The Power of Creative Advertising and Consumers’ Perceived Risk

ArticleinJournal of Promotion Management 20(5):590-606 · October 2014with 232 Reads 
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Abstract
Despite the growing importance of creative advertising as an effective marketing tool, little is known about the process through which it influences preexisting attitudes for familiar brands and factors that moderate its effectiveness. To fill this gap, A 2 advertising type (creative vs. normal) by 2 product category (high risk vs. low risk) experiment was conducted. Four creative ads and four normal ads were developed for some familiar brands and were exhibited for participants. Results indicate that creative ads significantly lead to more favorable ad credibility, ad attitude, brand attitude, and purchase intention than normal ads. Perceived product risk was found to moderate the effectiveness of creative ads.

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  • ... Notably, earlier research on advertising creativity has either looked into the effectiveness of creative ads (Marthak, 2013;Shirkhodaee & Rezaee, 2014, Till & Baack, 2005 or mere conceptualization of advertising creativity (Ang, Leong & Lee, 2007). For instance, Kover, Goldberg and James (1995) found that creative advertisements are more liked and recallable. ...
  • ... Creativity plays an important role in many aspects of our lives: it is essential in education, arts, science (Fink et al., 2010), and of course in the design and development of creative advertising campaigns (Sasser and Koslow, 2008;Baack et al., 2016). Advertising practitioners consider creativity as an effective solution of breaking through the advertising clutter in a competitive media marketplace (e.g., Ang et al., 2007;Smith et al., 2008;Shirkhodaee and Rezaee, 2014) and it is typical for introductory texts to dedicate a substantial section to the role of creativity in advertising (e.g., Smith and Yang, 2004). It is of theoretical and practical importance to research creativity in advertising. ...
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