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The relationship between reading comprehension and IQ, measured with WISC-R and WISC III, in a clinical population

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Abstract

The current study analyzed the relationship between reading comprehension and IQ, measured with WISC-R and WISC III, in a clinical population aged between 6 and 15 years. The reading comprehension performance was correlated to total IQ score, Verbal and Performance IQ scores; in addition the contribution of each subtests for reading comprehension was considered. Results suggested that poor reading comprehension performance could be associated to low general cognitive abilities. However some exceptions emerged, in fact our results highlighted that also individuals with adequate IQ scores could have impaired reading comprehension, as usually happened in the case of learning disabilities.

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