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Incorporating EconTalk podcasts into the principles classroom

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Abstract

This short educational note describes how to incorporate EconTalk podcasts into a principles course. A list of specific podcasts is included, along with the applicable chapters from Economics: Private and Public Choice by Gwartney, Stroup, Sobel, and Macpherson.

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... The pedagogical literature over the past two decades is increasingly supportive of teaching techniques that creatively depart from the traditional chalk and talk. Luther (2015) discusses using episodes from NPR's planet money to engage students in introductory macroeconomics; Hall (2012) and Moryl (2013) highlight the pedagogical value of podcasts in the economics classroom. More recently, Vidal (2020b) provides a curated list of podcasts that could be used in a typical introduction to macroeconomics class, while Coon and Vidal (2021) describe the use of podcasts to teach supply and demand. ...
... In direct reference and influence to this article, Hall (2012) uses EconTalk podcasts to teach introductory economics while Luther (2014) uses NPR's Planet Money to teach Principles of Macroeconomics. Moryl (2013Moryl ( , 2014 describes and studies the validity, applicability, and value of the use of podcasts to teach undergraduate economics in great detail. ...
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... The continuously updated library includes links to popular podcasts like Freakonomics or Planet Money and are linked to topics in a traditional principles textbook. Other researchers have looked specifically at using EconTalk with Russ Roberts (Hall, 2012) or NPR's Planet Money (Luther, 2015) in teaching economics at the principles level. Similar to the introduction of student-generated music videos, student-generated podcasting assignments (Moryl, 2016) allow students to apply their economic proficiency and create some deliverable, which the American Economic Association would perhaps believe satisfies their goal of having undergraduate students be able to present and discuss economics broadly. ...
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