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Sustainable Nature-based Tourism Assessment Toolkit (SUNTAT)

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Abstract

The Sustainable Nature-based Tourism Assessment Toolkit (SUNTAT), provides a mechanism that goes beyond simply defining sustainable tourism, and has begun a process of tangibly and transparently measuring its characteristics in a reliable and comparable way. By developing a database of economic, environmental, and social benchmarks relevant to sustainability, the toolkit may be used to develop baseline standards and improve performance within the tourism industry. The toolkit has been tested at four safari lodges in South Africa (Ngala Private Game Reserve, Jackalberry Lodge, Sabi Sabi and Pretoriuskop Camp) and a community-based tourism enterprise in Mozambique (Covane Community Lodge). Application of this toolkit may allow researchers to define the characteristics of the triple bottom line as relevant to different environments and destinations.
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... Similarly to the Timbavati, the SSW is unfenced from KNP, and so wildlife can move freely between the national park and the private reserve. The SSW is overseen by a consortium of local landowners, which is governed by a constitution whose objectives include the promotion, conservation and protection of wildlife, fauna and flora within the reserve (Spenceley, 2002d). Sabi Sabi has three lodges on its property -Bush, Earth and Selati lodges -each of which provides a different experience for guests through different styles of architecture and facilities. ...
... Guests are taken on photographic safari tours in open-top land rovers, and have the option of bush walks and visits to hides on the property. The majority of guests are from Europe ($40%) but there is are also substantial African visitors ($25%) (Spenceley, 2002d). The Huntingdon community lies to the west of the Sabi Sand Wildtuin, inhabited by approximately 6500 people within the Khosa Tribal Authority. ...
... The Huntingdon community lies to the west of the Sabi Sand Wildtuin, inhabited by approximately 6500 people within the Khosa Tribal Authority. There was a low level of employment (35% in women and 40% in men: Mhlongo, 2001), the main source of employment being the lodges within the SSW (Spenceley, 2002d). ...
... Although the culprits were caught this led to adverse publicity for the park and the route to Numbi Gate. After discussions between the police and KNP, regular patrols were made along the route, and a diversion sign was placed before the turnoff to Numbi advising tourists to enter the park via the Paul Kruger Gate further north, and therefore not use the road (Spenceley, 2001b). Therefore, this illustrates a situation where antisocial activities towards tourist in the wider community have had the potential to adversely impact on specific economic activities benefiting from tourism. ...
... The shop makes R9 -R15,000 per month, depending upon visitation to the park, and this revenue is predicted to support more than 600 families (Thwala 2000a). Given that the majority of 29,000 members of the adjacent Mdluli Tribal Authority are unemployed, this revenue can be significant in enhancing local livelihoods (Spenceley 2001b). ...
... During this time, some of the sculptors broke away from the Numbi Gate stall, and began to sell on the road just outside the gate and began undercutting the curio stall prices. However, this went against an agreed understanding inherent in the construction of the stall: there would be no other curio trade on the Numbi Gate road (Spenceley 2001b). ...
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The focus of this paper is to examine how changing institutional arrangements and policies affect poor people's livelihoods and access to natural resources. It addresses tourism in South Africa, and the growing role of the private sector in natural resource management. Six different scenarios are analysed to demonstrate how government, NGOs, the private sector and rural communities have influenced rural livelihoods through tourism practices. The scenarios have been illustrated with seventeen case studies from South Africa, Mozambique and Zimbabwe. The driving forces for initiatives and the degree to which the poor have influenced them are explored through the case studies, as are the costs, benefits and constraints of the scenarios.
... Despite lying adjacent to private game reserves, and along one of the main access routes to Kruger National Park, the community has made little progress in promoting economic development based on local tourism potential. There is a very low estimated employment rate of 3 per cent in women and 15 per cent in men (Spenceley, 2002c). ...
... A number of upmarket lodges, private camps, and residences are located in the reserve. The SSW is overseen by a consortium of local landowners, which is governed by a constitution whose objectives include the promotion, conservation and protection of wildlife, fauna and flora within the reserve (Spenceley, 2002d). ...
... Guests are taken on photographic safari tours in open-top land rovers, and may do bush walks and visit hides on the property. The majority of guests are from Europe (~40 per cent) but with a significant proportion of African visitors (~25 per cent) (Spenceley, 2002d). ...
... A selection of the ecotourism destinations in South Africa is shown in • Photographic safari tourism within nearly 2 million hectares of bushveld; environmental education; captive breeding of rare species; habitat manipulation; environmental and conservation management; research and monitoring programs. • Community development forums between the Social Ecology department of SANP and neighbouring communities; preferential purchasing of products from local rural entrepreneurs and black-empowerment companies; facilitation of entrepreneurial activities which financially benefit communities and the park (Spenceley, 2001 • Photographic safari tourism within a well designed network of tourist roads, with a range of accommodation infrastructure, hides and picnic areas. HUP is renowned for the largest population density of southern white rhino, and all surviving populations are derived from Umfolozi animals. ...
... Its purpose is to balance conservation of the Park, in partnership with the conservation manager KZNNCS, and optimal commercial development. Other partners such as the Lubombo Spatial Development Initiative (SDI) and Tourism KwaZulu-Natal are currently working with the Authority, DEA&T and KZNNCS to invite tourism developers to tender for concessions within the GSLWP (Taylor & Castis, 2000). ...
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The integration of biodiversity into other sectors of the national economy and civil society has been identified as a critical indicator of successful implementation of sustainable development practices and objectives of the Convention on Biological Diversity (CBD). Tourism is one of the fastest growing economic sectors and has an ecological footprint that reaches to almost every part of the Earth. As such, it has great potential to influence biodiversity conservation and sustainable use, in both positive and negative ways. Sustainable tourism has been highlighted recently as an area of major concern both within the CBD and was the focus of attention at the recent Conference of parties in Nairobi. In its final decisions, the CoP requested parties to submit case studies of best practise in sustainable tourism Outside the of the mechanism of the CBD, a large number of other initiatives linking biodiversity and tourism have been undertaken by other organisations, ranging from the World Tourism Organisation and UNESCO to numerous private tourism companies. Whilst these initiatives are welcome, there is a danger that the sheer volume and diversity of initiatives on biodiversity and tourism becomes a barrier to effective implementation of the right policies at the national level. It has been observed that national biodiversity planners will value any guidance to assist them to rapidly ‘sift’ through the available information and find that which best suits their particular requirements. BPSP therefore commissioned this study of the integration of biodiversity into the tourism sector with a specific focus on how best to incorporate ‘global best practice’ into national biodiversity strategy and action plans (NBSAPs). The study has included 12 case studies in selected countries to guide biodiversity planners to the best global information on biodiversity and tourism.
... The evolving situation in terms of their sense of ownership of the trail was also a matter of hot debate. Detailed surveys of community attitudes to Ngala and Thorneybush tourism lodges in Northern Province (Spenceley 2001a(Spenceley , 2001b revealed that expectations were not being met: the majority felt that tourism had the potential to contribute more to the local economy than it is currently doing. At Ngala, given high damage to agriculture, the majority believe that the costs of tourism outweigh the benefits. ...
Article
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An evaluation was undertaken to understand opportunities for stimulating local enterprise development within the tourism supply chain, linked to a private game reserve in South Africa, the Sabi Sand Game Reserve, which neighbours the Kruger National Park. The study focussed on understanding the market demand for local products and services from commercial lodges, and the current local supply from enterprises and entrepreneurs in local communities. This article quantifies the value of current procurement spend by lodges on local products and services and estimates their potential future expenditure. The study matches these responses with the availability of products and services in the neighbouring communities. It also provides insights into relationships between private lodges, game reserves and local communities in South Africa. It concurs with previous research on tourism supply chains in rural South Africa, and also makes recommendations for the development of local businesses with higher technical capacity development.
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