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The Impact of Training on Organizational Performance: A Study of Hotel Sector in Terengganu, Malaysia.

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Abstract

This research aims to test the relationship between training and organizational performance from a new perspective. The study was conducted for the hotel sector in Malaysia by using a sample of 110 respondents made up of selected managerial level employees in hotels in Kuala Terengganu. The convenient sampling technique was used and the analysis was done using the SPSS software. Four hypotheses have been developed to test the impact of the independent variables on overall organizational performance. A significant finding emerged whereby a positive relationship exists between training and organizational performance. This indicates that training sessions are working smooth in the services sector as they enhance organizational performance. As a result, the hypotheses are in favour of significant relationship with organizational performance. The research findings are in support of training, requiring the human resource department to improve the quality of trainings that are provided to hotel staff. This initiative is able to increase employees’ commitment to tasks, consequently boosting organizational performance.

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... Cohen & Hill, [5] emphasize that in-service training helps teachers acquire more conceptual and technical knowledge, skills and competencies in their teaching subjects and pedagogy in order to improve their efficiency in the classroom. Tan, [6] goes on to expound that in-service training is the process and activities designed to enhance the professional content subject matter, knowledge, skills and attitudes of teachers so as to improve the learning outcome of learners. ...
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It is widely recognised that one of the greatest economic problems facing developed countries is unemployment. An example of this recognition is the recent reports by the OECD ("The OECD Jobs Study", 1994) on unemployment, its causes and possible policies. One issue that is closely associated with unemployment in many people's minds is competitiveness and associated with that is the use of new technology. Indeed, the OECD Jobs Study plots out the relative importance of 'high-tech' manufacturing in each member country. This paper aims to contribute to the debate on this issue by examining the impact of the introduction of new technology on employment growth and profitability. We use two complementary datasets: two large representative cross-sections of establishments in Britain in 1990 and Australia in 1989/90. We investigate the effect of innovation in each country and then compare the outcome.
Employees Training and Organizational Performance: Mediation by Employees Performance
Azara Shaheen, Syed Mubasher Hussain Naqvi and Muhammad Atif Khan (2013). Employees Training and Organizational Performance: Mediation by Employees Performance. Interdisciplinary Journal Of Contemporary Research In Business, 5(4), 490-503.