ResearchPDF Available

Un abordaje al perfil del profesional capaz de establecer una colaboración eficaz y positiva entre familia y escuela

Authors:

Abstract

Son numerosos los estudios que han puesto en evidencia los beneficios que una relación positiva entre familia y escuela reportan al niño en su rendimiento escolar, adaptación social y emocional (Epstein y Sanders, 2000; Fan y Chen, 2001; Henderson y Mapp, 2002), a la familia y al mismo entorno educativo. Sin embargo, la realidad actual nos muestra cómo esta relación supone hacer frente a dificultades para los profesionales, entre otras razones por la diversidad social de situaciones familiares que existen, que requiere probablemente de mayor formación y preparación. Los docentes son quienes trabajan e interactúan con los progenitores, por lo que su rol es fundamental para que se establezcan cauces de relación positivos y para que se superen los conflictos que se vayan generando. Se presupone que el'educador posee las habilidades, actitudes y comportamientos necesarios que facilitarán esta relación positiva con las familias. Sin embargo, no siempre es así. Hay una escasez de estudios que abordan la cuestión de cómo preparar mejor a los docentes y de cómo tutelarles para que se impliquen positivamente en la colaboración con las familias (Mir, Batle y Hernández, 2009). Por este motivo, y partiendo de estudios teóricos previos, en estas páginas se apuntan tres dimensiones (la dimensión técnico-profesional del profesor, la eficacia del trabajo con los padres y la percepción del cumplimiento de la labor familiar) en las que el docente debe ser competente para poder establecer y mantener una relación positiva con la familia actual.
A preview of the PDF is not available
ResearchGate has not been able to resolve any citations for this publication.
Article
Full-text available
The growing evidence indicating the considerable influence of the family on children’s scholastic development suggested the need for a more careful theoretical investigation and explanation of how the home and the school influence children’s schooling. Both psychological and sociological models were proposed to this end. Their common assumptions are, firstly, that families and schools impinge most directly on the child, and, secondly, that families differentially prepare and reinforce their children’s attributes required by schools and that schools may or may not build upon the resources children bring from home. Two theoretical concepts that attempt to explain this impact and demonstrate the importance of active school-family relationships is that of ‘cultural capital’, introduced and developed by Pierre Bourdieu, and the concept of ‘social capital’, coined by James Coleman. This paper presents these two theoretical positions in order to investigate their capacity to provide a framework for explaining how school and family collaboration influence children’s school success.
Article
Full-text available
The objective of this review is to examine research on home-based and school-based parental involvement and generate new research questions by employing Bronfenbrenner's ecological framework consisting of the micro-, meso-, exo-, and macrosystems. This analysis shows that, although both family-based and school-based parental involvement are positively related to educational outcomes, their examination in the ecological framework prompts consideration of additional aspects of the micro- and mesosystems and their embeddedness in four exosystemic aspects (parents' networks and workplace, neighborhood, and educational policy) and two macrosystemic types (immigrant and ethnic groups). Guided by Bronfenbrenner's ecological thinking and the availability of advanced multivariate analysis methods, the next stage of this research should test multiple-step models describing factors that prompt parental involvement and mediate and moderate the parental involvement - educational outcomes links in different sociocultural settings.
Article
Full-text available
Three types of parent involvement—communicating, volunteering at school, and learning at home—were explored in two cultures within the United States. Immigrant Chinese parents and European American parents of young children reflect their different traditions in the ways they involve themselves in their child's academic life. European American parents volunteered more in schools, while Chinese American parents focused more on systematic teaching of their children at home. Chinese American parents were more critical of typical primary school report cards without ABC grades. Parents’ home teaching methods showed stability over time, demonstrating that parents who used formal, structured methods at Time 1 continued to do two and four years later.
Article
This paper reports on an investigation of collaboration between schools and adult education providers in relation to some case-study examples of ‘parent education’ and ‘family literacy’ programmes. It examines how these organizations' different conceptions of their purposes and their under-pinning values can lead to different outcomes particularly in relation to their conceptualization of the role of the ‘parent’. It argues that schoolteachers and adult education staff come from distinct cultures and have different ideas about education and learning. They have, however, distinctive and complementary roles to play in promoting learning and education and creating a fairer social order. Using a parent centred, dialogic approach positions parents as people with an important contribution to make rather than as ‘problems’ that need to change to the school's way of seeing things. The paper suggests that whilst learning alone cannot abolish inequality and social divisions it can make a real contribution to combating them, not least by tackling the ways in which social exclusion is reinforced through the very processes and outcomes of education and training. If parents can be helped to challenge deficit views of the culture of their homes and communities then a small step has been taken in enabling their voices to be heard in the learning of their children and in their own educational development. For this to happen, however, some of the control that professionals have imposed on schooling for so long will have to be released and parents would need to be regarded as people with important contributions to make as collaborating educational partners.
Article
Although parent–teacher interaction is a key factor for children's education, little attention has been paid to this issue in teacher education programs. This study explores and examines the opinions of elementary preservice teachers about parental involvement in elementary children's education. While a total of 223 preservice teachers from a large research university in the southeast of United States participated in the quantitative part, twelve preservice teachers within the same sample who were at the end of their student teaching participated in the qualitative part of the study. Study results suggested that teacher education programmes where parental involvement instruction and activities are integrated into the courses help preservice teachers become better prepared and carry positive opinions toward parental involvement.
Article
This study examined and compared the educational perspectives of Korean parents of elementary school students and their teachers. 430 parents and 143 teachers in the New York metropolitan area participated in the survey and 16 teachers, administrators, and parents were interviewed. The findings indicated that the teachers not only misunderstood the parents' perspectives on the goals of schooling, but also underestimated the parents' ways of supporting their children's education. Regarding the current school/teacher practices, the two groups also expressed different perspectives. We discussed the urgency of educators' critical reflection on diverse cultures and the considerations for increasing parents' school involvement.
Article
Parents' involvement in their children's education has been shown to have positive results in various aspects of child development such as behaviour, social-emotional development and academic performance. This article focuses on teachers' views of the major problems affecting home-school partnership and possible solutions to improve communication between school and family. It examines teachers' accounts of the components of parental participation in the process of pupil learning and evaluates teachers' suggestions for improving teacher-parent collaboration in Greek schools. The results show that Greek secondary school teachers have a positive attitude towards parental involvement in school but find that in fact parental involvement in Greek schooling is poor and infrequent. Most teachers ascribe poor parent-school relationship to factors such as parental unwillingness to respond to school initiated partnership schemes and to the parents' educational and social background. Generally speaking, Greek teachers appear to be in favour of an active collaboration with parents which will benefit schools, families and pupils.