Article

SleepCare: Obstructive sleep apnoea screening using mobile health technology

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Abstract

Obstructive Sleep Apnoea (OSA) is a disorder characterised by pauses in breathing during sleep which lead to deoxygenation. It is associated with increased risk of serious conditions including cardiovascular disease, diabetes and stroke. OSA prevalence ranges from 2-7% throughout the world, but it is estimated that up to 90% of cases are undiagnosed and untreated. OSA is usually diagnosed with a costly overnight sleep study, where a large number of physiological signals are recorded and analysed. The recent increase in adoption of smartphones has led to the proliferation of many sleep screening applications, but no existing application is based on scientific evidence. In this project we propose a novel OSA screening framework involving a pulse oximeter, a smartphone and an online server. The screening algorithms have been evaluated on a clinical database of 1007 patients and show 85.6% accuracy on the test set in identifying those diagnosed with OSA. This framework has the potential to provide a simple, cheap and widely-available modality for OSA screening, particularly in developing countries where conventional screening is limited.

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... & C., 2018) menjelaskan bahwa lama waktu apnea dapat bervariasi, ada yang 20-30 detik bahkan ada yang lebih dari 120 detik. Hal ini dapat mengakibatkan kondisi yang serius berupa penyakit kardiovaskuler, stroke dan diabetes (Roebuck et al., 2014). Bahkan yang paling fatal adalah kematian (Panzel Angka kejadian Sleep apnea ini meningkat selama dua dekade terakhir dan perlu mendapat perhatian. ...
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Obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) has been recognized in the Western world as a public health burden, but there has been no community-based study performed to assess the prevalence of the condition in India. The study was performed to assess the prevalence and risk factors of OSA in a semi-urban Indian population. A two-stage, cross-sectional, community-based prevalence study. A semi-urban community in Delhi.Duration: Two years (2003 to 2005). Patients and participants: All citizens residing in the community who were 30 to 60 years of age. Exclusion criteria included those patients with recent myocardial infarction, upper airway surgery, class III/IV congestive heart failure, pregnancy, hypothyroidism on treatment, acromegaly, chronic renal failure, systemic steroid treatment, and hormone replacement therapy. An OSA assessment was performed in 2,400 subjects who were screened in stage 1 of the study by means of a sleep questionnaire. Subjects were then divided into habitual and nonhabitual snorers. Eighty-three randomly selected habitual snorers and 80 nonhabitual snorers were invited to participate in stage 2 of the study, which consisted of in-hospital polysomnography studies. Observations and results: A total of 2,150 subjects returned questionnaires (response rate, 90%). Of 550 habitual snorers and 1,596 nonhabitual snorers, 77 habitual snorers and 73 nonhabitual snorers underwent polysomnography. A total of 36 habitual snorers (46.75%) and 2 nonhabitual snorers (2.73%) were found to have OSA, giving prevalence rates of 13.74% and 3.57%, respectively, for OSA and OSA syndrome (OSAS) on extrapolation. Multivariate analysis revealed that male gender, age, obesity (defined by a high body mass index), and waist/hip ratio as significant risk factors for OSAS. This study demonstrated that the risk factors and prevalence for OSA in India are similar to those in the West, which is contrary to the findings of some previous reports, which had a strong inclusion bias.
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Obstructive sleep apnoea (OSA) syndrome is the commonest sleep-related breathing disorder worldwide. In Asia, the prevalence of symptomatic OSA in middle-aged men and women is 4.1-7.5% and 2.1-3.2%, respectively. These prevalence rates are similar to those reported in Caucasian populations. Obesity, an established major risk factor for OSA, is less common among Asians, and the reported values of body mass indices (BMIs) of Asians with OSA are lower than in their Caucasian counterparts. However, these population-based studies have consistently demonstrated that obesity is still the major risk factor for OSA in Asians, while other studies have suggested that craniofacial structural factors may make a greater contribution towards development of OSA in Asians than in Caucasians. Sleep medicine is in a developmental stage in many Asian countries, and the condition is likely under-recognised. Although sleep laboratories have been set up in various countries in Asia, the availability of this service is very limited. Continuous positive airway pressure is available in most parts of Asia, but financial constraints may limit its utility. Oral appliances have been postulated to have a greater role in the management of OSA in Asian patients, as they are likely to have more modifiable factors in their craniofacial structures, but this is yet to be proven. There is a great need for research and health care development on sleep disordered breathing in Asia, and the solution will only come with efforts towards promotion of awareness of this condition in both professional and lay communities.