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... Although the modern pharmacological studies has demonstrated that antihypertensive (5), antifertility (6), antihyperglycemic (7-11), antihyperlipidemic (12, 13), antiproliferative (14), antioxidant (15, 16), anticonvulsant (17), antinociceptive (18,19) and anxiolytic (20) effects of this medicinal plant decrease the toxic heavy metal accumulation in fish (22), there is no pharmacological report about the role of opiate system in antinociceptive of CS properties. ...
... This plant in Iranian traditional medicine is believed to have carminative, diuretic, and affect in dyspeptic complaints, loss of appetite, convulsion, insomnia and anxiety and in medical purposes, the fruits of coriander have been used in different forms (powdered seeds or dry extract) (3, 4). It has been reported that CS has antihypertensive (5), antifertility (6), antihyperglycemic (7-11), antihyperlipidemic (12, 13), antiproliferative (14), antioxidant (15, 16), anticonvulsant (17), antinociceptive (18, 19), and anxiolytic effects (20, 21) which decrease the toxic heavy metal accumulation in fish (22). ...
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Our previous study showed that Coriandrum sativum (CS) has antinociceptive effects, but the mechanisms that mediate this effect are not clear. The present study was designed to test the role of opiate system in the antinociceptive effects of CS on acute and chronic pain in mice using Hot Plate (HP), Tail Flick (TF) and Formalin (FT) tests and also to compare its effect with dexamethasone (DEX) and stress (ST). Young adult male albino mice (25-30 g) in 33 groups (n = 8 in each group) were used in this study. CS (125 250, 500 and 1000 mg/Kg IP), DEX (0.5, 1 and 2 mg/Kg IP), vehicle (VEH) or swim stress were used 30 min before the pain evaluation tests. Acute and chronic pain was assessed by HP, TF and FT models. In addition, Naloxone (NAL, 2 mg/Kg, IP) was injected 15 min before the CS extract administration in order to assess the role of opiate system in the antinociception of CS. Results indicated that CS, DEX and ST have analgesic effects (p < 0.01) in comparison with the control group and higher dose of CS was more effective (p < 0.001). Besides, pretreatment of NAL modulates the antinociceptive effects of CS in all models (p < 0.001). The above findings showed that CS, DEX and ST have modulator effects on pain. These findings further indicate that the CS extract has more analgesic effects than DEX and ST and also provides the evidence for the existence of an interaction between antinociceptive effects of CS and opiate system.
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Numerous side effects of synthetic drugs have caused medicinal plants to be regarded in recent decades as a reliable source of new drugs. Regarding the analgesic effects of many plants that are pointed in traditional medicine of Iran, many studies have been performed in this field that have caused need to be reviewed. In this study, different methods of testing pain, analgesic activity and possible compounds of medicinal plants and also the possible mechanisms actions of these plants are presented. The data presented in this review paper provide scientific information that might be used for isolation of potentially active compounds from some of these medicinal plants in future.
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