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Motivation project-based learning: Sustaining the doing, supporting the learning

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Abstract

Project-based learning is a comprehensive approach to classroom teaching and learning that is designed to engage students in investigation of authentic problems. In this article, we present an argument for why projects have the potential to help people learn; indicate factors in project design that affect motivation and thought; examine difficulties that students and teachers may encounter with projects; and describe how technology can support students and teachers as they work on projects, so that motivation and thought are sustained.

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... The roots of Project Based Learning (PBL) meet with John Dewey's philosophy of "learning by doing" and is also reflected in the theories of constructivism [6], [7] Within the framework of PBL, students are provided with opportunities to work on projects that are relevant to the real world, besides involving investigation, conversations and collaboration with peers. The process encourages students to construct their new knowledge by engaging in meaningful complex project tasks and also offers social learning platforms [6], [8], [9], [10], [11]. Furthermore, PBL captivates students' interest and promotes students' engagement by offering a diverse range of real life working projects that takes care of the students' choices as well [8]. ...
... The process encourages students to construct their new knowledge by engaging in meaningful complex project tasks and also offers social learning platforms [6], [8], [9], [10], [11]. Furthermore, PBL captivates students' interest and promotes students' engagement by offering a diverse range of real life working projects that takes care of the students' choices as well [8]. ...
... Within the framework of PBL, students are provided with opportunities to work on projects that are authentic, relevant to the real world; besides involving investigation, conversations and collaboration with peers. The process encourages students to construct their new knowledge by engaging in meaningful complex real life projects in social learning environment [6], [8], [12]. Another dominant view of constructivism is the way cultural and social context is embedded in the cognition process, pronouncing learning is not something stored in the head but is distributed in the social environment. ...
... Smart learning requires, among other things, learner-centred instructional tools, able to sustain student motivation, collaborative and application and content-focused [1]. Among the learning methods that are considered learnercentred and support collaboration is Project-based learning (PjBL) [2] - [3]. Compared to other instructional methods, PjBL has several proven advantages; for example, LaForce, Noble and Blackwell [4] argued that PjBL impact positively students' attitudes and interests in the subject matter. ...
... Student motivation can also be improved by focusing on what type of challenges the students will face during the project implementation. According to Blumenfeld, Soloway, Marx, Krajcik, Guzdial and Palincsar [2], authentic project tasks are also thought to promote students' motivation. ...
... Involving students in the production of authentic products provided students with a chance to understand the practical implications of managing the project from a life cycle perspective. This is in line with Blumenfeld, Soloway, Marx, Krajcik, Guzdial and Palincsar [2] that all activities should be designed to achieve an important intellectual purpose. Experiencing the project's life cycle seems to have a considerable impact on student motivation far more than grading. ...
... Project-based learning is related to inquiry-based learning, and actively engages students in the process of investigating a problem (Aditomo et al., 2013). Driven by a question or problem, project-related activities result in a product or artefact that addresses that question or problem (Blumenfeld et al., 1991), often in the form of a written report. Projects may be part of a capstone unit of study, where students integrate and employ the disciplinary content they learnt during their study program, or they can be broader and more interdisciplinary, with a focus on developing generic skills (Helle et al., 2006). ...
... Research questions used in interdisciplinary project-based learning are authentic, relating to real-world and complex problems. This can improve students' motivation to engage with the task, since they are able to situate their work within both their personal experiences, and the context of contemporary research in the discipline (Blumenfeld et al., 1991;Spronken-Smith & Walker, 2010;Zafra-Gómez et al., 2015). Moreover, contemporary problems need interdisciplinary solutions, so interdisciplinary project-based learning is used to develop both discipline and employability skills. ...
... In line with findings of previous project-based learning reviews, the primary data in this field are limited to narrative course descriptions and anecdotal evaluations (Guo et al., 2020;Hart, 2019;Helle et al., 2006). Most projects are designed with a research framework and align with a projectbased learning description (Blumenfeld et al., 1991), but the literature consists largely of course descriptions rather than educational research. Evaluations described were often anecdotal with little hard evidence to substantiate the claims, and the pedagogical framework was poorly articulated in many cases (Guo et al., 2020;Hart, 2019;Helle et al., 2006). ...
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Interdisciplinary projects are reported to facilitate the development of both disciplinary and generic skills. They vary in their design and implementation, but the effectiveness of different project models has not been studied. The aim of this study was to determine student satisfaction, engagement with learning and development of employability skills across interdisciplinary projects with different delivery models. This scoping review appraises interdisciplinary projects implemented in science-based undergraduate degree programs. Projects with varying models of delivery, interdisciplinarity, authenticity and external partner involvement were examined, and the reported student learning and satisfaction ratings compared. Descriptive statistics and cross tabulation using Fisher’s Exact test were used to analyse the data. The interdisciplinary project model had little effect on engagement with learning, but student satisfaction improved if the project task was rated as authentic (p<0.05). Improved learning was reported in about half of the projects reviewed. Improved employability was reported in projects where students used discipline-based skills to provide a consultancy (p<0.05), and those where an external partner was involved (p<0.05). The interdisciplinary project model did not affect disciplinary or employability skill development, apart from interdisciplinary competence, which was significantly improved in a truly interdisciplinary project (p<0.01). Interpersonal skill development was significantly improved where projects had integrated rather than sequential tasks (p<0.05). Overall, interdisciplinary projects that were authentic and/or involved an external partner generated better student satisfaction and real-world experience. These results inform the future design of interdisciplinary project-based learning tasks and encourage involvement of external partners in project design and delivery.
... In higher education, project-based learning (PjBL) has been widely promoted, especially in senior years of undergraduate studies, where students are encouraged to learn by working with authentic projects and creating tangible products or artifacts closer to professional reality [6]. The core idea of PjBL is to have students actively engage in meaningful learning with authentic projects or real-world problems to integrate knowing and doing and develop agency over the learning process [7,8]. ...
... However, there is concern that PjBL involves complex processes that require higher-order thinking skills, making it difficult to sustain effective learning with projects. While students in PjBL are expected to take a high level of responsibility for their learning, many students have difficulties completing a real-world project [4,7,[10][11][12][13]. The challenge can be more serious for low-achieving students, who often have inadequate skills to complete a project. ...
... Students in PjBL need to produce solutions to nontrivial problems by investigating problems, exploring solutions, drawing conclusions, and creating artifacts in a variety of forms [9]. Many students have difficulties completing these complex activities without the necessary support; meanwhile, teachers reported to experience challenges in designing PjBL curricula and in supporting students during PjBL, for example assessing students' progress, diagnosing their problems, and providing feedback to students [4,7,10,11,13,14]. As a result, PjBL is often not fully implemented in educational practices [9]. ...
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Project-based learning, in which students engage in meaningful learning with authentic projects and building agency and autonomy for sustainable learning, has been increasingly promoted in higher education. However, completing an authentic project involves a complex process, which may pose challenges to many students, especially low-achievers. This study incorporated computer-based scaffolding into a project-based programming course to make complex project learning accessible to students. The scaffolding was designed based on the four-component instructional design (4C/ID) model. The results show that with the support of computer-based scaffolding, all participants maintained a high level of motivation during the course. At the end of the course, their performance was improved by 35.49% in product quality and 38.98% in subject knowledge; their programming thinking skills were improved by 20.91% in problem understanding, 21.86% in modular design, and 25.70% in process design. Despite academic achievement discrepancies among the participants at the beginning of the course, low-achievers’ post-study performance in product quality and programming thinking skills became similar to that of high-achievers, and their post-study performance in subject knowledge became similar to that of medium-achievers. The findings reveal the promising role of computer-based scaffolding in making complex learning with real-world projects accomplishable by a wide range of students and reducing the gaps between high- and low-achieving students.
... Project-based learning is a comprehensive approach to classroom teaching and learning designed to involve students in the investigation of authentic problems (Phyllis et al., 1991). It has been studied in various contexts and at different stages of education, from primary to tertiary education (Grant and Branch, 2015;Holubova, 2008). ...
... In a study by Chen & Yang (2019), the effects of PBL and teachers' direct instruction on students' academic achievement in primary, secondary, and higher education were compared. The results showed that PBL has a more positive effect on students' academic achievement than direct instruction (Blumenfeld et al., 1991;Helle, Tynjälä, & Olkinuora, 2006). However, it turned out that only 20% (6 out of 30) of the studies reviewed were conducted in higher education. ...
... There are six distinctive features of PBL, including focus on learning objectives, participation in educational activities, collaboration between students, use of scaffolding technologies, and creation of tangible works. Among all these features, the creation of authentic problem-solving works, which distinguishes PBL from other student-centered pedagogies, for example problem-based learning, is the most important (Blumenfeld et al., 1991;Helle, Tynjälä, & Olkinuora, 2006). This creation process requires learners to work together to find solutions to unique problems in the process of knowledge integration, application and construction. ...
Article
In this study, the effect of the project-based learning approach applied in the 6th grade music lessons of the secondary school on the students' learning outcomes and their attitudes towards the music lesson was examined. The study was carried out according to the pretest-posttest design with a control group, which is one of the semi-experimental models. The experimental and control groups of the study consisted of 44 (22+22) 6th grade students in secondary school. In the collection of study data, secondary school 6th grade music acquisition test and attitude scales towards music lesson were used. In the experimental group, the project-based learning approach was applied, and in the control group, experimental procedures were applied for 6 weeks in accordance with the instructions of the secondary school 6th grade music lesson curriculum of the Ministry of National Education. In the study, research measurement tools were applied to the experimental and control groups as pretest, posttest and retention test. According to the research findings, students in the experimental group to whom project-based learning approaches were applied achieved significantly higher music lesson achievements, attitudes and retention scores compared to their peers in the control groups.
... Márgenes, Revista de Educación de la Universidad de Málaga,4(1), 135-153. Año 2023 expectación e incertidumbre (Monson, 2019;Blumenfeld et al 1991). Finalmente, si siempre es bueno comenzar el despliegue del aprendizaje evidenciando que la desigualdad importa (Edwars, 2010), más lo es en el sistema cooperativo, donde muchas de las interacciones del alummado quedan al margen del escrutinio del profesorado. ...
... Así las cosas, la dinámica que se presenta en el apartado 3, desplegada el primer día de clase, busca evidenciar ante el alumnado las claves de la lógica cooperativa desde la experiencia. Y, además, busca hacerlo activando la motivación, que de acuerdo con Blumenfeld et al (1991) es clave en este modelo. Ahora bien, la lógica cooperativa debe considerar que el género importa en las aulas y también se expresa en la forma en que trabajan en grupos. ...
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Este texto pretende hacer frente a dos retos de la Educación superior: centrar el marco del aprendizaje en el alumnado y hacerlo con una perspectiva de género. Situado en la intersección de ambas aspiraciones, se busca aportar herramientas que hagan visible al alumnado las lógicas sobre las que descansa un aprendizaje cooperativo que aborde las desigualdades de género en las aulas. Para ello, el primer contacto con el alumnado en la presentación de una asignatura se antoja un momento clave porque los estudios demuestran cómo las primeras horas en la docencia de una asignatura influyen la motivación para aprender a lo largo del curso. Desde esta atalaya, y tras delimitar los elementos nucleares del aprendizaje centrado en el alumnado y la perspectiva de género aplicada a educación superior, se describe una experiencia implementada las dos primeras horas de presentación de una asignatura del primer curso de Sociología y Ciencia Política que, asentada en una batería de técnicas activas en las que la emoción, el simbolismo y la confianza es clave, permite desde el primer contacto (i) evidenciar las desigualdades en el aula, (ii) enmarcar la metodología y algunos de los contenidos centrales de la asignatura, y (iii) vivenciar desde la práctica el sentido de lo político. Entendido el aprendizaje como un proceso político en el que la cooperación es esencial, este texto presenta un modelo en el que la centralidad está en un alumnado que al que se aspira a motivar para ser protagonista de su aprendizaje en igualdad.
... Students need opportunities to engage in discipline specific practices, while at the same time recognizing and understanding how the individual disciplinary knowledge, skills, and practices support and inform each other. Problem-and project-based approaches (Barron et al., 1998;Blumenfeld et al., 1991;Hmelo-Silver, 2004) are commonly used in integrated STEM education. Both problem-and project-based learning approaches focus on providing learning experiences that incorporate inquiry, problem-solving, creativity, and other 21st Century (Partnership for 21st Century Skills, 2011) skills to design solutions to an openended question, problem, or challenge (Blumenfeld et al., 1991;Roth 2001). ...
... Problem-and project-based approaches (Barron et al., 1998;Blumenfeld et al., 1991;Hmelo-Silver, 2004) are commonly used in integrated STEM education. Both problem-and project-based learning approaches focus on providing learning experiences that incorporate inquiry, problem-solving, creativity, and other 21st Century (Partnership for 21st Century Skills, 2011) skills to design solutions to an openended question, problem, or challenge (Blumenfeld et al., 1991;Roth 2001). Students work collaboratively, utilize multiple tools, and collect and analyze various data sources to solve the question, problem, or challenge. ...
Article
Over the last two decades, discussions, rhetoric, recommendations, and policies regarding K-12 1 STEM education have escalated among businesses and industry, policy makers, think tanks, and educators around the world. STEM education is cast as pivotal in increasing productivity, prosperity, and global competitiveness; as a lynchpin in addressing current and future socio-geo-political-economic challenges; as a panacea for filling shortages in workforce pipelines. In this commentary, we discuss the emergence of STEM acronym, its variants, and the rhetoric surrounding STEM that drives educational policy. We examine more closely the integration of STEM and present an example of how in our own work, we have begun to clarify the characteristics of integrated STEM that guide our projects. We summarize some of the research studies in the emerging field of integrated STEM that document its benefits and reflect on the opportunities afforded STEM educators for future research. This commentary is by no means exhaustive, but is intended to instigate thought, reflection, and progress regarding the nascent state of integrating the STEM disciplines.
... Moreover, when individuals are intrinsically motivated, they are more creative (Amabile, 1983;Amabile et al., 1986;Reeve & Deci, 1996). PBL allows students to take greater responsibility for their own learning and previous research has suggested that PBL might have a positive effect on student motivation (Blumenfeld et al., 1991;Weiss, 2016). This assumption is due to the fact that students are autonomous to drive their collaborative process to investigate the constitutive problem of the PBL framework and that this requires students' effort over an extended period (Blumenfeld et al., 1991). ...
... PBL allows students to take greater responsibility for their own learning and previous research has suggested that PBL might have a positive effect on student motivation (Blumenfeld et al., 1991;Weiss, 2016). This assumption is due to the fact that students are autonomous to drive their collaborative process to investigate the constitutive problem of the PBL framework and that this requires students' effort over an extended period (Blumenfeld et al., 1991). This mechanism is likely to increase student intrinsic motivation (Douglass & Morris, 2014). ...
Article
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During the first lockdown due to Covid-19 pandemic, project-based learning (PBL) had to be implemented remotely. To gain knowledge on this learning context, we monitored motivation (in Self-Determination Theory framework), flow, social identification and self-rated performance during a 10-day project conducted with 281 engineering students. Final grades were also collected as objective performance indicators. Results show that intrinsic and identified motivation, flow, self-rated performance and group identification increased throughout the project, which suggests that remote PBL stimulated students' needs for autonomy and competence without hindering their need for relatedness. Furthermore, the analysis of significant predictors of teams' and individuals' performance draw avenues for improving PBL and stimulating intrinsic and identified motivation, for the subject and for the project, at the right time along the program.
... Thus, as teachers we need to generate more motivationally supportive environments. Recent decades have witnessed a growing interest in project-based learning (PjBL) as a way to create more student-centered approaches and to foster motivation in students and teachers alike (Blumenfeld et al., 1991). ...
... During the project, students create a final artefact using research strategies, which lead them to perceive their work as personally meaningful (Larmer & Mergendoller, 2010;Wurdinger et al., 2007). According to Blumenfeld et al. (1991), project work consists of two fundamental components: a driving question that serves to guide the project and a final product that addresses the driving question. ...
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This article aims to describe and analyze the dilemmas facing teachers when fostering student motivation in project-based learning (PjBL). The authors developed a project in secondary education through an action research approach. The different action research cycles aimed to solve dilemmas throughout the project and interpret them in terms of student motivation through the self-determination theory. According to this theory, autonomy, relatedness and competence are three psychological needs that, if fulfilled in the classroom, will lead to greater intrinsic motivation. The results revealed that one of the main characteristics of PjBL, namely, presenting the final product to an external audience, led to a tight schedule. This time-pressure context generated the majority of dilemmas, which affected the development of the three basic psychological needs, especially competence and autonomy.
... According to the literature (Blumenfeld et al., 1991;Chen & Yang, 2019;Krajcik et al., 2008;Markula & Aksela, 2022;Rivet & Krajcik, 2008;Rogers et al., 2011), PBL advocates learning in contextualized, authentic situations in which students are required to engage in group work and sustained inquiry, and to accomplish a product that develops content knowledge and critical thinking. Although PBL has become or is becoming, an important direction for curriculum reform, frontline teachers may encounter challenges when implementing it. ...
... Although PBL has become or is becoming, an important direction for curriculum reform, frontline teachers may encounter challenges when implementing it. These challenges lie in the requirement for teachers to master additional, previously unknown knowledge and skills (Han et al., 2015b), embrace a constructivist and student-centered philosophy and have a positive, receptive attitude towards this emerging pedagogical approach (Blumenfeld et al., 1991;Mentzer et al., 2017;Rogers et al., 2011;Tamim & Grant, 2013). Previous research has shown that there exists a potential gap between PBL as understood by teachers and that defined in the documents (Tamim & Grant, 2013), the latter of which can be interpreted as the expected and ideal PBL. ...
Article
As an important approach to learning and teaching, project-based learning (PBL) addressed in new curriculum reform at the middle school level in China raises the need for change in teachers’ beliefs, since teachers’ beliefs are important factors that influence their acceptance, adaptation, and implementation of PBL. Using qualitative content analysis, this study examined 23 prospective teachers’ (PTs) perceived beliefs shifts through participating in a systematic PBL program at a university. Data were collected from two open questionnaires for pre- and post-tests, respectively, which were about the beliefs about the nature of mathematics (BNM), beliefs about learning mathematics (BLM), and beliefs about teaching mathematics (BTM). The results revealed that PTs’ beliefs about BNM, BLM, and BTM were significantly shifted from the instrumentalist view or the Platonist view to the problem-solving view and that their shifts in BNM positively influenced the shifts in BLM and BTM. The implication for teachers’ professional development is that transforming teachers’ beliefs through systematic training on the theory and practice of PBL is feasible before implementing pedagogical innovations featuring PBL on a large scale.
... The ERTM was ASCEND's foundational, evidence-based model for nurturing an entrepreneurial research mindset through scaffolding, peer support, and motivation to engage in a student organization dedicated to building a culture of undergraduate research [15][16][17][18][19][20][21][22][23]. This model was developed as a step-by-step approach to scaffold the growth of undergraduate students toward assuming leadership roles in research. ...
... Students often lose interest when their first exposure to research is perceived as being too difficult [21]. Through reflective and project-based learning, students examine their issues of interest and learn as they develop their future research projects [16,32]. In the ERTM, newcomers go through a gradual orientation, starting first by meeting like-minded peers with slightly more experience to create a more pleasant, welcoming, and relaxing the first impression. ...
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Much is told regarding the need for greater diversity in the biomedical research workforce in terms of race, ethnicity, and socioeconomic status. However, there are few evidence-based models that are tested and can have significant effects in this regard. Thus, there is a need for development and evaluation of innovative models that may help train a more diverse biomedical research workforce. In this study, we provided the rationale, conceptual model, and preliminary evaluation of a program called “A Student-Centered Entrepreneurship Development (ASCEND)”. This training program was designed, implemented, and evaluated between 2017 and 2020 at Morgan State University, Baltimore, Maryland, United States. The program’s conceptual model is based on four stages: Attraction and Inspiration, Ideation and Innovation, Research Implementation, and Career Growth. Results of the comparative survey between 50 students who participated in ASCEND and 86 non-member controls showed an increase in science identity, academic self-concept, science self-efficacy, and peer support. The only domain that did not show a larger increase in participants in our program compared to controls was social self-concept. In addition, a total of 59 students submitted 48 research concepts, and 16 undergraduate student projects were funded. Of participants in the Health Research Concepts Competition, 39 students graduated, and 13 were pursuing graduate programs in STEM fields at the time of evaluation. The number of research projects and trainees who started a graduate degree were also reported. The ASCEND training model fosters an entrepreneurial mindset among undergraduate students. Such a program might be effective in diversifying the biomedical research workforce. While this preliminary evaluation indicates the efficacy of the ASCEND model, there is a need for further long-term and multi-center evaluations with the trainees’ research productivity and receipt of independent funding as outcomes.
... 1. Problém -nastolenie daného problému. Blumenfeld (1991) tvrdí, že dobrý žiacky projekt by mal byť postavený na autentickom probléme. Vďaka využitiu prvkov Problem based learning sa žiaci učia analyzovať, rozhodovať, vytvoriť vlastný názor a riešiť dané problémy v oblasti EVVO. ...
... La metodología PBL se ha utilizado en algunos programas de ingeniería como una alternativa para apoyar estas inquietudes. Estas experiencias anteriores han establecido cinco momentos importantes de aprendizaje cuando se prepara una actividad tipo PBL en ingeniería (Blumenfeld et al., 1991;Krajcik, Blumenfeld, Marx & Soloway, 1994;Krajcik, Czerniak, Czerniak y Berger, 2003): (1) Comienza con un problema práctico planteado que los estudiantes deben resolver. (2) Una vez que se ha planteado el problema, los estudiantes intercambian ideas basadas en conceptos de la disciplina. ...
Article
La Elasticidad y Resistencia de Materiales (ERM) es una disciplina impartida en muchos grados de ingeniería. Esta asignatura necesita que los alumnos presenten una actitud participativa durante el proceso de aprendizaje, debido a su complejidad e importancia a lo largo del grado. Sin embargo, los estudiantes la encuentran muy complicada y abstracta. Por tanto, la principal dificultad que encuentra el profesor a la hora de enseñar es mantener el interés y motivación de los alumnos durante el proceso de aprendizaje. Para ayudar en esta tarea, los profesores deben ayudarse de nuevas metodologías como el aprendizaje basado en problemas y la clase inversa, donde se facilita la información a los estudiantes previamente a la clase presencial. En este trabajo, se presenta la aplicación de un aprendizaje basado en problemas al laboratorio de ERM en el grado de Ingeniería Mecánica. Además, para aumentar el entusiasmo y la motivación de los estudiantes, estas sesiones de laboratorio incluyeron una tecnología de fabricación innovadora, impresión 3D, y el empleo de correlación de imágenes digitales (DIC) para medida de desplazamientos y deformaciones. Antes de cada sesión práctica, se animaba a los alumnos a visualizar un vídeo online con los aspectos fundamentales de la práctica. Para evaluar el éxito de esta metodología, después de terminar las sesiones de laboratorio, los estudiantes respondieron una encuesta cuantitativa no formal. Los resultados mostraron que el aprendizaje basado en problemas propuesto tenía la capacidad de ayudar a integrar los conocimientos y mejorar la adquisición de las competencias incluidas en la guía docente de la asignatura. Aunque estos resultados son alentadores, todavía hay partes de la actividad de laboratorio que deben mejorarse para que la actividad consuma menos tiempo y facilitar las partes más complejas para los estudiantes. /// Elasticity and Strength of Materials is an elementary discipline across many engineering degrees. Students perceive it as very difficult and abstract and students’ active participation in the learning process is needed, due to its complexity and importance during the whole degree years. Hence, the main difficulty in teaching them is maintaining students' motivation and keeping their participation in the learning process. This is the reason to use new tools, such as problem-based learning (PBL) and flipped classroom, to help students understand and study the subject. In this work, we present the application of a problem-based learning to the lab in the Mechanical engineering degree, in of one the most time-consuming and difficult subjects of its program. Moreover, to enhance students’ enthusiasm and motivation, these sessions included an innovative manufacturing technology, 3D printing, and digital image correlation (DIC). Before each practical session, the students are encouraged to watch an online video with the fundamental aspects. In order to assess the success of this laboratory course, after finishing the lab sessions, the students answered a non-formal quantitative survey. The results showed that the proposed project-based learning had the ability to help integrating the knowledge and improve the skills included in the main competences. Although these results are encouraging, there are still parts of the lab activity that should be improve in order to make the activity less time consuming and the most difficult part being easier for the students.
... In theoretical courses, knowledge is transferred among a sizable group through lectures that may also include debates. The demands of students and the job prospects throughout time compelled modifications in the educational system (Blumenfeld et al., 1991). The practical aspect had been given precedence. ...
Article
The evaluation of information systems (IS) models, which are employed to research the adoption or acceptance of metaverse systems, is thought to be a subject of major significance. Studying the adoption or acceptability of the metaverse system is not a recent study area, and many academics have taken on the task. We should be acquainted with the leading IS models used in this study trend to assess these models and give academics a comprehensive understanding of this study trend. The primary goal of this research, in contrast to previous reviews, is to systematically evaluate the metaverse research in education from the viewpoint of IS theories/models to offer a thorough pointer that might help the scholars to carry out additional research in metaverse acceptance. A total of 41 research that was published between 2011 and 2022 were examined in the present systematic review. The main study results showed that the Technology Acceptance Model (TAM) is recognized as the most widely used model in forecasting people’s intentions to uphold the metaverse system. Furthermore, it was discovered that SmartPLS (PLS-SEM) is a typical tool for validating metaverse models. In addition, the key research purpose covered in the bulk of the reviewed research is to study how students adopt or accept the metaverse system and the technology that supports it. Additionally, most of the research that was gathered was done in China, Taiwan, and the USA, accordingly. Additionally, in most of the evaluated research, it was discovered that university students were the primary respondents concerning data acquisition. These findings are anticipated to significantly improve both our comprehension of metaverse system study and the utilization of IS models.
... The lack of consensus about the necessity of student collaboration and student initiation of projects reflects a more significant imprecision about the definition of PjBL itself. Historically, "project methods" in higher education have involved "the solution of a problem; often, though not necessarily, set by the student himself" leading "commonly" to "an end product" such as a thesis, report, design plan, or computer program (Adderley 1975, p. 1;cited in Helle, Tynjälä, & Olkinuora, 2006, p. 288; see also Blumenfeld et al., 1991). Blurring of definitions between problem-based and project-based learning remains common (Helle, Tynjälä, & Olkinuora, 2006;Wurdinger, Haar, Hugg, & Bezon, 2007;English & Kitsantas, 2013), though some scholars find it useful to distinguish between them (Wheeler, 2008;Wurdinger & Rudolph, 2009). ...
... This learning paradigm is a subset of experiential learning, as reported by Blumenfeld et al. (1991), where students are required to shift their focus from memorization to the application of what they learn. A beneficial consequence of this shift is that they engage more parts of the brain, in according to Zull (2002). ...
Article
Preparing students for the workforce is a balancing act that involves theory, practice, and assessment. As students navigate an educational experience that is, however, often distant from real-world needs, it is imperative that academia finds a novel way to bridge the gap. As many organizations utilize open challenges to attract ideas and talent, academia can easily create such bridge, leading to greater engagement, greater student preparation, and a potential employment pipeline. This paper describes the experience of our students and faculty advisors who participated to the NASA SUITS (Spacesuit User Interface Technologies for Students) Design Challenge. In particular, we review the pedagogical value of the solution that they created and the changes that were implemented in the curriculum of an undergraduate degree program in Information Technology. This open-source, multi-year project is also a flexible platform that can be utilized for engagement in K-12 education as well as graduate research projects.
... An essential part of any project is the creation of artefacts, which are external representations of students' constructed knowledge (Krajcik & Blumenfeld, 2006). The artefacts are the project outcomes and result from students' investigations into the driving questions (Blumenfeld et al., 1991). An artefact can be a tangible product, a solution or a report, among other things. ...
Article
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The article focuses on study visits from the perspective of mathematical project work. Project work means a systematic organizing method of teaching that is based around a project. The research questions are the kinds of study visits students made, the meaning(s) of those visits, the mathematical content in the visits and how such study visits should be developed. The research material consists of two questionnaires (one for teachers and one for companies) and a case study of a student group that carried out two study visits as part of their mathematical project work. The results show that both teachers and companies considered study visits to be significant from their own standpoints. The teachers organize study visits, but the content of the visits is not usually connected with activities in the classroom.
... Keywords: project-based learning, middle school, teaching methodologies, Uruguay, faculty development implementación del abp en uruguay Corea y Lewkowicz (2004), Merritt y sus colegas (2017) y Thomas (2000) sugieren que, para una buena implementación del ABP, son importantes el diseño de buenos problemas/proyectos, los grupos pequeños de trabajo, el proceso de investigación frecuente centrado en el estudiante, la comunicación de hallazgos al grupo, los recursos, la tecnología y la asociación con la comunidad. Otros componentes fundamentales son que el rol de los docentes sea el de facilitadores (Condliffe, et al., 2017;Holm, 2011;Thomas, 2000) y que todos los actores involucrados sientan la necesidad de un cambio (Barron et al.,1998;Blumenfeld et al., 1991;Duncan & Tseng, 2010). ...
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El aprendizaje basado en proyectos (ABP) es una metodología centrada en el alumno poco común en los centros educativos de Uruguay. Esta investigación midió la percepción de los estudiantes sobre la implementación de ABP y documentó los éxitos y retos de los profesores durante la misma. Los datos demostraron una implementación exitosa; sin embargo, los docentes enfrentaron retos como la calidad de la capacitación, la actitud de resistencia de algunos docentes, la inexperiencia de los estudiantes con la metodología, la presión del profesor por cubrir contenido, y problemas de infraestructura y conexión a Internet.
... Maximizing the learning of language, content, and real-life skills require teacher guidance, feedback, student engagement, and elaborated tasks with some degree of challenges (Alan & Stoller,2005). The element of novelty and authenticity of the project give students the opportunity to develop their innovation and higher-order thinking skills as Blumenfeld et al., (1991) stated that the project could be meaningful, and cognitively engaging if the design considers various tasks and unique elements. Above all, the portrayed dimension of teaching and learning require teachers to assume a new role as facilitators and commit to student learning. ...
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This research is a comparative study focusing on students’ writing ability in two different languages. In this case, Indonesian language as a first language (mother tongue) taught formally in elementary school up to university and English language as a second language (foreign language) taught formally in junior high school up to university. The research aims to know the students' ability to write descriptive texts in two different languages and comparing them at the same time. The research is quantitative research, where the data analyzed quantitatively. The research subject was the students who passed certain English subjects, namely writing I, writing II, writing III, and writing IV and Indonesian language subject, namely scientific work subject written in the Indonesian language taught in the first semester. The data was gained from the third-year students in the sixth semester of the English education department of Muhammadiyah University of Parepare through the writing test. The result of the research gave the description and comparison of the writing ability in two different languages at the same time based on the writing assessment rubric.
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Project-Based Learning (PBL), referred to as Project-Based Language Learning (PBLL) when students learn a second or foreign language through project work, is a growing field of research worldwide. Since the 1980s, PBLL has been empirically studied in numerous contexts: in K-12 and higher education settings, multiple target languages, and many regions and countries. However, as the number of PBLL studies has increased, the need for analyzing PBLL research on a global scale and through regional and country-level analyses has become of high importance. Through a case study review of countries with strong PBLL research, regional and global research trends, as well as gaps, can be identified, while areas that have been amply researched can be satisfactorily concluded. This paper will discuss findings based on a case study of PBLL in Turkey, Greece, and Cyprus, which were part of a larger global study on PBLL research (Beckett et al., 2020). We will highlight PBLL studies within the region, identifying regional trends in K-12 and higher education research, multi-country projects, and research gaps in technology and assessment, which are seen as gaps in PBLL research worldwide (Beckett and Slater., 2020).
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Quite often, developers face low performance, hanging, and other problems when they’re developing sites. To solve such problems, we need to trace site requests. Existing tracing methods do not allow tracing the progress of requests from a client’s web browser to a server or group of servers. In this paper, we propose distributed tracing mechanism that allows tracking requests starting from the browser. For generating complete client-to-server tracing, the client application must be able to initiate the appropriate request. For the execution of these actions, we need to use a unique library. In the paper, we consider the algorithm of such a library. A popular tracer (OpenTracing) is used on the serverside. Based on the proposed methodology, a library was developed. The library's work was tested. Testing has shown that using the library, and we can track the complete chain of requests from a browser to the server. Trace result is presented in graphical view. This allows analyzing received data and finding bottlenecks when queries are passing. The novelty of the proposed solution is that the request is traced from the client application and to the client application. That is, the full path of the request is shown. The result is presented in a graphical form that is convenient for analysis. The library is designed primarily for the development of client-server applications and for support services.
Chapter
In the changing world with technology, differences and new expansions are seen in the education structure. The purpose of this study is to evaluate design education and the design process in terms of Web 2.0 software and social media application. In this context, studies on the structure of social media in education have been examined. As a methodology of the study, document analysis and descriptive research method, among the qualitative analysis methods, were used to reveal the subject's current state. As a result of the study, it was determined that social media contributes positively to education, as in every field, and changes the learning structure of students. In addition to the contributions such as the ease of access to information in design education, it has been observed that there may be negative consequences such as the loss of the original structure in design and deterioration in the professional culture.
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Emotional-enhanced learning is a meaningful driver of engagement leading to long-term memory retention in learners, however, traditional approaches such as problem-based learning, and project-based learning, among others, do not consider brain-based learning guidelines concerning learner’s emotional experience design. The Neuroscience-based Learning (NBL) technique is a novel neuro-educational approach that applies the implicit neuro-physiological mechanisms underlying vivid and highly-arousal emotion-al experiences leading to long-term memory retention. The NBL is devised from a cybernetic system point of view, by explaining the novel neuro-physiological learning scheme describing the relation among the environment and the learner’s internal mental processes ranging from perceptions, comparison with previous experiences and memories, immediate sensations and reactions, emotions, desires, intentions, higher order cognitive functions, and controlled actions towards the environment. While explaining biological processes, the scheme also relates the types of memory systems with their non-associative and associative learning mechanisms, and the variables that modulate learning. NBL proposes the triggers for a vivid and highly-arousal emotional learning, which are novelty, unpredictability, sense of low control, threat to ego, avoidance (aversion-mediated learning), and reward (reward-based learning).KeywordsNeuroeducationImplicit learningNeuroscienceEmotional-enhanced learningLearningLong-term memory
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There has been substantial research undertaken on the integration of computational thinking (CT) in K-12 mathematics education in recent years, particularly since 2018 when relevant systematic reviews were conducted on the topic. Many empirical studies in this area have yet to elaborate clearly and explicitly on how CT may support mathematics learning, or otherwise, in CT-based mathematics activities. Addressing this research gap, we conducted a systematic review on the integration of CT in K-12 mathematics education with a focus on CT-based mathematics instruction and students learning under such instruction. The Web of Science database was searched for in terms of studies published from 2006 to 2021, from which 24 articles were selected to provide illustrations of CT-based mathematics instruction and related student learning, and they were further analyzed according to education levels and contexts, programming tools, learning outcomes in CT and mathematics, and the mutual relationship between CT and mathematics learning. Among the results, this review found that geometrized programming and student-centered instructional approaches were facilitators of productive learning in CT and mathematics. Moreover, CT-based mathematics learning entails an interactive and cyclical process of reasoning mathematically and reasoning computationally, which can occur when: (1) applying mathematics to construct CT artefacts; (2) applying mathematics to anticipate and interpret CT outputs; and (3) generating new mathematical knowledge in parallel with the development of CT. The findings contribute to an in-depth understanding of what, and how, CT-based mathematics instruction impacts student learning in K-12 contexts.
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This case study explored the impacts of project-based language teaching (PBLT) on developing high school students’ key competences and the factors influencing the effect of PBLT on improving high school students’ key competences in English as a foreign language. Two English teachers and 75 tenth graders from one middle school in Qingdao, China, were chosen as research participants. An explanatory mixed methods research design was adopted, including self-developed tests, semi-structured interviews, and teacher reflections. The results revealed that PBLT has many positive impacts on developing high school students’ key competences in English as a foreign language, especially on six aspects, noticing and attentive (A-1) and extracting and summarizing (A-3) in the A level, describing and interpreting (B-1) and synthesizing and application (B-3) in the B level, and reasoning and arguing with evidence (C-1) and creating and imagining (C-2) in the C level. Meanwhile, five factors including teacher’s understanding of PBLT, teacher’s ability of designing and assessing the project, teacher’s roles, teacher’s instructions, and students’ interest and motivation were found to influence the effect of PBLT on improving high school students’ key competences in English as a foreign language. Moreover, the study provides important implications for language instructors on better understanding and effectively implementing PBLT in language teaching.
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The information era puts higher requirements on current students’ learning methods to develop 21st-century skills. Project-based learning (PBL) and gamified learning have been two effective learning approaches, leading to an innovative exploration of combining both to improve learning outcomes. This study presents a systematic review of the literature published on “gamified PBL” (GPBL) over the past six years, focusing on GPBL approaches, learning outcomes, technical tools and theories. The results show that the gamified approaches of project-based learning can be divided into four types: gamify structure and procedure of PBL, gamify content of PBL, integrate prefabricated educational/serious games in PBL, and make a game as the activity of PBL. Most of the studies affirmed the positive effects of GPBL in enhancing students’ learning outcomes, especially for learning experience and motivation. Adopted techniques and theories in the reviewed studies were also summarized. In conclusion, we acquired four findings based on the discussion: the characteristics of GPBL are diverse; design-based learning are an innovative and creative method used in GPBL; studies of GPBL emphasized collection and description of the whole-process data; technical issues should be paid great attention to. In addition, a number of suggestions for future research are provided in this review.
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Full Thesis hosted on: https://livrepository.liverpool.ac.uk/3158265/1/201317890_Jul2022.pdf Abstract: Virtual Learning Environments (VLEs), as the critical educational technology, have the potential to enable new learning opportunities (e.g., personalized adaptive learning and seamless mobile learning) and promote educational innovations for sustainable educational change in Higher Education (HE). While the research on VLEs and technology-enhanced learning in HE has been promising, the adoption of VLEs and the diffusion of educational innovations are not as widespread as expected, and the mechanism is unclear. Additionally, most the Higher Education Institutions (HEIs) have, until the recent COVID-19 disruption, been somewhat cautious about the potential educational reform. Whether the emergency educational transition is temporary or sustainable remains an open question. This research programme investigates how technology promotes educational change through six sub-studies of VLEs in HE. Five studies have been published as journal papers, while one is under review. Firstly, a systematic literature review was conducted to analyse the recent studies of VLE adoption from 2001 to 2020. Two-factor categories - institutional and individual were synthesized from 290 factors identified from findings of 145 studies across 42 countries and regions. Consequently, knowledge gaps of the institutional and individual factors and mechanisms were further investigated by conducting five studies from multiple perspectives. Specifically, four empirical studies examined three key aspects (institutional normative facilitating, institutional cognitive-cultural influence, and individual cognitions) of the VLE adoption and educational innovation institutionalisation in a Sino-British international university in China. The four studies employed various research methods (qualitative, quantitative, and mixed) to investigate technology promoted educational changes in different institutional stages at the individual and organisational levels. Finally, a conceptual study was conducted to reconceptualise the digital learning ecology model based on the existing literature and empirical findings at an institutional field level, a social arena in which individuals and organizations share a common meaning system (Scott, 2004). The main results revealed that VLEs could promote sustainable educational change through the technology-human interactions that are directed by the two-dimensional meaning-making process: collective cognitive consensus (i.e., national culture and learning community) and individual cognitive divergence (i.e., perceived pedagogical value, perceived self-efficacy, and perceptions of justice). This research programme contributes to the literature on Education, Information Technology, Psychology and Sociology by extending people’s understanding of the existing theories and models (e.g., Unified Theory of Acceptance and Use of Technology, Institutionalisation Model, Social Learning Theory, Organizational Justice Theory and Equity Theory, HeXie Education Model) through the theory development and reconceptualisation. This research programme provides theoretical and practical implications to address the grand challenges in HE (i.e., success in technology adoption, widespread innovations, and sustainable educational change). The research findings suggested that educational policy makers and practitioners should include teachers and students as the co-creators of the future digital learning ecosystem, provide continuous teacher professional development in technological and pedagogical skills and knowledge, and develop student competence in self-directed learning and digital resilience. Educators, learners, and researchers should utilise the findings and supporting methods to develop innovative learning and teaching approaches. Future research is needed to test the theoretical models in other educational contexts (e.g., K12 and vocational) and geographies with larger samples to enhance global development. 虚拟学习环境作为关键的教育技术,具有创造新的学习机会(如个性化自适应学习和无缝移动学习)的潜力,并促进可持续教育变革和创新。虽然在高等教育中对“虚拟学习环境”与“技术强化学习”的研究取得了可喜的进展,但“虚拟学习环境”的应用和教育创新的扩散并没有预期的那么广泛,其机制也尚不明确。此外,大多数高等教育机构在经历疫情之前,对潜在的教育改革持谨慎态度。疫情期间的紧急教育转变是暂时的还是可持续的仍然是一个悬而未决的问题。本研究计划通过对高等教育领域中虚拟学习环境展开的六项具体研究,调查技术是如何促进教育变革的。其中五项研究已经作为国际高质量期刊论文发表,剩余一项正在期刊评审过程中。首先,本研究系统地梳理了2001年至2020年国内外关于高等教育领域对虚拟学习环境的接受与应用的研究现状分析。该文献综述研究从42个国家和地区的145项研究中发现了290个因素并概括为制度和个人两大类。基于该文献研究,本论文从多视角开展了另外五项研究,进一步探讨了制度因素和个体因素的研究缺口及其尚未明确的机制。 具体而言,本论文通过四项实证研究考察了西交利物浦大学这所新型快速发展的国际化大学在应用虚拟学习环境促进教育创新制度化的三个关键方面的机制(制度规范、制度认知-文化影响和个体认知)。这四项实证研究采用了多种不同研究方法(定性、定量和混合) 来调查技术在个人和组织层面上如何促进不同制度阶段的教育变革。最后,本论文进行了一项概念性研究,以现有的文献和以上四项实证研究结果为基础,在制度场域层面重新概念化数字学习生态模型,强调个人和组织共享一个共同的意义生成系统。主要研究结果显示,虚拟学习环境可以通过技术与人的互动促进可持续的教育变革,而技术与人的互动是由两个维度的意义生成过程所引导的。它们分别是集体认知共识(即民族文化和学习共同体)和个体认知多元化(即感知教育价值、感知自我效能和感知公正) 。 本论文通过理论的发展和概念化,拓展了人们对现有理论和模型(如技术接受模型、制度化模型、社会学习理论、组织公正理论和公平理论、和谐教育模型等)的理解,对教育、信息技术、心理学和社会学等领域的研究做出了重大贡献。该博士研究项目提供了重要的理论和实践意义,从而有利于解决高等教育的重大挑战(即技术应用的成功,广泛的创新和可持续的教育变革)。研究结果表明,教育政策制定者和实践者应将教师和学生作为未来数字学习生态系统的共同创造者,在技术,教学技能和知识方面提供持续的教师专业发展,并培养学生自主学习能力和数字弹性。教育工作者、学习者和研究人员应充分利用这些研究发现来开发创新的学习和教学方法。未来的研究需要在其他教育背景下进一步深化(例如中小学和职业技术类教育领域),并且突破地理区域限制,通过更多样化的大量样本对所提出的理论模型进行更广泛地测试检验,以促进全球教育可持续发展
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Purpose This paper aims to identify computational thinking (CT) in 4th to 6th grade students in the context of project-based problem-solving while engaged in an after-school program. Design/methodology/approach This case study approach was selected due to its suitability for answering “how” or “why” questions about real-world phenomena within a set context (Creswell and Poth, 2018; Yin, 2018). This was an appropriate fit given the context of an after-school program and the research question asked how to identify learners’ demonstrated CT through project-based learning hands-on activities and problem-solving in a naturalistic environment. Findings Results show that heuristics, algorithms and conditional logic were observed more than other components of CT such as data collection, simulations and modeling. Descriptions of common activities in a naturalistic learning environment are presented to illustrate how the students practiced CT over time, which could help readers develop an understanding of CT in conjunction with hands-on problem-solving activities in elementary students. Identifying and classifying CT in this study focused on students’ learning process. Originality/value This study contributes to the challenging field of evaluating CT while focusing on observable behaviors and problem-solving activities with various degrees of teacher’s facilitation instead of final artifacts. Implications for researchers and educators interested in integrating CT in K-12 learning and its assessment are discussed.
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The goal of this paper is to bring new insights to the study of social learning processes by designing measures of collaboration using high-frequency sensor data. More specifically, we are interested in understanding the interplay between moments of collaboration and cooperation, which is an understudied area of research. We collected a multimodal dataset during a collaborative learning activity typical of makerspaces: learning how to program a robot. Pairs of participants were introduced to computational thinking concepts using a block-based environment. Mobile eye-trackers, physiological wristbands, and motion sensors captured their behavior and social interactions. In this paper, we analyze the eye-tracking data to capture participants’ tendency to synchronize their visual attention. This paper provides three contributions: (1) we use an emerging methodology (mobile dual eye-tracking) to capture joint visual attention in a co-located setting and replicate findings that show how levels of joint visual attention are positively correlated with collaboration quality; (2) we qualitatively analyzed the co-occurrence of verbal activity and joint visual attention in low and high performing groups to better understand moments of collaboration and cooperation; (3) inspired by the qualitative observations and theories of collaborative learning, we designed a new quantitative measure that captures cycles of collaborative and cooperative work. Compared to simple measures of joint visual attention, we found it to increase correlation coefficients with learning and collaboration scores. We discuss those results and describe how advances in analyzing sensor data can contribute to theories of collaboration. We conclude with implications for capturing students’ interactions in co-located spaces using Multimodal Learning Analytics (MMLA).
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This case study explored changes in seven in-service middle school science teachers’ understandings of project-based learning (PBL) environments after participating in a summer institute on PBL. Of particular interest was their participation in the institute as learners in a PBL unit exploring the effect of land use on water quality in the watershed. We investigated how well teachers were able to apply their understanding of PBL as they designed their own units on water quality in their watershed. Research questions focused the study on how participation in a summer teacher institute on PBL prepared middle school teachers to describe key features of project-based learning environments, and how well they were able to incorporate these features in PBL units. Data collection included a qualitative pre/post PBL survey, teachers’ watershed units, and field notes from the institute. Findings from the pre and post survey showed that teachers demonstrated a vague understanding of essential features of PBL environments pre institute and a detailed understanding of PBL post institute. Teachers’ units varied in the degrees to which PBL features were exhibited. Strengths of the units included driving questions and benchmark lessons. Shortcomings included few opportunities for student-directed investigation of sub-driving questions.
Chapter
Collaborative learning is a crucial topic in the debate about higher education, and more recently, this issue has been addressed focusing on the opportunities connected to hybrid and blended learning. Although this issue has been addressed from several points of view, there are still few scholars who have analyzed it by comparing collaborative learning experiences conducted in presence with parallel online experiences. The contribution here proposed, starting from an experience conducted within a teaching course belonging to the Combined Bachelor and Master’s Degree Course in Primary Education of the University of Verona (Italy); it analyzes a Project Based Learning experience that, following the new needs emerged during the pandemic, has been conducted in two parallel paths (one for in-presence students and one for online students). At the end of the course, a survey was proposed to the students with the aim to investigate the effectiveness of this “double experience” in order to optimize the path for the future.
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The study primarily aims to find out the benefits and challenges of project-based learning (PBL) on the learners’ general learning experiences, their development in English, and personal growth regarding human rights. This study has one-group post-test only design within the mixed methods research design model. The participants of this study were 30 EFL students and the collected quantitative data was analyzed using descriptive statistics in SPSS. The qualitative data gathered through reflection papers were analyzed through thematic analysis. The results revealed that project-based learning had positive impact on learners’ experiences in general and cooperative learning. It was also recorded that in addition to the acquisition of new knowledge and skills in promoting human rights, project-based learning also positively affected learners’ language improvement in English. The most challenging point indicated by the participants was related to finding credible sources and identifying reliable information.
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In this study the investigators used two different approaches to investigate preservice teachers’ Technological Pedagogical Content Knowledge (TPACK) competencies and self-regulated learning skills (SRL). The first study was conducted at Ahmet Keleşoğlu Education Faculty, Necmettin Erbakan University (NEU), Konya, Turkiye and the second study was conducted at Arkansas Tech University (ATU), Arkansas, the United States. The data from the participants at NEU was collected from 375 preservice teachers to examine the correlation among preservice teachers’ TPACK competencies, SRL and their gender and years of study. Although the findings revealed that preservice teachers’ TPACK competencies differed by their gender and year of study, there was no significant difference in their SRL skills. Finally, the results indicated that there were positive and significant relationships between the preservice teachers’ TPACK competencies and their self-regulated learning skills. The data from the ATU participants was collected from 66 preservice teachers (54 undergraduates, 12 graduate). The ATU study examined the impact of employing project-based learning (PBL) on students’ TPACK competencies, self-efficacy (SE), and SRL in different learning environments. The findings indicated that the use of PBL does enhance preservice teachers’ SRL skills in all learning environments. Finally, the findings indicated that students’ TPACK competencies significantly increased after using PBL.
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Este proyecto recoge el proceso de trabajo realizado por 107 alumnos en la asignatura de Historiade la Publicidad impartida en primer curso del grado en Publicidad de la Unversidad Francisco de Vitoria.Dicho proyecto ha permitido incorporar como metodología docente el Aprendizajo Basado en Proyectos y su aplicación a la producción de un podcast por parte de los alumnos.En este sentido, vemos que tanto el ABP, como el podcast se presentan como una alternativa a los métodos tradicionales de aprendizaje favoreciendo así la adquisición de competencias que le son solicitadas al alumno dentro del Espacio Europeo Educación Superior (EEES).
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Promoting an increase in motivation in first-year undergraduate students not only results in an improvement in their follow-up, performance, and therefore their satisfaction, but can also lead to a reduction in early dropout due to any situation of frustration or poor results. To confirm the initial assumption, the present research work demonstrates how the work of certain competencies in a transversal way allows the first-time student to increase empathy with the degree while improving interpersonal relationships with their peers being an aspect that significantly affects the intrinsic motivation of the student. The chapter focuses on analyzing the results of two transversal tasks carried out through a teamwork process and monitored during the first year of the Bachelor's Degree in Architecture. For the analysis, we used a mixed approach that allowed us to identify the strengths (enhanced in the new iterations) and weaknesses of the proposal on which we are already acting in subsequent replications of these types of transversal activities.KeywordsTransversal competenciesTeamworkPedagogical innovationEducational assessmentStudent motivation
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Rapid advances in science and engineering, and pervasive adoption of resulting technological products, are influencing every aspect of human living and fueling a growing demand for a workforce that is adequately prepared for the emerging occupations in STEM fields. Educating students for success in the modern technology-rich workplace requires teachers who have the knowledge, comfort, capability, and training to adopt and integrate new technologies for classroom teaching and learning. Thus, to prepare high school teachers for incorporating robotics in their students’ education and promoting their understanding of engineering concepts and technology applications, a four-week long robotics workshop was designed and conducted annually for three summers. Examination of changes in the workshop participants’ levels of robotics self-efficacy, familiarity, and content knowledge, as well as analysis of outcomes of robotics capstone projects and end-of-year contests, is suggestive of study findings being promising for education researchers and professional development providers interested in leveraging the potential of robotics in STEM education.
Conference Paper
This work in progress paper presents an approach to combine inductive and deductive learning methods with hands-on experiences to increase the interest of K-12 pupils in Science, Technology, Engineering and Mathematics (STEM). Didactive methods are shown and a suitable approach is highlighted. Possible electrochemical experiments in the context of electrified aviation are discussed and theoretical basics for the selected hands-on activities are explained. Furthermore, a way of quantifying the results is described and further ideas for the future expansion of the laboratory are presented. The developed experiments may be used for training purposes internally in the institute, for public relations activities during public events as well as a building block in the architecture of the DLR_School_Lab network. In conclusion, the presented approach could not only help fascinate more pupils for STEM studies and careers, but also enables disruptive technologies like electrified aviation to gain more acceptance in society.
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The effectiveness of design thinking (DT) education is increasingly demonstrated; it allows teachers to face complex challenges in their day-to-day work. However, few teachers have training in this discipline. This study presents the ‘Think-Create-Teach’ (TCT) methodology to help preservice teachers to create instructional materials guided by DT. The TCT methodology is applied and assessed through quantitative methods in a project-based learning subject with 56 preservice teachers (experimental group). Subsequently, the work processes and instructional materials developed by the experimental group were compared to a control group of 52 preservice teachers who did not use TCT. The quantitative results were supported with qualitative methods to understand the reasoning behind. This paper demonstrates the TCT contribution to designing better instructional materials, its integration into the teaching curriculum, its validity as design training, and its ability to help teachers answer today's changing education. This paper shows that design discipline and the methodology proposed have a relevant role in the training of preservice teachers.
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