Article

6 Broodfish management

Authors:
  • Auburn University Alabama Fish Farming Center
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Abstract

Originally, channel catfish broodfish were obtained from the wild and spawned in captivity. Recently, broodfish are rarely taken from the wild because they can carry unwanted diseases, they may be slow growers and generally do not spawn readily in captivity, and are not available in quantities needed to sustain a large aquaculture industry. Wild broodfish captured in spawning condition can be hormonally induced to spawn but are difficult and unreliable spawners the second year. The strains of channel catfish that have undergone several generations of selection are the best choice for broodfish. Performance history such as growth, disease resistance, fecundity, and dress-out weight is lacking for most commercial strains; however, farmers should try to obtain this information for the strain in question. Broodfish management is an important aspect of channel catfish culture because a reliable source of fingerlings is essential to support a large aquaculture industry. Successful management of broodfish includes the genetic principles of selection for the qualities desired by the culturist and processor, and ending with the production of quality fry. This chapter discusses management techniques important to select, maintain, and spawn channel catfish broodfish.

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Article
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