Article

The People's Almanac

Authors:
To read the full-text of this research, you can request a copy directly from the authors.

No full-text available

Request Full-text Paper PDF

To read the full-text of this research,
you can request a copy directly from the authors.

... The stimulus text was a story about the kidnapping of Charles Lindbergh's baby (Wallechinsky & Wallace , 1978). In addition, the Nelson-Denny (Brown, Nelson, & Denny, 1973) vocabulary test (I<Xl-item, multiple choice) was used in a distractor task . ...
Article
Full-text available
College subjects read and recalled one of two versions of the same text. One version of the text contained signals to both the general organization of the text and to the organization of specific sentences in the text; the alternate version did not contain organizational signals. Overall recall was better for the text with signals than for the text without signals because recall of specifically signaled information was aided by signaling. The magnitude of the signaling effect was related to subjects’ text recall abilities: Signaling effects were larger for better recallers than for poorer recallers.
... Beyond that, we can nd a direct causal relationship between educational spending and economic growth. We have constructed Figure 1 (see also Table 1 at the end) from OECD data (OECD, 1981;OECD, 1995a;1977 population data are from Wallechinsky and Wallace, 1978). This demonstrates high correlations between total public expenditure on Countries are ranked by educational spending. ...
Article
Full-text available
Policy on higher education in Australia has become highly political since the massive expansion which occurred under the prime ministership of Bob Hawke in the 1980's. We believe that many of the changes which have been imposed upon the higher education sector during the Dawkins period and thereafter have been driven by ideological concerns rather than any careful considerations of the role of education in society and the best forms of support and delivery of education. Here we present a variety of considerations and facts relevant to assessing the role of higher education in Australian society, the form of delivery of education, the management of that delivery and the extent to which education should be supported by public nances. The main points we make are: It has become widely acknowledged outside Australia that public educational spending is a crucial determiner of future economic well-being. We directly support this view with an analysis of OECD data.
Article
Full-text available
Two projects of the Linear City, which appeared at the beginning of the 20th century, in the United States, regardless of the project implemented earlier in Spain by Arturo Soria, are described. The technical and town-planning features of the Roadtown project by Edgar Chembless and the social ideas underlying it are given. The reasons for the failure of this project, as well as similar projects that appeared later, are analyzed. The history of the project of Milo Hastings and his idea of a linear concentration of dwellings in the city are given. Although this project was also not implemented, the reasons why its town-planning ideas found application in the post-war construction of the American suburb and social ideas in the New Deal of President Franklin Roosevelt are shown.
Article
The commemoration of the Columbian quincentenary played an important role in stimulating new research on the biological effects of the arrival of Europeans on Native American groups throughout the New World. Although these discussions have involved many disciplines, physical anthropology has been underrepresented until recently. This article reviews a range of studies on the biological impact of European colonization of the Americas on native populations. Historical sources, mission and civil records, archaeological information, and human skeletal remains have provided a fund of data that are being used to document and interpret native health and well-being after 1492. Osteological investigations reveal that before contact, native populations were not living in a pristine, disease-free environment. Moreover, prehistoric populations experienced occasional eruptions of social conflict and violence, patterns of which are similar to what has been documented in contemporary small-scale societies. Archaeological, historical, and bioarchaeological studies provide compelling evidence that the arrival of Europeans did not occasion a sudden pandemic of smallpox in the early sixteenth century. Rather, epidemic disease in the contact era was a patchwork affair, striking some populations and not others at various times. Regionally based bioarchaeological investigations have disclosed new details about the contact period in the Americas and elsewhere (e.g., Polynesia), particularly in regard to variability in physiological stress, health status, diet and nutritional quality, and activity patterns. These studies show that although rapid population loss and extinction occurred in some areas, many groups survived and accommodated new and challenging circumstances. These findings also indicate that there are common elements to native response to contact with Europeans, but population and regional changes were shaped by localized factors. The demographic resurgence and population recovery during the twentieth century illustrates that Native Americans are a vital part of today's human biological landscape in the western hemisphere. © 1994 Wiley-Liss, Inc.
ResearchGate has not been able to resolve any references for this publication.