Article

Compositional analysis of major saponins and anti-inflammatory activitiy of steam-processed platycodi radix under pressure

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Abstract

Platycosides are the saponins in Platycodi Radix and they have several beneficial effects such as anti-inflammatory and anti-obesity activities. This study was designed to determine the changes in the saponin composition in Platycodi Radix (platycosides) after being processed under steam and pressure and to investigate the anti-inflammatory effects of their extracts. The change of the platycoside compositions was investigated after 1, 2, 3, 6 and 9h heat processing of Platycodi Radices by using HPLC coupled with an evaporative light scattering detection (ELSD) system. After heat treatment (125 °C, 1, 2, 3, 6 and 9 h), the contents of several platycosides such as platycoside E, platycodin D3, platycodin D, polygalacin D, and platycodin A decreased as the processing time was longer. While the total contents of the saponins decreased, the contents of deapi-forms of deapi-platycoside E, deapi-platycodin D3, and deapi-platycodin D increased relatively. These results indicate that the linkage between apiose and xylose located at C-28 is labile to heat and pressure. The LPS-induced iNOS inhibitory activities of the samples treated for 1 and 2 hours were enhanced and after then, the activities were reduced. These results suggested that heat treatment of the samples affect the content of the total saponins and the saponin content may be the important criteria representing the anti-inflammatory activity.

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... Platycoside analysis HPLC chromatograms of puffed and non-puffed doraji with the same moisture content of 6.0 g of water/100 g of doraji at different puffing pressures are shown in Fig. 5. Levels of platycosides were reduced after the puffing process to a nearly undetectable level at (27). It was shown that the linkage between sugars at C-28 is easily degraded by heat and pressure (28). In this study, HPLC analysis indicated that the puffing process may cleave C-28 residues, resulting in decreased levels of platycosides. ...
... The platycoside contents in doraji puffed at 980 kPa were much lower than in non-puffed doraji. The result was in agreement with a report that the platycoside composition was changed by processing under steam and pressure (28). In this study, the puffing pressure was a major factor that affected the extraction yield, crude saponin content, platycoside content, and antioxidant activity. ...
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