Article

Fampridine-SR: A potassium-channel blocker for the improvement of walking ability in patients with MS

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Abstract

Fampridine-SR is a sustained-release oral medication that is pending FDA approval for the symptomatic treatment of multiple sclerosis (MS). Fampridine (4-aminopyridine) is a potassium-channel blocker that has been demonstrated to improve impulse conduction in nerve fibers in which myelin has been damaged, a hallmark of MS. Although fampridine-SR is not a disease-modifying therapy, this agent does offer a novel approach to target MS symptoms, specifically walking ability and lower-extremity strength. A recent phase 3 trial in patients with various types of MS demonstrated that fampridine-SR is associated with clinically meaningful improvements in some patients regardless of concomitant therapy. If approved by FDA, fampridine-SR would be the first drug specifically indicated for the improvement of walking ability in patients with MS.

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Article
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