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Abstract

Instructional rubrics help teachers teach as well as evaluate student work. Further, creating rubrics with your students can be powerfully instructive.
... It has been shown that rubrics shared via technology increase consistency and fairness by avoiding ambiguity among students (Panulla & Kohler, 2010), and enhance high-order thinking, reasoning skills, collaboration and development of interpersonal skills. Rubrics help to clarify the expectations of the instructor and are crucial in promoting reflective thinking among students and teachers (Andrade, 2000). They enable educators to create a set of standards for the completion of indicated tasks and allow learners to understand skills and behaviours expected from the mastery of each assigned learning activity (Arter, 2012;Wolf & Stevens, 2007). ...
... These results are also in agreement with the reported study on the role of rubrics in testing and teaching (Popham, 2006) which mentioned that rubrics are used to grade the quality of learners' works, make scoring more systematic and enhance students' knowledge retention. Rubrics inspire learners to reflect on their learning advancement and facilitate teachers to modify the teaching approaches for addressing learning gaps where applicable (Andrade, 2000;Muhammad et al., 2018). The findings in this study are also in the same view with the findings of the study conducted by Andrade and Du (2005), who questioned 14 students after utilization of rubrics in class for solving tasks. ...
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A signifcant number of instructors, researchers and students have claimed that chemistry is a challenging subject to teach and learn at all education levels. Its main learning difculties are in line with certain sights of its phenomena that are abstract, and some chemistry teachers do not specify what to be learned and assessed in chemistry lesson. The current work investigates the use of formative assessment rubrics for supporting secondary school students’ progressive learning in organic chemistry through a technology-based learning project approach in Rwanda. The investigators used a convergent parallel research design, and quantitative data were gathered by distributing questionnaires to the students, and the answers were statistically analyzed. Qualitative data were obtained through observation and interview and were narratively analyzed. The results from this study showed that rubric-based formative assessment supported students’ learning of organic chemistry via technology-based learning approach. This is accredited to the fact that students were motivated while doing their assessment and they were able to do self-assessment by applying the provided rubrics via technology. The students understood instructors’ expectations, encouraged their learning, sharpened their technology skills, and their knowledge retention was also increased. The instructors were able to grade the students’ tasks fast with the help of an analytic rubric and good formative feedback was availed to students on time. The instructors were also able to diagnose the strengths and weaknesses of the learners and give them quick formative feedback.
... Some basic form of rubrics is meant to identify gradation quality for each criteria in the work submitted (Andrade, 2000). Rubrics are meant to be used for assessment first. ...
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Aim/Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to develop instructional rubrics that help in writing and evaluating doctoral dissertation research problem statements. Background: This is a follow up study. In the first paper (Ali & Pandya, 2021), we introduced a model for writing a research problems statement that takes the students through four phases to complete their writing. In this paper, we introduce an instructional rubric to be used for helping to writing the re-search problem statement. Methodology: This paper builds on the previous model, adding to it Socratic questions to trigger critical thinking to help with writing of research problem statement. Contribution: Developing the instructional rubrics is the contribution of this study. The instructional rubrics can help with the writing of a research problem statement. Findings: Writing a research problem statement is difficult by itself. Following the methodological approach suggested in this study will help students with the task of writing their own. Following this instructional rubric will help more with the writing. Recommendations for Practitioners: A methodological approach to writing a research problem statement is helpful in mitigating the difficulties of writing the dissertation. This study tackles the difficulties with writing the research problem statement. Recommendations for Researchers: More research is needed to give examples of research problem statement that shows the writing of the statement through the suggested phases. Impact on Society: The findings of this research will help doctoral mentors/advisors as they guide students in completing the writing of their research problem statement.
... to make justifiable evaluations (Popham, 1997;Andrade, 2000;Panadero and Jonsson, 2013) and help students understand the desired performance and make an improvement (Andrade and Du, 2005;Panadero and Jonsson, 2013;Wu et al., 2021) and thus bear evaluative and instructional value (Popham, 1997;Andrade, 2005) and contribute in the paradigm of assessment for learning (Black and Wiliam, 2009;Zhou and Deneen, 2016). ...
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The effectiveness of a rubric depends on how it is enacted. Although students' efforts in rubric use vary, few studies have investigated the hidden motivations when rubrics are utilized for classroom assessment. This qualitative study attempts to categorize students' effort in rubric use and identify personal differences and contextual factors influencing the effort in the EFL classroom assessment environment. A total of 79 students at a Chinese university participated in the study. The data collected included their classroom oral presentation results and nine case study informants' retrospective interviews on their processes of rubric use. Focuses were drawn upon students' perceptions and practices of rubric use throughout the task process. Totally, three types of effort patterns emerged in light of students' self-ratings and descriptions of the use. The intense kind held firm trust in rubric utility and thus utilized the rubric to develop the targeted competence throughout the whole process. The medium type either selectively followed the rubric in optional phases of the process due to their judgments of the rubric and the task. The loose type was least responsive to the rubric since their actions seemed largely affected by their self-efficacy and prior experience. Results showed that students' effort in rubric use in classroom assessment was the outcome of cognitive appraisals of a rubric, students themselves, and a task. The study highlights trait motivation and task motivation in the effectiveness of rubric use in assessment practices. Implications on rubric employment and task design are drawn to tap students' motivation for rubric use to achieve assessment for learning.
... After noting your students' pronunciation levels, move to vocabulary. Vocabulary comprehension and vocabulary production are always two separate banks of words in the mind of a speaker (Andrade, 2000). A student may struggle with grammar and pronunciation, but how creative is she while communicating in the language s/he knows? ...
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Joyce termed the collection of short stories “Dubliners” as a “chapter of Dublin’s moral history”. The collection is subdivided into four main branches: childhood, youth, adulthood and social cycles. The third cycle is a matter of our focal interest. It consists of four stories: “A Little Cloud”, “Counterparts”, “Clay” and “A Painful Case”. Despite the age, gender, and social differences, all protagonists have the unifying traits - their inability to change their life or environment, fear of freedom. They are captivated by a deadly routine that drains life out of them and leads to ‘paralysis’, which is the natural state of Dublin. This cycle is the most tragic part of the “Dubliners”, as after the first feeble and futile attempt of releasing themselves from the deadly influence of Dublin, the young protagonists of the previous cycle join the humble and mute majority and turn into the grim protagonists of the adult cycle, who have to face the outcomes of their cowardice and indecisiveness in the period of youth and resort to violence and alcohol as the means of escape from reality. The ‘paralysis’ of the key characters in the collection of short stories is emphasized by means of numerous artistic devices. Joyce refers to such symbols as colours associated with death and decay: yellow, grey, brown - the weather, which is usually drab, gloomy and rainy, constant darkness and the lack of bright colours; the symbol of the circle - despite its positive connotation in general, as a form of harmony, in this collection the circle denotes enslavement, deadlock, constant repetition of the monotonous routine which lives no way out. Key words: Dublin, paralysis, indecisive, freedom, violence, routine
... 6.2 Valora si el modelo obtenido proporciona una solución parcial o total a la situación problemática inicial. Por un lado, como puede apreciarse en la Figura 3, esta rúbrica se inspira en las fases del ciclo de modelización de Blum y Leiβ (2007); y, por otro lado, tiene en cuenta los planteamientos de Andrade (2000) acerca de las rúbricas instruccionales, por lo que sirve tanto para describir cómo se desarrolla la modelización matemática como para analizar y evaluar los procesos de modelización matemática. ...
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La modelización matemática temprana, entendida como un proceso que ayuda a crear los primeros modelos para analizar, explicar y comprender la realidad, es un marco idóneo para implementar un enfoque competencial de las matemáticas. Desde este punto de vista, se presenta la actividad “construimos casas con piezas de madera”, que se ha implementado a 20 niños de 3 años. Para analizar el ciclo de modelización, se han utilizado los indicadores de Educación Infantil del instrumento “Rubric for the Evaluation of Mathematical Modeling Processes”. Los resultados indican que los niños de 3 años empiezan a desarrollar habilidades de comprensión, estructuración, matematización, trabajo matemático, interpretación, validación y exposición, por lo que son capaces de crear los primeros modelos concretos. Se concluye que, en futuros estudios, es necesario determinar la influencia de diversas variables en las acciones de los niños, como el tipo de tarea o los conocimientos del profesorado de Educación Infantil para llevar a cabo actividades de modelización matemática temprana.
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This study explored the learning effectiveness of drawing makeup designs by computer graphic design and compared the learning differences between traditional hand-drawn and computer-assisted teaching in cosmetology students at universities. The statistical analysis methods of factor analysis, descriptive statistical analysis, and paired sample t-test are used to analyze the difference in students’ learning attitudes before and after the course. It also explored students’ learning effectiveness. The subjects were 55 students from a cosmetology department of a university in Taiwan. The results showed that using a computer tool to create makeup designs improved the overall student learning effectiveness and effectively promoted students’ interest in learning. Moreover, through focus group interviews, changes in the learning effectiveness that were brought about by the use of computer graphic design tools were obtained. Among them, the mirror function could best meet the needs of students for makeup symmetry and design drawing speed and improve their satisfaction with computer graphic makeup. The results of this study are improving the learning effectiveness, maintaining a positive attitude and increasing willingness to learn, and the systematization and digitization of makeup design, and the results could promote teachers to obtain more efficient teaching quality, improve students’ professional skills, and result in better learning results.
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This study aimed to investigate the use of formative assessment rubrics for supporting the learning of organic chemistry in secondary schools in Rwanda. A mixed research approach was used to collect and analyze data. The target population was 210 senior five chemistry students and 15 chemistry teachers. However, 140 senior five chemistry students and 10 senior five chemistry teachers were purposively selected to participate in the study. The qualitative data were obtained from the interview while quantitative data were obtained from the survey questionnaire. The qualitative data were analyzed by discourse and interpretive approaches while quantitative data were checked by descriptive statistics. 125 The results of this study showed that from rubric formative assessment, students understood instructors' expectations and encouraged individual learning. The students' knowledge retention was also increased. The instructors mentioned that they were able to grade the students' tasks fast with the help of an analytic rubric and good formative feedback was availed to students on time. The students were satisfied with the use of the formative assessment rubric and they affirmed that they were motivated and engaged in learning organic chemistry. It was recommended that chemistry teachers should use rubrics during formative assessment in organic chemistry.
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Se describen y ejemplifican diversas orientaciones didácticas para introducir la modelización matemática temprana en Educación Infantil y, así, promover una enseñanza basada en pensar y hacer, más que memorizar definiciones y procedimientos. Con esta finalidad, el artículo se estructura en tres partes: en la primera parte, se describen diversas ideas clave para el profesorado de infantil en torno a la modelización matemática; en la segunda parte, se describen orientaciones para el diseño, implementación y evaluación de actividades de modelización matemática temprana en infantil; y, finalmente, en la tercera parte se muestra un ejemplo de actividad de modelización matemática temprana implementada con un grupo de 21 niños de 5 años. Se concluye que la realización de actividades de modelización a lo largo de la escolaridad puede contribuir a que el alumnado dé sentido a las matemáticas, además de tomar conciencia de su diversidad de aplicaciones en el mundo real.
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The distinctive strategy for learning continuity in the High School Department of San Pablo Colleges (SPC) during this pandemic is the Hybrid Education Learning Program (HELP). The descriptive study determined the self-efficacy for hybrid learning among selected Junior and Senior High School learners in SPC (n=917). The study also probed into learners’ perceptions of hybrid learning in relation to the interdependence of modular and online learning. The results showed that students were generally positive about hybrid learning, and they also acknowledge the interdependencies between modular and online learning. The majority of the students (82%) regard themselves with high self-efficacy for online learning. Students are one in saying (99.67%) that they can submit online assignments well. Moreover, the majority of the students (78%) regard themselves with high self-efficacy for modular learning, but unlike in submitting online assignments (99.67%), students claim that a relatively lower percentage (65.31%) can submit offline assignments easily. The indicators with the least percentages of agreeing with the online and modular learning statements say that they can use the library’s online resources and focus on schoolwork when faced with distractions. It is also evident that students still wish to be in the same room with their teacher and classmates based on the relatively low percentages of agreeing to the statements.
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Work in Hungary took place during the entire duration of the development project. Pedagogical work was conducted over two school years between February 2016 and June 2017. The team undertook two rounds of data collection. Apart from three private schools, schools involved in the project were public. In Hungary, the local co-ordinators focused on a school population of disadvantaged students, many of them young Romani. The team already carried out work with a network of schools and teachers and added the project materials and ideas to its previous practice. It worked in both primary and secondary education and focused on mathematics and science education. In this study, Hungary reported one of the lowest shares of students with an immigrant background (2%), and a high proportion of classes with a positive class climate (60%). The time span between pre- and post-measurements in Hungary was relatively short (17 weeks), and relatively light for students (8 hours of intervention in class), although they continued working with the new pedagogical activities during the whole school year, 90 minutes a week. The difference between rounds was remarkable: the second year of the project, the intervention with students lasted considerably longer (51 hours of intervention in class), and 34 weeks passed between pre- and post-measurements. Teacher professional development in the Hungarian Team comprised one intensive induction training followed up by regular meeting sessions throughout the intervention. Professional development workshops, monitoring sessions and continuous mentoring was provided. During the first round, the team used the Creative Partnerships method (see Chapter 3 for more information on the signature pedagogies). During the second round, two kinds of pedagogies were used in the “intervention” schools: Creative Partnerships and the Step by Step approach. The Creative Partnerships approach involves continuous teacher professional development based on collaboration with an artist or a creative professional with the class teacher. The artist helps the teachers change their teaching in different subjects to make it more creative and engaging for students. The Step by Step approach focuses on structured co operation and teamwork. All intervention teachers had sessions about the OECD rubrics and the Hungarian project team closely supported teachers participating in the Creative Partnerships programme. Chapter 3. Eleven signature pedagogies related to the fostering of creativity and critical thinking - Creative Partnerships (all subjects) page 77- 79 Chapter 8 - Hungarian Team page 217- 221 At T-Tudok Centre for Knowledge Management and Educational Research and Education Authority, Budapest: Szilvia Németh (project coordinator) and Anita Kaderják; At T-Tudok Centre for Knowledge Management and Educational Research:, Judit Kádár Fülöp, Judit Lannert, Daniel Vince, Dezső Máté; At the University of Pécs: Attila Lengvárszky, Péter Lengyel, and Endre Raffay; at the Step by Step Programme Hungary, Bertalanné Zágon and Éva Deák; At the Educational Authority, Budapest: Sándor Brassói, László Ostorics and László Pongrácz
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