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A first assessment of the Ticolichen biodiversity inventory in Costa Rica and adjacent areas: The thelotremoid Graphidaceae (Ascomycota: Ostropales)

Authors:
  • Botanischer Garten und Botanisches Museum Berlin
  • Laboratório de Botânica/Liquenologia

Abstract

In a continuation of our biotic inventory of lichenized fungi in Costa Rica and adjacent areas, we present a treatment of the thelotremoid Graphidaceae, that is the genera and species formerly included in Thelotremataceae. A total of 186 species in 23 genera are reported for Costa Rica, plus an additional 30 taxa for adjacent areas (El Salvador, Nicaragua, Panama) that are expected to occur in Costa Rica. This is the highest number of thelotremoid Graphidaceae reported for any country in the world thus far, followed by Australia (173 species), Sri Lanka (130 species), and Panama (110 species). Together with our previous treatment of the genus Graphis, a total of 293 species of Graphidaceae have now been reported for Costa Rica in revised monographic works, with revisions of larger genera such as Phaeographis still pending, suggesting that the total number of Graphidaceae in Costa Rica is over 400. In the present monograph, the following genus and 40 species taxa are described as new to science: Enigmotrema Lücking gen. nov., Acanthotrema bicellularis Sipman & Lücking, spec. nov., A. kalbii Lücking, spec. nov., Chapsa defecta Lücking, spec. nov., C. defectosorediata Lücking, spec. nov., C. farinosa Lücking & Sipman, spec. nov., C. perdissuta Sipman & Lücking, spec. nov., C. sublilacina var. cyanea Lücking, spec. nov., C. thallotrema Lücking & N. Salazar, spec. nov., Clandestinotrema analorenae Lücking, spec. nov., Enigmotrema rubrum Lücking, spec. nov., Gyrotrema aurantiacum Sipman, Lücking & Chaves, spec. nov., G. papillatum Lücking, spec. nov., Leucodecton album Sipman & Lücking, spec. nov., Myriotrema aggregans Sipman & Lücking, spec. nov., M. clandestinoides Sipman & Lücking, spec. nov., M. classicum Lücking, spec. nov., M. endoflavescens Hale ex Lücking, spec. nov., M. frondosolucens Lücking & Aptroot, spec. nov., Ocellularia albobullata Lücking, Sipman & Grube, spec. nov., O. cocosensis Lücking & Chaves, spec. nov., O. flavoperforata Lücking, spec. nov., O. gerardii Sipman, spec. nov., O. globifera Kalb & Lücking, spec. nov., O. inspersata Kalb & Lücking, spec. nov., O. inspersula Lücking & Aptroot, spec. nov., O. isohypocrellina Lücking & Kalb, spec. nov., O. laevigatula Kalb & Lücking, spec. nov., O. laeviusculoides Sipman & Lücking, spec. nov., O. praestantoides Sipman, spec. nov., O. pseudopyrenuloides Lücking, spec. nov., O. psorbarroensis Sipman, spec. nov., O. subcarassensis Sipman & Lücking, spec. nov., O. subpyrenuloides Lücking, spec. nov., O. supergracilis Kalb & Lücking, spec. nov., O. terrabensis Kalb & Lücking, spec. nov., O. zamorana Sipman, Lücking & Chaves, spec. nov., Thelotrema gomezianum Lücking, spec. nov., T. submyriocarpum Lücking, spec. nov., T. wilsonii Sipman & Lücking, spec. nov., and Wirthiotrema duplomarginatum Lücking, Mangold & Lumbsch, spec. nov. In addition, the following 19 new combinations are proposed: Ampliotrema dactylizum (Hale) Sipman, Lücking & Grube, comb. nov. [bas.: Ocellularia dactyliza Hale], A. panamense (Hale) Sipman & Lücking, comb. nov. [bas.: Leptotrema panamense Hale], C. discoides (Stirt.) Lücking, comb. nov. [Graphis discoides Stirt.], C. esslingeri (Hale) Sipman, comb. nov. [bas.: Ocellularia esslingeri Hale], C. hiata (Hale) Sipman, comb. nov. [bas.: Thelotrema hiatum Hale], C. pseudoschizostoma (Hale) Sipman, comb. nov. [bas.: Ocellularia pseudoschizostoma Hale], C. referta (Hale) Lücking, comb. nov. [bas.: Ocellularia referta Hale], C. stellata (Hale) Sipman, comb. nov. [bas.: Leptotrema stellatum Hale], Fibrillithecis pachystoma (Nyl.) Sipman, comb. nov. [bas.: Thelotrema pachystomum Nyl.], Leucodecton bisporum (Nyl.) Sipman & Lücking, comb. nov. [bas.: Thelotrema bisporum Nyl.], L. dactyliferum (Hale) Lücking, comb. nov. [bas.: Ocellularia dactylifera Hale], L. sordidescens (Fée) Lücking & Sipman, comb. nov. [bas.: Trypethelium sordidescens Fée], Ocellularia carassensis (Vain.) Sipman, comb. nov [bas.: Thelotrema carassense Vain.]., O. maxima (Hale) Lumbsch & Mangold, comb. nov. [bas.: Thelotrema maximum Hale], R. vulcani (Hale) Lücking, comb. nov. [bas.: Phaeotrema vulcani Hale], Stegobolus anamorphoides (Nyl.) Lücking, comb. nov. [bas.: Thelotrema anamorphoides Nyl.], Stegobolus lankaensis (Hale) Lücking, comb. nov. [bas.: Ocellularia lankaensis Hale], Thelotrema jugale (Müll. Arg.) Lücking, comb. nov. [bas.: Ocellularia jugalis Müll. Arg.], and Wirthiotrema desquamans (Müll. Arg.) Lücking, comb. nov. [bas.: Anthracothecium desquamans Müll. Arg.]. All species are described and discussed in detail and illustrated by photographic plates, and keys are provided to genera and species.
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... Burnet O'Connor, close to Soledad, old road between Entre Ríos and Chuquisaca, 21º39'45"S, 64º07'22"W, 1750 m, Boliviano-Tucumano forest with shrubs and Alnus acuminata, on Alnus acuminata, 31 July 2015, M. Kukwa 16939a (LPB, UGDA). Lücking & N. Salazar So far reported from Brazil, Costa Rica, Panama and Venezuela Sipman et al. 2012;Lima et al. 2016). ...
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