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Organizational socialization: The effective onboarding of new employees

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... A growing body of research indicates that poor understanding of the work environment, culture and practices of each specialty within the short-period of block internship rotation limits students' opportunities for meaningful interaction with members of the community of practice (6,10,11). Students' participation and involvement in each clinical environment depends on these knowledgeable members (10,(12)(13)(14)(15). Without these interactions, the likelihood of students to exhibit high levels of anxiety, feelings of marginalization, perceived stress and overall lack of readiness for practice increases (1,6,(16)(17)(18)(19). ...
... By transferring some of the interactive experiences gained during simulation activity, medical students will have imperative experiences transitioning into the EM workplace during their internship rotation. This could be considered as the hallmark of the professional socialization process, an essential part of adjusting into a new work culture and environment (12,13,27). ...
... Professional socialization is a "continuous, interactive and transformative" process that takes place when an individual (i.e., novice or newcomer) adopts the culture of their respective profession (27). The organizational socialization theory, conceptualized and modified by Bauer and Erdogan (12), captures the essence of this definition. The theory highlights three factors that are essential to newcomers' socialization process; new employee's characteristics, new employee's behavior and organizational efforts (12). ...
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Background Medical students in block clerkships constantly adapt to new environments and learn to interact with new people as they rotate between specialties. This frequent change potentially limited interns' opportunities for participation in real clinical practice. The aims of this study were to explore interns' conceptualization of their learning opportunities and experiences in the workplace during an emergency medicine (EM) block internship. In addition, the study also explored how participating in the pre-rotation high-fidelity simulation (HFS) orientation influenced interns' perception of their transition, participation and learning experiences in the real EM setting. Methods We implemented a newly developed pre-EM rotation orientation curriculum for interns. This orientation took place on the first day of the 2-week EM internship rotation. Two focus group discussions were held after each simulation training, one immediately after simulation to understand the students' perception and the educational impact of this activity, the other at the end of EM rotation to explore and compare their roles and perception in both simulation activity and the real clinical practice. A total of 151 seventh-year medical students enrolled in the pre-course HFS and post-hoc focus group discussions between 2017 and 2019. We applied thematic analysis to systemically identify, examine, and construct themes. Results Four major themes were constructed from the data; 1. Challenges in finding authentic learning experiences within the context of emergency medicine; 2. Effectiveness of the pre-course HFS 3. Limitations of EM internship rotation curriculum and pre-course simulation. 4. Suggestions for EM block-internship curriculum reforms. Our study's key findings indicate that pre-rotation orientation HFS activity, which offered a psychologically safe space for students to explore facets of EM and gain a contextualized understanding of the emergency work culture and environment, was essential for enhancing students' ability to identify and maximize practice affordances in real workplace. Conclusion Simulation, facilitates interns' negotiation of legitimate peripheral participation opportunities as they transition into the EM community of practice during their block internship rotation; putting students at the center of the learning process.
... Teacher occupational socialization refers to the process by which teachers enter the school environment, develop their perspectives about the school culture, environment, and interactions with fellow teachers, and adapt to the school by internalizing various knowledge, behaviors, norms, values, and beliefs [7,8]. Studies on teacher occupational socialization in physical education have generally analyzed workplace socialization or the "adaptation process to become a teacher", focusing on how to learn the knowledge, skills, and attitudes necessary to become an effective member of this profession [9]. Occupational socialization is the main topic of socialization after adulthood, and studies on occupational socialization have been reported in various occupational groups [10][11][12]. ...
... Regarding this process, Richards and Templin [21] emphasized the importance of the beginning-teacher period for physical education teachers, presenting a support program that promotes occupational socialization for beginning physical education teachers at the national level. Considering the importance of analyses on how to learn the knowledge, skills, and attitudes necessary to become an effective member of a specific profession, efforts are being made to approach the occupational socialization of beginning physical education teachers from multiple perspectives [9]. For example, Choi [3] conducted a case study on the adaptation process of beginning physical education teachers in middle schools and Kim et al. [22] explored how to adapt to or overcome the conflict between teaching and experience that is perceived by these physical education teachers at the beginning of their careers, again within the context of middle schools. ...
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This study aimed to explore the factor structure of the Korean version of the occupational socialization of beginning physical education teachers scale, in the context of the COVID-19 pandemic, and to verify its relationship with health perception education. In October 2021, 257 Korean beginning physical education teachers were enrolled in this study. Data were analyzed using frequency analysis, exploratory factor analysis, confirmatory factor analysis, descriptive statistics, reliability analysis, and multiple regression analysis. Regarding the findings, first, the occupational socialization of beginning physical education teachers scale showed a six-factor structure: role recognition, past physical education class experience, pre-service teacher education, organizational atmosphere, fellow physical education teachers, and sports facility. Second, occupational socialization of beginning physical education teachers showed a partial positive effect on health perception education. These results suggest that the Korean Metropolitan and Provincial Offices of Education and Korean schools should develop various methods to support and ensure the occupational socialization of beginning physical education teachers. Such efforts may enable these new professionals to effectively adapt to their schools, teaching roles, and provide effective health education to students under the difficult context of the COVID-19 pandemic, wherein normal educational activities are hindered.
... Familiarisation with the new environment is vital in smooth transitioning from an old building to a new facility. Good onboarding leads to early adoption and acceptance of new changes [8]. New building transition also brings about changes in the business process [9]. ...
... In this case study, we borrow the organizational psychology term "onboarding" (e.g., Bauer & Erdogan, 2011) to describe instructional efforts that support learner integration into unfamiliar geographic, social, and/or cultural contexts as they begin a course of study. This positions onboarding as an early intervention in the longer-term project of supporting undergraduate performance and persistence (Kerby, 2015;Tinto, 1975). ...
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Many introductory students face challenges adjusting to new geographic, social, and cultural contexts involved in their course of study, yet the extent of a student's integration and "sense of place" in an academic environment is associated with their performance and persistence toward related goals. This case study describes a place-based blended learning activity we created in ArcGIS StoryMaps (https://storymaps.arcgis. com/) to acclimatize students to the novel environment of an introductory animal sciences course during the first week of the semester. Using an embedded mixed-method design, this activity combines two complementary sources of data: 1) a qualitative personal account of activity design and implementation during the fall 2020 and fall 2021 semesters, and 2) an embedded quantitative survey of student learning outcomes and perceptions of the activity in the fall 2021 semester. Qualitative results illustrated instructional design choices related to the course context and instructional constraints and illuminated potential modifications to the activity's collaborative and assessment elements. Quantitative results on a 5-pt. anchored scale suggested that the activity was very effective at orienting students to the course's geographic context (M = 4.0, SD = 0.9), moderately effective at facilitating social bonding (M = 3.5, SD = 1.1), and moderately effective at increasing historical-cultural awareness related to the department (M = 3.2, SD = 1.3). Our results indicated that blended, place-based learning served as an effective onboarding activity in the context of our course.
... From a social learning perspective, newcomers are often particularly enthusiastic about learning and assimilating to the organizational context (Ostroff & Kozlowski, 1992). They also face a significant degree of uncertainty and are motivated to improve their performance quickly (Bauer & Erdogan, 2011;Wright & Bonett, 2002), accumulating skills that can be useful on the job (Judge et al., 1995). Even though, this process does not improve performance immediately, investing sufficient time in training and socialization may increase newcomers' job performance, allowing them to have role clarity and competence (Jackson & Schuler, 1985). ...
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Research in HR has devoted little attention to the practice of scheduling shift workers into times and places to conduct their work. Relying upon the growing literature related to relational HR, we propose a relational view of scheduling that focuses on how employees' social contexts—particularly their being co‐scheduled with higher performers—relate to changes in performance over time. We apply resource dependence and social learning theories to describe how employees' performance over time depends upon their working alongside higher performers. Higher performers consume limited resources (thereby constraining peers' performance in the short term), yet also provide instructive role models for learning new skills (thereby elevating peers' performance over the longer term). We further hypothesize these effects are stronger for employees who are newer to the firm in contrast to those with more experience. We analyze scheduling and performance data from 7,893 retail sales representatives over a 1‐year period. Results show co‐scheduling with higher performers has an immediate negative effect on employee performance, but is positively related to employee performance over time. Unexpectedly, co‐scheduling effects were present for all employees and not only for those new to the organization. Our study points to the need for HR research on employee scheduling to better understand how shift workers' schedules provide the relational context for their work. The research offers several theoretical contributions in understanding the peer effects of higher performers, and we offer practical implications for managers seeking to design employees' schedules to encourage organizationally advantageous relationships between coworkers.
... The process comes with a multitude of requirements that have already been strongly associated with the intention to remain in institutions or companies [6]. The onboarding process involves deliberate interactions between the newcomer and the institution within which the newcomer needs to be integrated [7]. Onboarding interventions are used to support this interplay in multiple ways. ...
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Every year, students around the globe embark upon their higher education journey, making the onboarding of these students a critical task for colleges and universities. Combined with the growth in distance learning and the rapid development in technologies, the onboarding process occurs increasingly in the digital setting. For this reason, the objective of this scoping review was to report and map interventions, which are used in digital onboarding of first-year students in higher education institutions and explore the digital settings that characterized these interventions. The PRISMA-ScR Guidelines and the JBI Manual for Evidence Synthesis guided this investigation, which included researching four databases and screening the resulting titles and abstracts to identify the 17 sources of evidence included in the final analysis. According to our results, digital and virtual onboarding interventions were categorized into four onboarding dimensions: information interventions, socialization interventions, counseling interventions, and self-study interventions. Examples of the purposes and outcomes of these onboarding interventions included the transfer of information and the socialization of incoming students. Of the five onboarding settings that were also identified in the categorization, telecommunication software and virtual environments predominated. An independently developed onboarding tool could combine the identified onboarding settings and dimensions in the future.
... Note 1. A process through which new organizational members move from being an outsider to an insider and learn the knowledge, skills, and behaviors necessary to succeed in the organization (Bauer & Erdogan, 2011). ...
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