described Lepidoptera were recorded from the Monument. Additionally, twelve new species were so far described on the basis of moths discovered during this study at White Sands National Monument (Metzler 2014, Metzler 2016Metzler et al. 2009Metzler et al. , 2010Metzler & Forbes 2011a, 2011b, 2011c, 2012Metzler & Lightfoot 2014, Wright 2012, Wright & Gilligan 2015. ...
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The U.S. National Park Service initiated a 10-year study of the Lepidoptera at White Sands National Monument, Otero County, New Mexico in late 2006. Arotrura landryorum sp. n., described here, was discovered in 2007, during the first year of the study. The male and female adult moths and genitalia are illustrated.
... The Cuatrociénegas Protected Area is located in a basin which possesses year-round fresh water in deep pools supplied by springs (Smith et al. 2011). These parks are home to numerous endemic moth species (Metzler 2014(Metzler , 2016(Metzler , 2017aMetzler and Landry 2016;Metzler and Lightfoot 2014;Metzler and Porter 2018;Metzler and Scott-Tracey 2019, 2010a, b, 2016Metzler and Forbes 2011;Wright 2014) supposedly adapted to the high gypsum content of their environment or for the isolated patches of lush vegetation surrounding the pools where C. clara was collected. ...
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A new species of Callistege Hübner, [1823] (Lepidoptera, Erebidae, Erebinae, Euclidiini) is described from Cuatrociénegas Protected Area and Biosphere Preserve in Coahuila, Mexico. Adult male and female moths are illustrated, including genitalia. Callistege clara Homziak & Metzler, sp. nov. is one of 27 new species of insects discovered during an inventory survey of arthropods of White Sands National Monument, USA, and Cuatrociénegas Protected Area (Mexico), funded by the U.S. National Park Service. The Cuatrociénegas Basin is known for high endemism of aquatic and wetland biota within the Chihuahuan Desert. Callistege clara Homziak & Metzler, sp. nov. was found in a wetland environment.
... Sympistis sierrablanca is another of a growing list (50) of white species of moths recently discovered in the white gypsum dunes formation in the Tularosa Basin of southern New Mexico (Kain 2000;Metzler et al. 2009;Metzler and Forbes 2011a,b;Metzler and Lightfoot 2014;Metzler 2014Metzler , 2016Metzler , 2017Wright 2014;Metzler and Landry 2016;Metzler and Porter 2018). Ten additional endemic species are varying shades of gray. ...
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In 2006, the U.S. National Park Service invited Metzler to conduct a 10-yr study of the moths at White Sands National Monument, Otero County, in the Tularosa Basin in southern New Mexico. No other location of similar size, 0.72 km², in the North America is reported to have more endemic species of moths. Sympistis sierrablanca Metzler and Scott-Tracey, sp. n. (Lepidoptera, Noctuidae), perhaps not an endemic, described here is another of the white species of moths in the geologically young (8000 BP) dunes formation. Adult moths and male and female genitalia are illustrated.
... More than 600 named species were recorded from the transect, along with approximately 60 undescribed species (unpublished data). The species described herein is the 16th to appear in 18 peer-reviewed publications: Metzler ( , 2017aMetzler ( , 2017b), Metzler and Landry (2016), Metzler and Lightfoot (2014), Metzler et al. (2009), Metzler and Forbes (2011a, 2011b, 2011c, Wright (2012Wright ( , 2014, Wright and Gilligan (2015). Most of the new species from the Monument are white or very pale in color as described by Kain (2000). ...
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In 2006, the U.S. National Park Service invited the first author to conduct a 10-year study of the moths at White Sands National Monument, in the Tularosa Basin in southern New Mexico. Eucosma gypsumana (Tortricidae, Olethreutinae, Eucosmini) Metzler and Porter, new species, discovered during the study is described. Adult moths and male and female genitalia are illustrated. A graph illustrating an unexplained temporal population irregularity of E. gypsumana is presented. A list of species of Eucosma from the Monument is provided.
... This is the 13 th paper pertinent to new species of moths emanating from my study. (METZLER 2014a(METZLER , 2014b(METZLER , 2016METZLER & LANDRY 2016;METZLER & FORBES 2011b, 2011cMETZLER & LIGHTFOOT 2014;WRIGHT 2012WRIGHT , 2014WRIGHT & GILLIGAN 2015). ...
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Protogygia whitesandsensis Metzler & Forbes, 2009 was described from a series of 18 males. In March, 2010 a single female was captured and is described here. The female imago and genitalia are illustrated. © 2017, Soc Hispano-Luso-Amer Lepidopterologia-Shilap. All rights reserved.
... In the period 9 February 2007 through 30 July 2016, I collected more than 600 named species (unpublished data) of Lepidoptera from the Monument plus approximately 40 undescribed species of moths. This is the 13th description of a new species of moth emanating from the study (see Metzler 2014Metzler , 2016Metzler et al. 2009;Metzler and Forbes 2011a, 2011b, 2012Metzler and Landry 2016, Metzler and Lightfoot 2014, Wright 2012, Wright and Gilligan 2015. ...
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The U.S. National Park Service initiated a 10-year study of the Lepidoptera at White Sands National Monument, Otero County, New Mexico in late 2006. Giviradelindaesp. n., discovered in 2007 during the first year of study, is described here. The male and female adult moths and genitalia are illustrated. The name is dedicated to Delinda Mix, mother of Steve Mix. The species of Cossidae recorded from the Monument during the study are listed.
... In the period 9 February 2007 through 30 January 2016, Metzler recorded more than 650 (unpublished data) species of described Lepidoptera from White Sands and approximately 40 undescribed species of moths. This is the twelfth description of a new species of moth emanating from the study (see Metzler 2014b, Metzler et al. 2009, Metzler & Forbes 2011b, 2011c, Metzler & Lightfoot 2014, Wright 2012, Wright & Gilligan 2015. Hodges (1999) revised the species of Chionodes Hübner, [1825], found in North American north of Mexico. ...
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