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How Twitter Users Can Generate Better Ideas

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... Garrido-Moreno et al. (2015, p. 406) propose the need to "better conceptualize and measure social media use, developing more sophisticated measures that include frequency of use, relevance of the different tools implemented, and strategic integration." Similarly, since using more diverse contacts improves the quality of knowledge acquired and ideas generated (Parise et al., 2015), Sigala and Chalkiti (2015) propose analyzing the impact of the density, centricity and variability of social media used by a firm's employees. ...
... Our findings thus show the potential of SMTs use for firms since SMTs provide access to more diverse contacts, improving the quality of ideas that users generate (Parise et al., 2015) and facilitating improvement not only in OL but also in TKCs acquisition processes. ...
... Further, the model analyzes the relationship between SMTs and OP through SMTs and improvement in TKCs in technology firms. Other sectors might be analyzed, and other variables studied (Parise et al., 2015;Sigala and Chalkiti, 2015). ...
Article
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Purpose The purpose of this study is to deepen understanding of the effects of using social media technologies to acquire technological knowledge and organizational learning competences, of technological knowledge competences on organizational learning and finally of organizational learning on organizational performance. Design/methodology/approach The study was performed by analyzing data from a sample of 197 technology firms located in Spain. The hypotheses were tested using a structural equations model with the program LISREL 8.80. Findings This study’s conceptual framework is grounded in complexity theory – along with dynamic capabilities theory, which complements the resource-based view. The study contributes to the literature by proposing a model that reflects empirically how business ecosystems that use social media technologies enable the development of interorganizational and social collaboration networks that encourage learning and development of technological knowledge competences. Research limitations/implications It would be interesting for future studies to consider other elements to conceptualize and measure social media technologies, including (among others) significance of the various tools used and strategic integration. The model might also analyze other sectors and another combination of variables. Practical implications The results of this study have several managerial implications: developing social media technologies and interorganizational social collaboration networks not only enables the organizational learning process but also encourages technological knowledge competences. Through innovation processes, use of social media technologies also contributes to strengthening companies’ strategic positioning, which ultimately helps to improve firms’ organizational performance. Social implications Since social media technologies drive information systems in contemporary society (because they enable interaction with numerous agents), the authors highlight the use of complexity theory to develop a conceptual framework. Originality/value The study also deepens understanding of the connections by which new experiential learning contributes to the generation of coevolutionary adaptive business ecosystems and digital strategies that enable development of interorganizational and social collaborative networks through technological knowledge competences. Only after examining the impact of social media technologies on organizational performance in prior literature, did the authors underscore that both quantity and frequency of social media technology use are positively related to improvement in knowledge processes that lead to employees’ creation and acquisition of new metaknowledge.
... Furthermore, in attempting to do more work with IT, users encounter increasing amounts of information online. This increase in information can be attributed to the nature of their work, that is, conveying and converging information from multiple work-related sources (i.e., email, intranet, and profession-related news sites) to accomplish their work tasks (Parise, Whelan, & Todd, 2015). The collective expectations of availability via IT make these sources an integral part of such information-sharing activities (Mazmanian et al., 2013). ...
... In addition, the increased information flow can be attributed to the dispersed nature of information. IT users need to be creative when they retrieve information, and, in many cases, relevant sources of information lie beyond the organization's intranet and firewall (Parise et al., 2015;Pitichat, 2013). IT users must also be able to make sense of and absorb the information they come across on various profession-related sites, news pages, or even social networking sites (Addas & Pinsonneault, 2015;Jones et al., 2004). ...
... Users who perceive a strong need to increasingly use IT often actively seek and exchange work-related information online (Mazmanian et al., 2013). They know that the active use of IT is a way to get more work done and that exposing themselves to new profession-and taskrelated information is a way to steer their work forward (Parise et al., 2015;Porter & Kakabadse, 2006). Thus, individuals need to increase their IT use to reach that goal. ...
Article
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Information technology (IT) engagement is defined as a need to spend more time using IT. Practice-based examples show that IT engagement can have adverse effects in organizations. Although users can potentially get more work done through IT engagement, observations show that the users might jeopardize their well-being and hamper their work performance. We aimed to investigate this complexity in the research on IT engagement by examining its potential antecedents and outcomes in organizations. Considering the potentially mixed outcomes, we developed a model to examine the effects of IT engagement on personal productivity and strain. We also aimed to explain the antecedents of IT engagement by drawing on the collective expectations for IT use. In particular, we examined the extent to which normative pressure on IT use drives users' information load and IT engagement. Finally, we sought to understand whether users' attempts to avert dependency on IT use reduced their IT engagement. Several hypotheses were developed and tested with survey data of 1091 organizational IT users. The findings help explain the role of normative pressure as a key driver of IT engagement and validate the positive and negative outcomes of IT engagement in organizations.
... For individual creativity, social media might help employees generate creative ideas (Parise, 2015). ...
... Additionally, social media helps users communicate efficiently with colleagues, maintain interpersonal relationships, and expand social networks (Tajudeen et al., 2018). These advantages can help employees unleash creativity (Hu et al., 2017;Parise, 2015), yet be stumbling blocks (Kühnel et al., 2020). Studies have yielded paradoxical results on the relationship between social media and creativity (Chen et al., 2020). ...
... Negative consequences include greater conflicts, reduced productivity, or lower work performance (Davison et al., 2014;Moqbel & Kock, 2018). Some research has demonstrated that social media helps employees generate better ideas that promote creativity (Hu et al., 2017;Parise, 2015). Other work concluded that social media detriments creativity (Kühnel et al., 2020). ...
Article
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Developer creativity is vital for software companies to innovate and survive. Studies on social media have yielded mixed results about its impact on creativity due to the ubiquitous nature of social media. This research differentiates the effects of informational and socializing social media usage on both incremental and radical creativity and explore the moderating role of a developer's openness to experience. Based on a survey of software developers, the authors show that openness positively moderates the impact of informational social media usage on incremental and radical creativity and negatively moderates the impact of socializing social media usage on both types of creativity. There is a stronger positive moderation for the relationship between informational social media usage and radical creativity compared to incremental creativity. The results provide a foundation for understanding explanations of the paradoxical effect of social media usage on creativity.
... Combined wisely, they can lay the foundation for innovative methods and approaches for the newly arising complexities of our time (Baer, 2010;Burt, 2004;Eagle, Macy & Claxton, 2010;Parise, Whelan & Todd, 2015;Perry-Smith, 2006;Sosa, 2011). ...
... Will diverse networking affect people's willingness to support their networks by sharing information, influence, and solidarity? Since diverse professional networking has been shown to have many benefits (Baer, 2010;Burt, 2004;Eagle, Macy & Claxton, 2010;Parise, Whelan & Todd, 2015;Perry-Smith 2006;Sosa, 2011), are there also potential negative side effects? To investigate this question, I will look at people's social identification with their networks as a groundwork for the social capital theory and the willingness so support other people in the network by sharing information, influence, and solidity. ...
... In addition, network diversity is key. When it comes to product innovation and creativity, a diverse network that provides access to a rich set of information and new perspectives is most beneficial (Baer, 2010;Burt, 2004;Kochan et al., 2003;Parise, Whelan & Todd, 2015). ...
Thesis
Professional social networking sites (SNS) have become a vital part of modern days professional lives. They are a convenient way to receive information about job offers, work-related content, and to connect with other professionals independent of time and space. Research in the field of social capital has shown that a network of people can give access to information, influence, and solidarity which positively affect both subjective and objective career outcomes. Moreover, research has shown that a diverse network is most beneficial as it gives access to non-redundant information, new perspectives, and new ideas. Yet, most professional SNS users are mainly connected with others from their direct work environments such as colleagues and university friends. For one thing, this is because of the homophily principle which states that people tend to surround themselves with others who are similar to them. On the other hand, contact recommender systems of professional SNS support connecting with similar others as contact recommendations are usually based on similarity. The cumulative dissertation, therefore, was set out to investigate the technological and the human side of professional online networking to gain evidence on how to encourage professional SNS users to build more diverse business networks. The dissertation consists of four research articles answering the following four research questions: 1. Is there a difference between offline and online professional networking in terms of intensity and in terms of influence factors? 2. How do basic technological features and functions (e.g. diverse contact recommendations) influence professional online networking? 3. How do different information designs of contact recommendations influence professional online networking? 4. How does diverse online networking influence people’s social identification with their online business networks? In summary, the four research articles show that people’s online networking is mainly driven by cognitive factors, more specifically, people’s knowledge about the benefits of (diverse) networking. When people know about the benefits of networking and the benefits of diverse networking, they network more and more diverse. This can be addressed in the design of contact recommendations by displaying an explanation why someone is recommended thereby hinting at the benefits of networking in general and at the benefits of diversity. Moreover, this can be addressed by presenting contact recommendations emphasizing dissimilarity information in contrast to similarity information. Both different types of explanations and different types of information weaken the homophily principle and encourage people to network more diverse. Besides, basic technological functions influence online networking. When people are presented with a more diverse set of contact recommendations to choose from, they do not network less but consequently, end up with a more diverse business network. Furthermore, the negative affective influence of anxiety towards unknown people is different for offline than for online networking. In line with the social compensation hypothesis, in online settings, the negative influence is weaker than it is in offline settings. When only looking at online settings we see that higher levels of anxiety still reduce the number of people connected with but not the diversity of the resulting networks. Hence, people do not feel less anxiety when connecting with similar others than when connecting with dissimilar others. Finally, returning to the side of the user we see that more diverse online networking leads to a reduction of social identification with people’s online business networks. Diverse online networking reduces social identification with the network and as a result the willingness to support the network. Hence, diverse online networking compromises the benefits a network provides. Yet, in the absence of similarity, there is also evidence that people attribute others in their online networks with characteristics of their own to perceive them as similar. Shared characteristics function as a reason to identify and compensate for the lack of formal similarity when business networks become more diverse. Moreover, the specific features and functions of professional SNS besides contact recommendations can compensate for the lack of identification.
... In the organizational context, serendipity can be described as a fortunate discovery of new ideas, solutions, or insights, prompted by an individual's interaction with information, objects, or people [1,2]. Recent organizational research has highlighted the notion that also Twitter users experience serendipity [3][4][5]. ey commonly use Twitter in search of profession-related information that can assist them in better performing their work [6]. ey also engage in conversations on topics of professional interest in order to find new contacts and collaboration opportunities [4,7,8]. ...
... ey also engage in conversations on topics of professional interest in order to find new contacts and collaboration opportunities [4,7,8]. Researchers have suggested that Twitter-based accidental, though fortunate, discoveries of information and new contacts can facilitate task innovation in organizations [5,7]. Task innovation is defined as the extent to which the use of an IT application helps users create and try out new ideas in their work [9]. ...
... Task innovation is defined as the extent to which the use of an IT application helps users create and try out new ideas in their work [9]. Examples of Twitter-based task innovation include increased personal productivity of knowledge workers via recommendations of digital tools by their early adopters of new technologies [5], new collaborative research and development projects via informal discussions with representatives from other industries [8], and expansion of business partnerships by engaging in discussions with weak ties via "contacts of contacts" [3]. Task innovation is considered a key factor in organizational success and competitive advantage [10][11][12]. ...
Article
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Serendipity refers to unexpected encounters with ideas or insights and their intentional application to achieve favorable outcomes. Despite extensive prior studies, the concept lacks theoretical logic and empirical validation regarding the role of an intentional act in the relationship between serendipitous encounters and their favorable outcomes. Drawing from self-determination theory, we develop a model that highlights the role of needs satisfaction in explaining this relationship. Positioning the empirical context to fortunate discoveries of information and social connections in professional use of Twitter, we validate the model by a cross-sectional survey study of 473 users. The model builds on the observation that individuals’ serendipitous encounters are associated with Twitter-enabled innovation, that is, a contextualized form of task innovation. The study findings support the research model revealing that serendipitous encounters are positively associated with needs satisfaction and that needs satisfaction is positively associated with Twitter-enabled innovation. In other words, fortunate discoveries of new information and contacts increase Twitter users’ intent to utilize the platform in new ways to accomplish work when the three key psychological needs of autonomy, competence, and relatedness are satisfied.
... However, in a study conducted by Northeastern University, many hiring managers found recent college graduates lacking, and Table 1 identifies typical skills employers believed lacking in recent graduates (Hechinger Report, 2014). Many of these skills are not unique to social media and yet some have suggested the use of digital/social media tools and projects in the classroom environment can develop needed skills and learning (Atwong, 2015;Parise, Whelan, & Todd, 2015). ...
... Additionally, research suggests use of social media can stimulate creativity skills (Parise et al., 2015) and foster cross-functional integration (Findlay, 2014). ...
Article
Purpose The marketplace demands a technological skillset among our college graduates, and scholars acknowledge the educational underpinnings (or lack thereof) regarding technology and its place in marketing education. The current research, therefore, aims to explore how academic institutions and programs have responded to coercive, mimetic and normative isomorphic pressures in reshaping the experiences of current marketing students. Design/methodology/approach To understand this pressure and its implications with regards to the marketing curriculum, this research explores the integration of technology into the marketing classroom via the three forces of institutional isomorphic change: coercive forces, mimetic processes and normative pressures. The current research uses both primary and secondary data to examine how isomorphism is occurring in digital marketing education. Findings We find that the integration of technology into the classroom comes from the forces of institutional isomorphic change. Although these forces are pressuring business schools to include technology in their marketing curriculum, a widespread adoption of this necessary media is yet to follow. Research limitations/implications From a research perspective, this paper portrays the forces that are acting to disrupt teaching and learning in the current global marketplace. Previous research tends to focus on how educators can teach a particular subject area. This paper brings together forces of change as related to educators, students and managers. Practical implications Educators and their educational institutions have to continue to learn to teach digital marketing. Students have a role to play in that they have to be agents of change for a stronger and newer marketing curriculum. Finally, managers need to partner with educators and students to create a stronger environment for learning practical tools. Originality/value Weber (2013) utilized this theoretical foundation for understanding how such pressures impacted the coverage and offering of courses addressing ethical, social and sustainability issues in graduate marketing curricula. This research within the digital marketing educational arena is the first to attempt to understand technology integration into marketing education.
... Having a network of strong versus weak ties, or a combination of both, may result in different creative outcomes. A network consisting of strong ties would be more "homogenous" than a combination of both strong and weak ties, and the latter seems to be more advantageous to creativity as it provides for an exchange in a more diverse context (Aubke, 2014;Parise, Whelan, & Todd, 2015). ...
... The present study did not include other potential confounding variables related to SM users such as the heterogeneity of the SM network (Parise, Whelan, & Todd, 2015) or the number of followers or ties (Aubke, 2014). Future studies can examine if frequency of reaction (i.e., retweets) and number of followers impact creativity. ...
Article
This study explored the relationship between social media (SM) use and creativity. The data collected from 407 participants included indicators such as time spent using SM, frequency of SM use, purposes for using SM, and the nature of SM use. The data involved two aspects of creativity: ideational behavior and creative activity and accomplishment. Correlational analyses indicate that SM use is positively related to both creativity measures. Overall, the active use of SM (e.g., sending a post) is more related to creativity than the passive use (e.g., reading others’ posts); and the link between creativity and SM use is more evident for certain platforms (i.e., Twitter) than others (e.g., Instagram). Ideational behavior and creative activity were also found to be higher among those who use SM primarily for expressing their ideas and opinions, gleaning information on topics to discuss and self‐education and learning compared with those who use it primarily for entertainment or relaxation. None of the creativity measures used was related to extraversion and excessive use of SM. Our findings indicate that SM is not necessarily a negative factor for creativity; it may even be a useful platform to support new ideas and projects.
... A long line of research concerning social capital has shown that people's business networks can influence their personal work performance, career success, job search, product innovation, and creativity [1,7,12,17,36]. Especially when it comes to product innovation and creativity, a diverse network that provides access to a rich set of information and new perspectives is most beneficial [4,8,23,30]. For knowledge workers, who rely on the combination of different views to create new ideas, methods, and approaches to the newly arising complexities of our time, professional social networking sites (PSNS) such as LinkedIn or the German platform Xing offer opportunities of unprecedented extent. ...
... While in a private context it is perfectly fine to have relationships with others that are similar in age, interests, and hobbies, in a professional context the homophily principle is against the requirements of an eligible business network. In a professional context, namely, a diverse network which provides access to non-redundant information, different talents, perspectives, and skills is what people need [4,8,23,30]. ...
... Organizations that actively create mutual ties with followers are thus sending a signal of their interest in creating an online community. They are also the mechanism by which the organization gains access to new information (Parise et al., 2015). Yet there is tremendous variation in how organizations use the formal connecting tool. ...
... Saxton and Wang (2014) found a relationship between the size of nonprofit organizations' Facebook fan network and the financial resources obtained through crowdfunding efforts. González-Bailón et al. (2011) found network position to be related to the spread of information, while Parise et al. (2015) found network-level tie strength increased employees' likelihood of developing good ideas; in other words, social media capital fosters intellectual capital. Relatedly, there is a body of health communication research testing for the relationship between online social capital and health outcomes (Beaudoin and Tao, 2007;Stefanone et al., 2011). ...
Article
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The near-universal organizational participation in social media is predicated on the belief there are some tangible or intangible new resources to be had through tweeting, pinning, posting, friending, and sharing. We argue the linchpin of any payoff from engagement in social media is a special form of social capital we refer to as social media capital, and offer a conceptual framework for understanding its nature, acquisition, and expenditure. This paper contributes to existing literature by elaborating a new type of organizational resource and then synthesizing and extending research on the processes through which organizations can translate social media efforts into meaningful organizational outcomes. Understanding this causal chain is critical not only for measuring the return on investment from social media use but also for developing accounting information systems that are both adaptable to social resources and better able to exploit the data analytic and forecasting capabilities of real-time social media data.
... In other words, informal relationships that workers may nurture through the use of social media as individually held social capital can benefit not just the individual holding it, but also the organization for which that individual works. For example, a recent study of Twitter use suggests that Twitter users (particularly those with a diverse network) tend to generate more innovative ideas for the enterprise (Parise, Whelan, & Todd, 2015). ...
Article
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This article provides insight into the transformative role social media may play in informal knowledge sharing in an enterprise by adopting a social capital perspective. This work explores the ways in which the use of social media results in digital transformation of informal ties that provide the social capital needed for knowledge sharing within and across organizations. The effects of social media on social ties are captured by drawing upon a field study of social media adoption by consultants.
... It is this idea of weak ties that this paper will focus on, and the role weak ties play in the formation of new social connections. As Granovetter (1973;1983) first demonstrated and others have developed, dispersed communities (Pickering & King, 1995), communities that have a more diverse range of ideas circulating (Parise, Whelan & Todd, 2015), and the interoperability between stronger network clusters all rely on the presence of weak ties (Haythornthwaite, 2002). Such ties are framed in terms of limited time, emotion, confidence and intensity invested into the tie relationship (Granovetter, 1973). ...
Article
Full Text Available: http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/22041451.2017.1321093 This paper uses a case study drawn from the Twitter activity around a New Zealand Hui-style conference to explore the role that sharing playful shoefies (selfies of shoes) has in building trust and weak tie bonds between disparate conference participants. By considering the shoefie as a place where participants can perform salience and belonging, this paper argues that photographs of shoes fulfil a range of communicative and network functions that are underserved by the other communicative spaces available at the Hui. Furthermore, this paper argues that the structure of the Hui itself, as opposed to more formalised academic conference structures, further leverages the informality and playfulness of the shoefie in order to fulfil its specific goals of community engagement and equality among participants.
... As such, the paper offers a navigating template for the significant body of material available on this technique and presents an initial framework by which researchers and practitioners can traverse the complex practical decisions associated with this methodology. As businesses increasingly seek efficient forms of identifying and understanding interactive patterns and phenomena both within and outside of the organization (Krackhardt & Hanson, 1993;Parise, Whelan, & Todd, 2015), in addition to exploring and capitalizing on business networks (Håkansson & Ford, 2002;Johanson & Vahlne, 2009;Monaghan et al., 2014;Wilkinson & Young, 2002), this research illustrates the utility of SNA in providing an accessible and nuanced heuristic for managers, businesses and researchers to explore formal and informal relational engagement between actors within a well-constructed research design. By nuanced heuristic, we refer to the capacity for SNA to offer an engaged mechanism and tool for analysts to gather insights on the relationships, interactions and connections within their team, organization or community (Anklam, 2007;Baker, 2000). ...
Article
Although social network analysis (SNA) offers an increasingly insightful perspective on the relational and structural properties of organizational activity, discourse on how to manage and coordinate its application is relatively scarce. Aimed largely at an applied network analyst, this paper presents a greater understanding of how SNA has been previously discussed in management studies, what the main points are and where these issues can be addressed prior to and during the research process to ensure network data are efficiently managed, analyzed and interpreted. Engaging with several practical concerns associated with SNA – including network boundary specification, data reliability, context of inquiry and network visualizations – a viable framework is developed that is accessible to managers, consultants or researchers in facilitating the structuring, collection, handling and analysis of network data. The discussion illustrates the relevance of this perspective for both a practitioner and a theoretical audience.
... Also, crossing project, group, or department boundaries should create employee visibility into the unrelated or partly related work of others, which can result in unexpected insights. Parise, Whelan, and Todd (2015) report, for example, that employees with a Twitter network that crosses knowledge boundaries tend to generate better ideas. However, ESM's blurring of boundaries could have negative consequences if within-group communication is impeded by concerns that outsiders might be watching and listening. ...
Article
This editorial preface presents a call for more case-based research on social media topics. It identifies and explores several applications of social media that provide interesting research questions to motivate future articles for the Journal of Information Technology Case and Application Research. Download article at http://www.tandfonline.com/eprint/UufHMZQ4K6BxEkz4ShhC/full
... CS managers should involve R&D early in the process, and sometimes before the implementation of CS in order to promote the CS platform, avoid internal competition, and to reduce the difficulties in finding internal customers or intrapreneurs. As suggested by Djelassi and Decoopman (2013), CS is situated within an entrepreneurial logic and firms should involve cross-functional managers through board meetings or pre-test platforms, making them act as an idea connector (Parise et al., 2015), an internal actor that assimilates and exploits external ideas. ...
Conference Paper
Crowdsourcing (CS) for innovation is defined as the outsourcing of problem solving or creative tasks to the crowd. The literature points out the benefits for developing absorptive capacities (ACAP). In this specific open CS context, little is known about the integrative actions for this external knowledge. This explorative research tries to fill this gap by considering five cases of CS for innovation. When implementing CS for innovation, we show that firms succeed in developing potential absorptive capacities (acquisition and assimilation of the crowd’s knowledge), yet experience significant difficulties in developing realized absorptive capacities (transformation and exploitation of the crowd’s knowledge). Integrative actions implemented during the realized absorptive capacities (RACAP) step are not sufficiently strong to create new value with captured knowledge, and other factors like organizational integration should be considered.
... As such, the paper is intended to serve as a navigating tool for the significant body of material available on this technique and present an initial framework by which researchers and practitioners can traverse the complex practical decisions associated with this methodology. As businesses increasingly seek efficient forms of identifying and understanding interactive patterns and phenomenon both within and outside of the organization (Krackhardt & Hanson, 1993;Parise, Whelan, & Todd, 2015), this research illustrates the utility of SNA in providing an accessible and nuanced heuristic to managers, businesses and researchers as a means of exploring formal and informal relational engagement between actors within a well-constructed research design. Following this, a second contribution is the capacity to advance the discourse beyond earlier technical studies (such as those offered by Conway (2014) and Carpenter, Li, and Jiang (2012). ...
... Highly followed stakeholders can propel an organization's messages to a wider audience, increasing its visibility, legitimacy, and influence. The second type of resource is diversity, with a substantial body of evidence showing how diversity in social networks is related to organizational performance (Doerfel et al., 2017;Guo & Acar, 2005), innovation (Parise, Whelan, & Todd, 2015) and the generation of insights and opportunities (Burt, 1992;Granovetter, 1973). Although we know much about the outcomes of diverse networks, we know little about the determinants. ...
Article
Nonprofits use social media to pursue a broad range of mission-related outcomes. Given the centrality of user connections and social networks on these sites, attaining these outcomes is contingent on first generating a stock of online social capital through investing in online relationships. Yet, little is known empirically about this process. To better understand the return on social media, this study develops empirical measures of four key dimensions of social media–based social capital centering on the nature of nonprofits’ network positions and stakeholder ties. The study then tests a series of hypotheses relating the increase in social capital to different types of stakeholder engagement tactics. Using Twitter data on 198 community foundations, the study finds that content with multiple communication cues and intersectoral stakeholder targeting predict higher levels of social capital; communicative and stakeholder diversity, thus, appear to play a key role in the successful organizational use of social media.
... Evans and Basole (2016) and Basole (2016) follow early work by Weiss and Gangadharan (2010) in investigating the network patterns latent in mashup ecosystems, an important manifestation of the digital economy that allows true self-organization in developing networks of platforms and complementary products. Parise, Whelan, and Todd (2015) present an additional recent example of how to utilize network analysis in combination with social network data in analyzing how network structure affects innovation activities. In the large majority of these examples, however, the authors do not refer specifically to innovation ecosystems. ...
Thesis
More often than ever before, innovation activities are crossing organizational boundaries and taking place in the spaces between formal, organizational structures. This new context for innovation activities is increasingly referred to as an innovation ecosystem. Open innovation, co-creation, user-driven innovation, API and platform economies, and business ecosystems are key drivers of the transformation. Innovation ecosystems are open, dynamic systems that cross geographical as well as organizational boundaries and include financial, technological, and political dimensions. Talented humans have a crucial driving role in ecosystemic innovation activities. Innovation ecosystems set a new framework for analyzing, investigating, and therefore measuring innovation. Measuring and visualizing innovation is difficult, particularly within innovation ecosystems where activities take very complex forms and even identifying all relevant actors and stakeholders is challenging. At the same time, ecosystem-level analyses of innovation ecosystem structures are imperative for three groups: innovation ecosystem scholars, policy and decision makers, and innovation ecosystem actors. Moreover, new sources of digital data on innovation activities have become available, introducing new opportunities to investigate innovation ecosystems at the ecosystem level. In this dissertation, we seek to develop new means to utilize digital data in analyzing innovation ecosystems at the ecosystem level. We take an action design research approach to develop the means to investigate the structural properties of innovation ecosystems at the ecosystem level by using visual network analytics. We start from the realization that interconnectedness is a key property of innovation ecosystems. Addressing innovation ecosystems as networks, that is, as collections of pairs of interconnected innovation ecosystem actors, allows scholars and practitioners to gain insight into innovation ecosystem structures and the structural roles of individual ecosystem actors. To determine how innovation ecosystems should be modeled and analyzed as networks, we investigate several innovation ecosystems representing regional, metropolitan, national, and international contexts as well as investigating the context of programmatic activities that support innovation and growth. Our main objective in the dissertation is to develop a process model for data-driven visual network analytics of innovation ecosystems. Visual network analytics is a valuable method for investigating and mapping the innovation ecosystem structure. In the proposed approach, transactional microdata on innovation ecosystem actors and their interconnections is collected from various digital sources. Innovation ecosystem actors are represented as network nodes that are connected through transactions, including investments and acquisitions and advisory, founder, and contributor affiliations. Network metrics are used to quantify actors’ structural positions. Interactive visual analytics tools are used to support the visual exploration of the innovation ecosystem under investigation by using both top-down and bottom-up strategies. This work makes several contributions to the art and science of data-driven visual network analytics of innovation ecosystems. Most importantly, the dissertation proposes the ostinato model, an iterative, user-centric, process-automated model for data-driven visual network analytics. The ostinato model simultaneously supports the automation of the process and enables interactive and transparent exploration. The model has two phases: data collection and refinement, and network creation and analysis. The data collection and refinement phase is further divided into entity index creation, Web/API crawling, scraping, and data aggregation. The network construction and analysis phase is composed of filtering in entities, node and edge creation, metrics calculation, node and edge filtering, entity index refinement, layout processing, and visual properties configuration. The cycle of exploration and automation characterizes the model and is embedded in each phase. In addition to the ostinato model, we contribute a set of design guidelines for modeling and visualizing innovation ecosystems as networks. Finally, we contribute to the empirical body of knowledge on innovation ecosystems through a series of investigations of innovation ecosystems of different levels of abstraction and complexity. Innovation ecosystem scholars, policy makers, orchestrators, and other stakeholders in the innovation ecosystem under investigation in this dissertation have subscribed to the approach presented herein. The design guidelines, together with the ostinato model, allow innovation ecosystem investigators and actors an opportunity to significantly advance in utilizing visual network analytics in managing and orchestrating innovation ecosystems. Further research and development of supporting processes and tools are needed to take full advantage of the presented approach in analyzing, investigating, facilitating, and orchestrating interorganizational innovation activities.
... data mining in innovation processes (Chen, et al., 2012;Liu, et al., 2011). Previous research shows that employees that use Twitter both have better ideas and the diversity of their Twitter network is linked to the quality of their ideas (Parise, Whelan & Todd, 2015). Furthermore, Twitter users who combine idea scouting and idea connecting were the most inno- vative. ...
Article
Full-text available
Knowledge transfer constitutes the basis of the learning process in an organization and the creation of permanent relationships between the science and business worlds is the fundamental factor which improves its efficiency. The relationship should be characterized by balancing the benefits and avoiding conflicts of interests. Considerations relating to the knowledge transfer to enterprises and economy must include identifying all factors which determine the process, especially pointing out the potential barriers and manners of passing the knowledge. The aim of the paper is to identify both the enablers (premises) and barriers (blockers) of knowledge transfer in selected EU countries. The additional aim of the article is to prioritize particular types of the IT enterprise’s perspective using the importance index, as well as to identify the factors which determine the development of knowledge transfer in Poland, Sweden and Portugal. The structured interview method is used in the paper as well as comparative analysis method. The research was conducted in January 2016, among 18 IT enterprises from Sweden, Poland and Portugal. The paper presents part of the results. The study was carried out as part of an international project COTRANS (Conditionings of Knowledge Transfers and Innovative Activity of Enterprises.
... Similarly, users frequently recommend resources to each other over social networking sites. Parise, Whelan, and Todd (2015) in their recent article demonstrate that employees who use Twitter had better ideas than those who didn't and moreover those with a diverse Twitter networkone that exposes them to people and ideas they don't already knowtend to generate ideas of better quality. ...
Article
In creative tasks, there is a need to explore the space of available information in order to come up with diverse views before converging to a solution. In such tasks, typical search engines that follow the direct search paradigm fail to inspire users. It is hypothesized that contrary to typical engines, interactive exploratory search, which aims at revealing latent, alternative directions in the information space enabling user orientation and engagement, is better suited to assist users in their quest for serendipitous discoveries and inspiration. In this study, an interactive exploratory search tool that combines diversification of content and sources with a user interface design that visualizes clues from the social chatter – generated with micro-blogging services such as Twitter – and lets users interactively explore the available information space is presented. A profiling service and recommendation module in charge of delivering personalized social content complements the setting. A pilot and two task-based user studies comparing our system to a query-based baseline indicate that our system significantly improves inspirational discoveries by providing access to more interesting and serendipitous information.
... As such, the paper offers a navigating template for the significant body of material available on this technique and presents an initial framework by which researchers and practitioners can traverse the complex practical decisions associated with this methodology. As businesses increasingly seek efficient forms of identifying and understanding interactive patterns and phenomenon both within and outside of the organization (Krackhardt & Hanson, 1993;Parise, Whelan, & Todd, 2015), in addition to exploring and capitalizing on business networks (Håkansson & Ford, 2002;Johanson & Vahlne, 2009;Monaghan et al., 2014;Wilkinson & Young, 2002), this research illustrates the utility of SNA in providing an accessible and nuanced heuristic to managers, businesses and researchers as a means of exploring formal and informal relational engagement between actors within a well-constructed research design. By nuanced heuristic, we refer to the capacity for SNA to offer an engaged mechanism and tool for analysts to gather insights on the relationships, interactions and connections within their team, organization or community (Anklam, 2007;Baker, 2000). ...
Article
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While social network analysis (SNA) offers an increasingly insightful perspective on the relational and structural properties of organizational activity, analysis of its practical application in management studies is relatively scarce. One fundamental oversight within current literature is a nuanced review of the choices, challenges and complications with using SNA within international management (IM) research and practice. Thus, based on an ongoing exploratory study on the relational engagement of subnational actors with foreign direct investment (FDI), this paper investigates the process of collecting, handling and analyzing social network data. While capturing formal, structural and informal engagement patterns, we illustrate four fundamental areas of utilizing SNA which must be carefully considered - network visualizations, boundary specification, data reliability and, context of inquiry. The primary contribution of this paper rests between the theoretical and technical reviews of SNA, in showcasing the merit of this research approach as a functional and effective tool in representing interactive organizational patterns within management-related research. Moreover, a framework is developed for researchers and practitioners to serve as a preliminary roadmap to embarking on SNA.
... Twitter users (particularly those with a diverse network) tend to have access to and generate more innovative ideas for the enterprise than non-users (Parise, Whelan, & Todd, 2015 Managers can galvanize the inflow of knowledge and innovation by encouraging knowledge workers to cross-organizational boundaries using their social ties. We observed several pragmatic uses of social media for sharing across boundaries. ...
Article
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Historically, organizations owned and controlled the information technologies (IT) their employees used: telephone, inter-office memos, mainframes and timesharing systems. Today, employees often want to use their own IT: not only personal smart phones and tablets, but also Twitter and Google Docs. This new trend can diversify and extend enterprise the IT infrastructure, but leaves organizations struggling with technology uses that they cannot control. With the emergence of new technological paradigms in consumer markets and organizations, the management of IT infrastructure requires a more pragmatic and holistic approach that goes beyond simple technological considerations. In this paper, we present a three-part framework—technology, people and practice— that helps managers understand and mitigate these tensions. Drawing on two empirical studies of European executives and consultants from multiple management consulting firms, the paper further outlines changes taking place along the three aspects of the framework. It concludes by discussing three distinct approaches to the management of organizational IT infrastructure (passive, reactive, and pragmatic), and by offering greater insight regarding a pragmatic approach.
... Lastly, technology fosters creativity by allowing an individual scout and obtain diverse ideas from others. Parise et al. (2015) reported the results from a 5-year study conducted at MIT about the relationships between the quality of the ideas and diversity of one's social network. They found that the quality of ideas has a positive correlation relationship with the level of diversity of their twitter networks. ...
Article
Recognizing its importance, most countries have prioritized creative thinking as a critical ability that students need to develop before they enter the workforce. Thailand is no exception. For teachers to create learning environments that foster students’ creativity, teachers need a research-based understanding of creativity. Eighty-nine Thai in-service teachers responded to an online questionnaire that surveyed their conceptions of creativity and use of technology to foster creativity in their classrooms. The results of the survey revealed that the Thai in-service teachers were less readily recognizing the mini-c and Pro-c. Also, they did not seem to deem originality/novelty as a necessary criterion for creativity. More results of the survey will be further discussed.
... In addition to usage method, selection of these team members is also important. When the person's social network diversification increases, exposing to different fields also increase, thus it is obtained different perspectives and to challenged people's current thinking [52]. Even gathered information is not directly focused on one's business, it can help to be set effective relationship between ideas and assessments. ...
Conference Paper
Companies need New Product Development (NPD) more than ever to satisfy rapidly changing customer needs, to secure and increase their share in the global market. Continuous innovation stream is required to succeed there with best promising ideas to be selected at the fuzzy Front End (FFE). The fuzziness of FE is remedied here by creating an intelligent, self-adaptive and flexible decision model. The proposed model is non-bureaucratic, manages fuzziness, and it is capable to provide insight for future trends. Furthermore, it contributes to knowledge accumulation by maintaining all data of ideas, both accepted or rejected, enabling knowledge based design. The intelligent is provided by the growth of idea, their computation and assessment. I.e. the model itself weighs ideas independently and adaptively by respecting the size and population of the associated idea group. This is achieved by using K-means clustering algorithm by which meaningful changes in accumulated ideas are detected to calculate trend. The synthesized model supports managers and researchers to organize the FFE.
... Recent findings by Thoma and colleagues (2018) revealed that promoting articles using podcasts and infographics positively impacted both research dissemination and readability in terms of the Altmetric scores and abstract views. Furthermore, it is not only in relation to research dissemination and visibility that the use of technology has proven to be influential, it is also in terms of fostering creativity; employees with a diverse Twitter network tend to generate better ideas (Parise et al., 2015). ...
Thesis
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Today, intense competition among higher education institutions (HEIs) is ongoing to achieve cutting-edge publications, attain research funding, possess scientific patents, keep abreast of emerging technologies and adapt quickly to everyday changes.Innovativeness has become the buzzword in HEIs, especially in those seeking prosperity and advancement. Innovativeness here refers to the individual’s disposition to accept changes, try new experiences, deal with ambiguity, take risks and embrace novel ideas. In the digital age, staff members experience nonstop changes in their workplace environments and have no option but to welcome such changes with open arms. Otherwise, they will most likely get a warm job farewell party. Despite the obvious significance of individual innovativeness, there remains a paucity of evidence on the antecedents and consequences of individual innovativeness in higher education.Two aims were established for this doctoral dissertation. For one, the dissertation sought to investigate the psychological and organisational factors contributing to individual innovativeness. For the other, the dissertation pursued the examination ofthe consequences of innovativeness and provided evidence on whether models studied in business and management fields are also valid for the higher education context. This article-based dissertation consists of four publications. Each one forms a part of the whole project. Study I, which was dedicated to organisational factors, explored how staff members perceive the cultures and growth atmospheres and the relationship between them in their departments/schools. It also examined whether differences exist in cultural perceptions based on staff members’ demographic variables. Study II, which was dedicated to psychological factors, examined the roles of implicit theory and goal orientation as predictors of innovativeness. Study IIIinvestigated the interaction between psychological factors (implicit theory and goal orientation) and organisational culture in predicting innovativeness. Study IV had a twofold objective. It inspected the staff members’ usage of technological devices, Office 365 (O365) Cloud services and social media. It also set out to prove the power of individual innovativeness in predicting technology usage. The research followed a cross-sectional correlational survey design. A total sample of 742 staff members working at Tampere University participated in the research. Two online self-reported questionnaires were administered during the 2015–2016 and 2016–2017 academic years. We analysed the data employing basic and advanced statistics, including structural equation modelling (SEM) and multilevel Bayesian path analysis.The findings suggested that one’s goal orientations are most relevant in interpreting his/her innovativeness or willingness to change. More specifically, individuals adopting mastery goal orientations (focusing on learning and improving one’s knowledge and skills) are more likely to be innovators, whereas individuals adopting performance-avoidance goal orientations (avoiding looking incompetent and incapable relative to others) are less likely to be innovators. Furthermore, our findings indicated that the dominant perceived culture at Tampere HEIs is Clan culture, which is characterised by coherent relationships among staff members and considerable attention p aid to their professional development and gratification.In addition, only the Clan and Adhocracy culture types were found to supportprofessional growth. Contrary to previous studies, this dissertation showed that departmental culture had neither a direct effect on innovativeness nor a moderation effect on the relationships between psychological factors and innovativeness. In terms of consequences, the results showed that technology wassatisfactorily used by the staff members, although their professional usage was less than their personal usage. Our findings also confirmed that innovativeness is a significant positive–albeit weak–predictor of staff members’ usage of devices, non-academic social media and institutional O 365 services. Finally, the dissertation showed that academics who were earlier adopters of academic social media and commercial services were later adopters of institutional O365 services.The findings have a number of important implications for theory and practice.Theoretically, this dissertation is one of the first attempts to integrate implicit theory and goal orientation, together with organisational culture, into one model predicting innovativeness. The model is also among the few that employ a multilevel modelling technique, which is more appropriate for this kind of data. It is worth noting that the results of the multilevel analysis emphasised the essential role of goal orientations, but not implicit theory, in predicting innovativeness. These results call researchers to revisit the mediation role of goal orientation between implicit theory and human attributes, taking into account the nested structure of their data. Moreover, this dissertation calls for a re-examination of the role of culture, taking the type of institution into account (academic vs business). Practically, the findings suggest several implications for HEI administrators and practitioners. First, the dissertation draws the attention of managers in that by allowing the staff flexibility, discretion and autonomy, this implicitly guarantees their professional growth. Second, administrators and supervisors should stimulate staff members’ orientations towards mastery goals and inhibit their orientations towards performance-avoidance go als. For example, feedback and appraisal should be self -referenced rather than other-referenced based. The criterion for performance judgment should focus on efforts rather than ability. Third, HEIs should take wise and fast decisions about technology adoption because late adoption implicitly means that staff members will resort to other commercial alternatives.
... Twitter is a dynamic social networking site that is a "gateway to solution options" and a method to achieve different perspectives and to experiment with one's current thinking (Parise et al., 2015). Twitter is a micro-blogging server and social networking site for wide-ranging access and use (Gunawardena et al., 2009). ...
Article
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We stand on the brink of a technological revolution that will on a very basic level change the way we live, work, and relate to one another, provides a new mechanism for companies to promote products and services. This modernistic electronic advertising concept is commercially known as mobile advertising, it offers an elective approach to reach targeted customers more constructively and build a stronger and more individual relationship with them.The main objective of this study is to examine the relationship of mobile advertising on Aaker's model; brand equity dimensionsand determine the mediating effect of Gen-Y attitude.Data collectedin Dubai, UAE, using Structural Equation Model AMOS and SPSS software version 22® to analyzes, the sample size was (409)population includes Generation Y age who are familiar with data and using smartphones.The results indicated that, mobile advertising (p< .05) and Gen-Y attitude (p< .05) were significant predictors of brand equity; similarly, mobile advertising (p< .05) was a significant predictor of Gen-Y attitude, these three variables have explained 45% and 69% of variances in Brand Equity and Gen-Y attitude respectively.The mediating test using the bootstrapping method based on the 95% bias-corrected (BC) confidence interval (CI) has shown that Gen-Y attitude partially mediates the relationship between Mobile advertising and brand
... Research on CI and the broader literature on open innovation has linked online channels to enhanced access to external sources of ideation (Dahlander & Wallin, 2006;Füller et al., 2008;Leminen et al., 2015). Recent work contrasting the usefulness of online open ICT platforms for ideation with more traditional mediums report online users generating higher quality ideas than non-users (Parise et al., 2015;Poetz & Schreier, 2012). However, exposure to a vast amount of distant knowledge, largely as a result of the inclusions of new ICT-enabled channels of ideations, can easily result in 'crowding' (Bergendahl & Magnusson, 2015;Piezunka & Dahlander, 2014). ...
Article
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In the context of implementing collaborative innovation, a range of digitally enabled infrastructures impact core organizational activities. Automotive manufacturing is one such industry where competitors now openly collaborate, facilitated through new technologies, in an effort to enhance collective innovation systems. We conducted a longitudinal case study of the first open innovation network in the German automotive industry to determine how online and offline channels interact to fuel firms' joint search for external ideas. Delving into the physical, virtual and cognitive enablers of collaborative innovation, our findings suggest that, while online platforms can help to facilitate knowledge sharing processes that promote collaborative innovation, firms implementing digitally enabled collaborative ideation need to develop additional mechanisms based on stronger offline interactions. As such, our findings contribute to a better understanding of how online technologies can facilitate knowledge sharing processes to enhance collaborative innovation.
... First, our results show that being innovative with new technologies is positively associated with engineers' creativity. This finding relates to the most recent study performed by Parise et al. (2015). ...
Article
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The purpose of this paper is to investigate how the use of social media can facilitate employee creativity. Departing from theories on social capital and knowledge management, this study examines the relationship among individual characteristics, the use of social technologies, and employee creativity. The main hypothesis of the study is that online social networking mediates the relationship between personal innovativeness and creativity. Data were obtained through an online survey of 80 engineers and 12 managers working in a large IT company listed by the Fortune 500 (n1=80, n2=12). Our empirical strategy relies on fixed-effects structural equation modeling and confirmatory factor analysis with a quasi-experimental design to study the structural relationship among creativity, online social connectivity, and personal innovativeness. The study provides three major findings. First, the results show that personal innovativeness regarding new technologies is positively associated with creativity. Second, 18% of the association between personal innovativeness and creativity is explained by the latent mediator online social connectivity (a construct of online networking and knowledge management). More specifically, the partial mediation is driven by online networking, specifically establishing new connections. Finally, contrary to our expectations, there is no significant evidence that the relationship between creativity and personal innovativeness is mediated by online social knowledge management. Understanding the ways in which online connections and online knowledge management as well as personal innovativeness are related to employee creativity helps in building innovative organizations. This study may facilitate recruitment and selection strategies and encourage organizations to implement platforms with user-friendly functionalities of connecting with other employees and searching data. The main question of this study is whether all features related to social technologies make people more creative. Evidence is still scarce, but there are hints that creativity is not only an innate personal feature but also a social phenomenon. This study explains the benefits of online social connectivity for enhancing employee creativity.
... (c) Idea Networking e the competency of spending time talking with a network of individuals who are diverse in both background and perspective and constantly looking for new ideas via communication with people who may offer a fundamentally different point of view of things. This competency was mentioned in other studies as well (Barak & Usher, 2019;Kanter, 1996;Reid & de Brentani, 2015;OECD, 2011;Parise, Whelan, & Todd, 2015;Wagner, 2015). (d) Experimenting e the competency of frequently experimenting and exploring the world with a hypothesis-testing mindset: trying new things, experimenting to learn new things, visiting new places, and seeking new information. ...
Article
The study's purpose was to develop a valid and reliable tool for measuring innovative thinking competencies with reference to education. The tool development was guided by the cognitive, experiential, and sociocultural theories. The validity and reliability of the tool were established using quantitative methods through three main stages: Content validity by inter-rater agreement; Construct validity by principle component analysis and confirmatory factor analysis; Concurrent validity by correlations between scales. The participants were ten educators and 743 preservice teachers from two higher education institutions. The findings produced a tool for measuring educational innovative thinking competencies in the context of teacher education.
... The opportunity to recombine ideas and access relevant knowledge is crucial for companies that aim at generating innovation (Burt, 1993;Hargadon, 1998;Parise et al., 2015). The likelihood of a company benefiting from new ideas, know-how, and talents is determined not only by the availability of these resources within the city where the company is located (endogenous view suggested by research on urban complexity (Bettencourt et al., 2007;Eagle et al., 2010;Makarem, 2016;Powell et al., 1996;Sorenson and Stuart, 2001)), but also by the opportunity to absorb them from other cities (exogenous view suggested by research on the economics of migration (Florida, 2005;Glaeser, 2011;Keuschnigg et al., 2019)). ...
Article
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While great emphasis has been placed on the role of social interactions as a driver of innovation growth, very few empirical studies have explicitly investigated the impact of social network structures on the innovation performance of cities. Past research has mostly explored scaling laws of socio-economic outputs of cities as determined by, for example, the single predictor of population. Here, by drawing on a publicly available dataset of the startup ecosystem, we build the first Workforce Mobility Network among metropolitan areas in the US. We found that node centrality computed on this network accounts for most of the variability observed in cities’ innovation performance and significantly outperforms other predictors such as population size or density, suggesting that policies and initiatives aiming at sustaining innovation processes might benefit from fostering professional networks alongside other economic or systemic incentives. As opposed to previous approaches powered by census data, our model can be updated in real-time upon open databases, opening up new opportunities both for researchers in a variety of disciplines to study urban economies in new ways, and for practitioners to design tools for monitoring such economies in real-time.
... Recent findings by Thoma and colleagues (2018) revealed that promoting articles using podcasts and infographics positively impacted both research dissemination and readability in terms of the Altmetric scores and abstract views. Furthermore, it is not only in relation to research dissemination and visibility that the use of technology has proven to be influential, it is also in terms of fostering creativity; employees with a diverse Twitter network tend to generate better ideas (Parise et al., 2015). ...
Article
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This article presents a two-phase study exploring the usage of technology in higher education as well as the role of the general innovativeness in predicting the actual use of technology. During the first phase of the study, which involved 502 staff members, a descriptive analysis of their usage of social media, technological devices, and Microsoft Office 365 cloud services was performed, with various demographic variables being considered. During the second phase, which involved a subsample of 106 staff members, structural equation modeling (SEM) was used to examine a model in which the general innovativeness and the demographic variables acted as predictors of the actualized innovativeness. The results showed that the staff used social media, devices, and cloud services quite satisfactorily. The examination of their user profiles revealed that there were significant differences among the staff members on the basis of their demographic variables, especially their gender, job type, and discipline. The results of the SEM showed that the general innovativeness contributed positively, as was expected, to predicting the adoption of devices, non-academic social networking sites and Office 365 cloud services. The results further suggested that males were early adopters of devices, while academics were early adopters of commercial services and academic social networking sites. However, the academics appeared to lag behind the administrators in terms of adopting Office 365 cloud services. The implications of the study and directions for future research are also presented.
... The opportunity to recombine ideas and access relevant knowledge is crucial for companies that aim at generating innovation [30][31][32] . The likelihood of a company benefiting from new ideas, know-how, and talents is determined not only by the availability of these resources within the city where the company is located but also by the opportunity to absorb them from other cities. ...
Preprint
While great emphasis has been placed on the role of social interactions as driver of innovation growth, very few empirical studies have explicitly investigated the impact of social network structures on the innovation performance of cities. Past research has mostly explored scaling laws of socio-economic outputs of cities as determined by, for example, the single predictor of population. Here, by drawing on a publicly available dataset of the startup ecosystem, we build the first Workforce Mobility Network among US metropolitan areas. We found that node centrality computed on this network accounts for most of the variability observed in cities' innovation performance and significantly outperforms other predictors such as population size or density, suggesting that policies and initiatives aiming at sustaining innovation processes might benefit from fostering professional networks alongside other economic or systemic incentives. As opposed to previous approaches powered by census data, our model can be updated in real-time upon open databases, opening up new opportunities both for researchers in a variety of disciplines to study urban economies in new ways, and for practitioners to design tools for monitoring such economies in real-time.
... Recent data suggest that employees develop better ideas for work if they have more diverse Twitter networks. 30 The ability for patients to lurk and listen without participating means that they may be able to learn information by searching with the CTO hashtags without being easily tracked. Whether this practice improves informed decision making on the basis of accurate health information remains unknown. ...
Article
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Twitter use has increased among patients with cancer, advocates, and oncology professionals. Hashtags, a form of metadata, can be used to share content, organize health information, and create virtual communities of interest. Cancer-specific hashtags modeled on a breast cancer community, #bcsm, led to the development of a structured set of hashtags called the cancer tag ontology. In this article, we review how these hashtags have worked with the aim of describing our experience from 2011 to 2017. We discuss useful guidelines for the development and maintenance of health-oriented communities on Twitter, including possible challenges to community sustainability and opportunities for future improvement and research.
... The second type of resource is diversity, with a substantial body of evidence showing how diversity in social networks is related to organizational performance (Doerfel, Atouba, & Harris, 2016;Guo & Acar, 2005), innovation ( Parise et al., 2015), and the generation of insights and opportunities (Burt, 1992;Granovetter, 1973). While we know much about the outcomes of diverse networks, we know little about the determinants. ...
Article
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This study is an exploratory attempt to use automatic linguistic analysis for understanding social media users' news commenting behavior. The study addresses geographically-based dynamics in human-computer interaction, namely, users' tie to a geographic community. Specifically, the study reveals that commenting behavior differs between users of different levels of local community tie. Comments by local users, those with higher level of local community tie, exhibit different linguistic patterns in comparison to national users who are less involved in local community. The linguistic differences are reflected in the use of pronouns, personal pronouns, social words, swear words, anxiety words and anger words. We argue that identification of the difference is crucial in the practice of mining social media conversations for public opinion.
Article
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Purpose This paper aims to systematically find the main research differences and similarities between social media and social networks in marketing research using the bibliometric perspective and provides suggestions for firms to improve their marketing strategies effectively. Design/methodology/approach The methods of co-word analysis and network analysis have been used to analyze the two research fields of social media and social networks. Specifically, this study selects 2,424 articles from 27 marketing academic journals present in the database Web of Science, ranging from January 1, 1996 to August 8, 2020. Findings The results show that social networks and social media are both research hotspots within the discipline of marketing research. The different intimacy nodes of social networks are more complex than social media. Additionally, the research scope of social networks is broader than social media in marketing research as shown by the keyword co-occurrence analysis. The overlap between social media and social networks in marketing research is reflected in the strong focus on their mixed mutual effects. Originality/value This paper explores the differences and similarities between social networks and social media in marketing research from the bibliometric perspective and provides a developing trend of their research hotspots in social media and social networks marketing research by keyword co-occurrence analysis and cluster analysis. Additionally, this paper provides some suggestions for firms looking to improve the efficiency of their marketing strategies from social and economic perspectives.
Chapter
As the coronavirus (COVID-19) grows its impact from China, expanding its catchment into surrounding regions and other countries, increased national and international measures are being taken to contain the outbreak. This perspective paper is written to capture and analyze the various mental state health issues being perceived via emotional analysis of Twitter data during the COVID-19 virus outbreak from a single nation further spread of to the whole world. A data-driven approach with higher accuracy as here can be very useful for a proactive response from the government and citizens. In the proposed work, tweets during the COVID situation have been collected and their sentiments are explored using BERT (Bidirectional Encoder Representation from Transformer) algorithm. BERT is the algorithm that takes text as input, and the trained basis on the epochs (number of passes performed). The performance parameters are computed such as accuracy, precision, recall, and F-measure. Further, the proposed approach is compared with other existing algorithms such as Naïve Bayes (NB), support vector machine (SVM), and logistic regression (LR). The performance measures indicate that the BERT algorithm outperforms all other existing algorithms with an accuracy of 86.7% as compared to 67.3%, 63.4%, and 61.2% with Naïve Bayes, support vector machine, and logistic regression, respectively. The government and other medical health agencies can use the outcomes of this paper for implementing and taking preventative measures to maintain the good mental and physical health of medical staff.
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The authors introduce key concepts, including an individual’s idea space and a fuzzy-crisp continuum for ideas. They explain how their theory conceptualizes information, core beliefs and biases. They examine the process of how new ideas are processed in an idea space, emphasizing subjectivity, awareness and the density of available ideas. They build their theory by considering how different types of ideas interact within idea spaces and create a hierarchy of fuzzy rules. The authors discuss how this process informs the worldviews held by individuals and those shared by groups. The authors present the broad scope of their theory with several interesting examples.
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Motivated by the phenomenon of customer entrepreneurship in China and the associated research gaps, we conduct a case study to explore how customer entrepreneurs realize benefits from light entrepreneurship enabled by guanxi circles and social commerce affordances. Our study derives a process model that describes how customer entrepreneurs benefit from light entrepreneurship through acquiring knowledge and sharing knowledge within guanxi circles embedded in social media. We also demonstrate the roles of the mass entrepreneurship climate and the social commerce affordances in this benefit realization process. This study contributes to the research and practice with respect to technology-enabled customer entrepreneurship.
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In this paper, we argue that the ability of a firm to recognize the value of new, external information, assimilate it, and apply it to commercial ends is critical to its innovative capabilities. We label this capability a firm's absorptive capacity and suggest that it is largely a function of the firm's level of prior related knowledge. The discussion focuses first on the cognitive basis for an individual's absorptive capacity including, in particular, prior related knowledge and diversity of background. We then characterize the factors that influence absorptive capacity at the organizational level, how an organization's absorptive capacity differs from that of its individual members, and the role of diversity of expertise within an organization. We argue that the development of absorptive capacity, and, in turn, innovative performance are history- or path-dependent and argue how lack of investment in an area of expertise early on may foreclose the future development of a technical capability in that area. We formulate a model of firm investment in research and development (R&D), in which R&D contributes to a firm's absorptive capacity, and test predictions relating a firm's investment in R&D to the knowledge underlying technical change within an industry. Discussion focuses on the implications of absorptive capacity for the analysis of other related innovative activities, including basic research, the adoption and diffusion of innovations, and decisions to participate in cooperative R&D ventures.
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The present study integrated a number of streams of research on the antecedents of innovation to develop and test a model of individual innovative behavior. Hypothesizing that leadership, individual problem-solving style, and work group relations affect innovative behavior directly and indirectly through their influence on perceptions of the climate for innovation, we used structural equation analysis to test the parameters of the proposed model simultaneously and also explored the moderating effect of task characteristics. The model explained approximately 37 percent of the variance in innovative behavior. Task type moderated the relationship between leader role expectations and innovative behavior.
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This paper introduces the concept of knowledge networks to explain why some business units are able to benefit from knowledge residing in other parts of the company while others are not. The core premise of this concept is that a proper understanding of effective interunit knowledge sharing in a multiunit firm requires a joint consideration of relatedness in knowledge content among business units and the network of lateral interunit relations that enables task units to access related knowledge. Results from a study of 120 new product development projects in 41 business units of a large multiunit electronics company showed that project teams obtained more existing knowledge from other units and completed their projects faster to the extent that they had short interunit network paths to units that possessed related knowledge. In contrast, neither network connections nor extent of related knowledge alone explained the amount of knowledge obtained and project completion time. The results also showed a contingent effect of having direct interunit relations in knowledge networks: While established direct relations mitigated problems of transferring noncodified knowledge, they were harmful when the knowledge to be transferred was codified, because they were less needed but still involved maintenance costs. These findings suggest that research on knowledge transfers and synergies in multiunit firms should pursue new perspectives that combine the concepts of network connections and relatedness in knowledge content.
Levinthal, the term "absorptive capacity" refers to an organization's ability to assimilate and replicate new knowledge gained from external sources. A substantial body of research demonstrates that absorptive capacity contributes directly and indirectly to company performance
Coined by Wesley M. Cohen and Daniel A. Levinthal, the term "absorptive capacity" refers to an organization's ability to assimilate and replicate new knowledge gained from external sources. A substantial body of research demonstrates that absorptive capacity contributes directly and indirectly to company performance. See W.M. Cohen and D.A. Levinthal, "Absorptive Capacity: A New Perspective on Learning and Innovation," Administrative Science Quarterly 35, no. 1 (March 1990): 128-152.