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Beyond potsherds: A technofunctional analysis of San Pedro pottery from the

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Beyond potsherds: A technofunctional analysis of San Pedro pottery from the

... In the past such attempts were hindered-or if undertaken, were led astray-by a lack of consensus as to what native pottery types marked the Contact-early Mission period Mocama. A litany of suspected candidates included St. Johns, Wilmington, Savannah, St. Marys, an unnamed sherd-tempered ware, as well as various combinations thereof (e.g., Ashley andRolland 1997, 2002;Deagan 1978;Goggin 1952;Larson 1958;Milanich 1971;Walker 1985a). Recent research now clearly points to the grog (or sherd) tempered San Pedro series as the sixteenth-century ceramic correlate of the Mocama. ...
... Ceramic studies suggest that most vessels in Mocama assemblages are grog tempered, although the range includes some sand tempered wares (Ashley 2001(Ashley , 2009Ashley and Rolland 1997). The San Pedro pottery series 6 , dated to ca. ...
... 158;Kramberger 2015). Biochemical studies may give us direct links between the vessels and the contents they originally held and thus can help not only to explain the actual function of individual ceramic finds, but also various other questions concerning pottery use. 1 1 In parallel, the analysis of morphological characteristics of vessels, analysis of pottery manufacturing technology (techno-functional analysis), analysis of use-al-terations, studies of archaeological contexts (e.g., Ashley 2001;Wilson, Rodning 2002;Braun 2010;Boudreaux III 2010), as well as ethnographic analogy (e.g., Costin 2000;Hegmon 2000;Eerkens 2005. 86), although it may be unrecognised initially, can give us further indications about the intended use of prehistoric ceramics (see also Henrickson, McDonald 1983;Schiffer, Skibo 1987;Rice 1987.207-232;Eerkens ...
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This paper discusses the use of ceramic objects in daily life in the Early Eneolithic period, based on ceramic assemblages from the settlement at Zgornje Radvanje in Maribor. The possible function of individual pottery types was studied through typological analysis, pottery production methods, traces of secondary burning and carbonized residues, and ethnographic parallels. The function of different types of settlement structure is discussed on the basis of statistical comparisons of the composition of ceramic assemblages.
... On the basis of sand frequency, San Pedro and San Marcos groups were subdivided into fine and sandy categories. For the San Pedro samples, the relative proportion of sandy examples may be higher than is typical of the type (see Ashley and Rolland, 1997;Ashley, 2001). Sponge spicule and sand frequency were used to subdivide St. Johns samples into very fine, fine and sandy categories. ...
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A case study is presented to test the notion that minority pottery types from 16th century contexts at the Fountain of Youth (FOY) site in St. Augustine reflect population movements from the north that preceded major political reorganizations in the region. Petrographic methods are employed to trace the manufacturing origins of early historic period aboriginal pottery in northeast Florida. Fragments of siliceous microfossils, including sponge spicules, opal phytoliths, and, most notably, diatoms, were identified in the matrix of some early historic period aboriginal pottery from FOY, as well as in some clay samples from the coastal region of northeast Florida and southeast Georgia. Diatom taxa are identified and their spatial distribution is assessed. The distribution of microfossils supports the nonlocal manufacturing origins of some samples from St. Augustine and conform to expectations about the historic movement of certain aboriginal groups to the settlement.
... On the basis of sand frequency, San Pedro and San Marcos groups were subdivided into fine and sandy categories. For the San Pedro samples, the relative proportion of sandy examples may be higher than is typical of the type (see Ashley and Rolland, 1997;Ashley, 2001). Sponge spicule and sand frequency were used to subdivide St. Johns samples into very fine, fine and sandy categories. ...
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Archaeologists have long known that important changes took place in aboriginal ceramic assemblages of the northern Florida, Georgia, and South Carolina coast after the arrival of Europeans. New pottery designs emerged and aboriginal demographics became fluid. Catastrophic population loss occurred in some places, new groups formed in others, and movements of people occurred nearly everywhere. Although culturally and linguistically diverse, the native inhabitants of this region shared the unwelcome encounter with Spanish people and colonial institutions, beginning in the early decades of the 16th century and continuing into the 18th century. Spanish missions and military outposts were established at native communities throughout the area, and these sites have been studied by both archaeologists and historians for decades. As a consequence, the lower southeastern Atlantic coast offers one of the most intensively studied episodes of multicultural colonial engagement in America. The Second Caldwell Conference was organized to bring researchers working in South Carolina, Georgia, and Florida together to address and more precisely define aboriginal ceramic change throughout the region as a baseline for approaching a more broadly based anthropological perspective on the consequences of encounter. The scope of inquiry was restricted to late prehistoric and early historic (A.D. 1400-1700) aboriginal ceramic wares from Santa Elena (South Carolina) to St. Augustine (Florida). The primary objective was to more precisely establish the technology, form, and design of the archaeological ceramic evidence. Without devolving into semantic and/or taxonomic wrangles, we examined how well (or poorly) archaeological labels used throughout the region to identify pottery serve as reliable proxies for the physical examples of those ceramic traditions. We also attempted to define the time-space distribution of the various ceramic traditions and pottery types throughout the south Atlantic coast. Specifically, we asked: (1) Did the indigenous ceramic complexes change fundamentally with the arrival of the Spaniards? (2) Or did indigenous ceramic traditions essentially persist, and merely shifted geographically? The eight contributions of this volume examine, on a case-by-case basis, the most important aboriginal ceramic assemblages from Santa Elena southward to St. Augustine, across the region, contextualizing each assemblage with the relevant physical stratigraphy, radiocarbon dates, associations with Euro-American wares, and documentary evidence. We also attempt to situate the physical ceramic evidence from the northern Florida-Georgia-South Carolina coastline with the contemporary archaeological assemblages in the immediate interior. The volume concludes with an epilogue that summarizes the results and general contributions of the conference, relative to archaeological practice in the lower Atlantic coastal Southeast, and also to the larger cultural and methodological issues raised by these papers.
Although this volume covers a broad range of temporal and methodological topics, the chapters are unified by a geographic focus on the archaeology of the Georgia Bight. The various research projects span multiple time periods (including Archaic, Woodland, Mississippian, and contact periods) and many incorporate specialized analyses (such as petrographic point counting, shallow geophysics, and so forth). The 26 contributors conducting this cutting-edge work represent the full spectrum of the archaeological community, including museum, academic, student, and contract archaeologists. Despite the diversity in professional and theoretical backgrounds, temporal periods examined, and methodological approaches pursued, the volume is unified by four distinct, yet interrelated, themes. Contributions in Part I discuss a range of analytical approaches for understanding time, exchange, and site layout. Chapters in Part II model coastal landscapes from both environmental and social perspectives. The third section addresses site-specific studies of late prehistoric architecture and village layout throughout the Georgia Bight. Part IV presents new and ongoing research into the Spanish mission period of this area. These papers were initially presented and discussed at the Sixth Caldwell Conference, cosponsored by the American Museum of Natural History and the St. Catherines Island Foundation, held on St. Catherines Island, Georgia, May 20-22, 2011.
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