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Hybrid fuel cell gas turbine (FC/GT) combined cycle systems

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Abstract

Hybrid fuel cell gas turbine systems consisting of high-temperature fuel cells (HTFCs) integrated into cycles with gas turbines can significantly increase fuel-to-electricity conversion efficiency and lower emissions of greenhouse gases and criteria pollutants from the electric power sector. In addition, the separated anode and cathode compartments of the fuel cell can enable CO2 separation and sequestration for some cycle configurations. Hybrid fuel cell gas turbine technology has the potential to operate on natural gas, digester gas, landfill gas, and coal and biomass syngas. HTFC technologies are emerging with high reliability and durability, which should enable them to be integrated with gas turbine technology to produce modern hybrid power systems. Advanced thermodynamic and dynamic simulation capabilities have been developed and demonstrated to enable future system integration and control.

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... Energy efficiency improvement of the combined cycle power plant with gas turbine steam cooling was presented by Kotowicz et al. [21]. The fuel cells, because of their high efficiency and low environmental pollution, are excellent choices for use in these dual cycles [22]. Another advantage of fuel cells is that they directly convert chemical energy into electrical energy and are not limited to Carnot cycle. ...
... The net amount of heat produced during the three mentioned reactions is determined by means of Eq. (22). Some of this net residual heat goes to raise the temperature of the fuel cell interior and outlet gases and some is discharged into the surrounding environment (Eq. ...
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