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Practitioners' Perception of Landscape Education in Universities

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Abstract

This study investigates the practitioners` perception of Landscape Education in the universities in order to satisfy the demands of the rapidly changing industry. The survey was conducted for 257 practitioners to analyze the overall perception of Landscape Education, the importance and utilization of each course in universities, and the importance and utilization of each landscape process step. The overall perception of Landscape Education was slightly negative, and more practical education was demanded to improve the students` adaptability on the job. Practitioners suggested that universities should teach more practical expertise and related fields. They re-educated deficient aspects such as practical skills, computer techniques and legislational knowledge through the new employee training. The survey also showed that professors should be most responsible for a better education; however, students and practitioners have to endeavor together. According to the findings, planting design, landscape design, landscape materials, landscape planning and landscape construction as well as management were important. They are also considered as practical courses. However, practitioners perceived that university education was not sufficient for the constructional process. This means that Landscape Education in the universities has been more focused on planning and design. Because the universities are essentially for the research and study, changing the curriculum as practitioners suggested is not necessary. Nevertheless, it suggests for more practical education and balanced curriculum including construction and management that should be seriously considered. This study was focused on the practitioners` perception. Many of the respondents were from Seoul metropolitan area, therefore, it`s hard to generalize the findings. A further study should be considered that would include instructors as well as students.

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