Soybean Proteomics

Chapter · June 2010with 4 Reads
DOI: 10.1201/EBK1578086818-c13
In book: Genetics, Genomics, and Breeding of Soybean, pp.291-312
Abstract
Soybeans [Glycine max (L.) Merr.] are the most important commercial legume crops grown in the world and are an excellent source of protein, oil, dietary fiber, and phytonutrients. In this chapter, we discuss proteomics tools for soybean protein analysis with emphasis on protein extraction, two-dimensional polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (2D-PAGE) separation, and matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization time of flight (MALDI-TOF) coupled with liquid chromatography mass spectrometry (LC-MS) for identification of different types of soybean seed and leaf proteins. Recent advances in mass spectrometry and protein sequence databases enabled identification of complex proteins.
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    By a sandwich enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay, a soybean major allergen, Gly m Bd 30K, in soybean products was measured. The allergen occurred at high concentrations in soy milk, tofu, kori-dofu, and yuba, but its content in kinako was small. No allergen was found in fermented foods such as miso, shoyu, and natto. The allergen was clearly shown to occur in meat balls, beef croquettes, and fried chicken that contained soybean protein isolate. © 1995, Japan Society for Bioscience, Biotechnology, and Agrochemistry. All rights reserved.
  • Food Processing Characteristics of Soybean 11s and 7s Proteins: Part I. Effect of Difference of Protein Components among Soybean Varieties on Formation of Tofu-gel
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  • Chapter
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  • Chapter
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    Full-text available
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    Full-text available
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  • Article
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  • Article
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    Full-text available
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