Article

More Than a “VCR for Radio”: The CBC, the Radio 3 Podcast, and the Uses of an Emerging Medium

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Abstract

The Canadian Broadcasting Corporation's (CBC) approach to podcasting has typically involved the re-presentation of radio programs that effectively extend and promote the broader CBC Radio service. The lone exception to this is the CBC Radio 3 Podcast. This article details the CBC's history with podcasts in order to argue that, up to this point, the format has frequently extended, rather than disrupted, established broadcasting forms and institutions.

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... Previous studies on podcasts primarily examine the history and uses of the media, as well as its impact on radio (Berry, 2016;Bottomley, 2015;Cwynar, 2015;Lindgren, 2016;Markman, 2015;McHugh, 2016;Mou & Lin, 2015;Wrather, 2016). True crime scholars have examined the genre's effects on the audience, the audience itself, the relationship of the genre to actual crime statistics, the likelihood of accurate portrayal within the genre, and even developed an infotainment measure specifically for the true crime genre (Russell, 1995;Surette & Otto, 2002;Vicary & Fraley, 2010). ...
... In 2015, the Broadcast Education Association published a special symposium in the Journal of Radio & Audio Media examining "A decade in the life of a 'new' audio medium" with a comprehensive look at podcasting. Contributors examined the history of podcasting (Bottomley, 2015), the future of podcasting (Markman, 2015), how podcasts compare to radio (Cwynar, 2015), and the impact of two specific podcasts, Serial and Welcome to Night Vale (Berry, 2015;Bottomley, 2015). Additional podcast research has examined audience adoption, online engagement and the narrative, and story-telling abilities of the medium (Lindgren, 2016;Mou & Lin, 2015;Wrather, 2016). ...
Article
This study explores the true crime podcast audience within the uses and gratifications theoretical frame. Using an online survey (n = 308), this study found that the true crime podcast audience is predominantly female (73%), and 3 motivations were prominent for users: entertainment, convenience, and boredom. Additionally, three motivating factors were found to be significantly more salient for females than for males: social interaction, escape, and voyeurism. Practical and theoretical implications for genre-specific media are discussed.
... On one side, Lacey (2008; emphasizes continuity with radio and Bottomley argues that 'there is little about podcasting that is truly new, when the full range of radio's history and forms are taken into account ' (2015, p. 180). Cwynar (2015) claims that podcasting has frequently extended, rather than disrupted, established broadcasting forms and institutions. ...
Preprint
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Arguments over the status of podcasting have engaged both radio studies and emerging podcasting studies in recent years without resolution. Radio scholars find in podcasting a remediation of radio, while those who approach podcasting from other disciplines or from digital media studies tend to emphasize the disruptive aspects of podcasting as a new medium. These two different positions are difficult to reconcile, but, what if they were both true? In this chapter, I propose a way out of this debate, a third way which draws upon the cultural history of broadcasting, the political economy of communication, Social shaping of Technology, Social Construction of Technology studies (SCOT), Actor-Network Theory (ANT) and Cultural Studies to explore the very nature of podcasting as a medium. Comparing the early years of broadcasting with the early stage of podcasting, I will try to show that podcasting has re-mediated some aspects of radio, but it also represents something completely different. Citation: Bonini, T. (2022) Podcasting as a hybrid cultural form between old and new media. In M. Lindgren and J. Loviglio, Routledge Companion to Radio and Podcast Studies (pp. 19-29), London: Routledge.
... Studies on podcasts relevant to this research have focused on motivations in the true crime podcast audience according to uses and gratifications theory (Boling & Hull, 2018), new genre conventions developed in the medium according to industry insiders (McHugh, 2016), and podcasting's distinct turn toward highly personal and intimate narrative journalistic content (Lindgren, 2016). In addition to studies on the establishment of podcasting's uses, evolution, and intersection with radio (Berry, 2015(Berry, , 2016Cwynar, 2015;Markham, 2015;Mou & Lin, 2015;Wrather, 2016) are approaches to longform audio journalism via genre (McHugh, 2014) and convergence (Panda, 2014). ...
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Structural shifts behind the rise of podcasting have led to programming aimed at sustaining audience attention, a development coinciding with the sharp increase in engaged time with digital longform content among mobile users. This study industrially and culturally situates 3 case studies: True Murder (a pioneering precursor to This American Life producers’ Serial), S-Town (Serial’s successor that far exceeded its listenership), and Ear Hustle (Radiotopia’s experiment in subject-produced content made by two inmates at San Quentin State Prison). Each case illustrates how distinct sectors of the podcasting industry approach the production of absorbing nonfiction through transparent journalism featuring self-reflexive metanarrative.
... In 2015, the Broadcast Education Association published a special symposium in the Journal of Radio and Audio Media examining podcasting comprehensively. Contributors examined the history of podcasting (Bottomley 2015), how podcasts compare to radio (Cwynar 2015), the future of podcasting (Markman 2015), and the impact of two specific podcasts, Serial and Welcome to Night Vale (2012) (Berry 2015;Bottomley 2015). In 2016, The Radio Journal: International Studies in Broadcast and Audio Media also featured a special section on podcasting which explored personal narrative journalism (Lindgren 2016), podcasts association with the word radio (Berry 2016), the impact of podcasting on storytelling (McHugh 2016), and listener participation online (Wrather 2016). ...
Article
This study examines true crime podcasts with a critical/cultural lens to explore how podcasts are impacting the true crime genre, public opinion and the criminal justice system. Four in-depth qualitative interviews with true crime podcast producers offer insight into both the political economy of podcasts and effective audience engagement. Ultimately, this study argues that true crime podcasts are impacting the criminal justice system in unprecedented ways and that the future of this emerging media could challenge both criminal justice and media reform. Practical implications for genre-specific media are also discussed.
... Se le resalta por su carácter disruptivo y por su potencial dentro de una cultura cada vez más participativa. Incluso se llegó a hacer un paralelismo auditivo entre el podcast como el blogging (Cwynar, 2015). "El uso de podcasts está ganando más fuerza al igual que el formato en sí mismo se está volviendo menos experimental, más profesional y más similar a la radio" (Cwynar, 2015, p.191). ...
Thesis
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Vivimos en un mundo cada vez más consolidado digitalmente, en el que los medios de comunicación buscan adaptar las herramientas que han traído estas nuevas tecnologías. En este contexto, esta tesis capturó un momento de la evolución de un medio digital cuya matriz es una radio reconocida por los peruanos: RPP Noticias. El estudio analizó el nivel de innovación del lenguaje digital en su edición web. Esta tesis tiene como objetivos: identificar sus elementos multimedia, analizar sus tipos de herramientas interactivas, detallar sus características de hipertextualidad, examinar el uso de las herramientas de web analytics y detallar los nuevos perfiles de periodistas digitales en su sala de redacción. Para ello, se realizó el estudio de una muestra de 180 notas, seleccionadas bajo la estrategia metodológica de la ‘semana construida’ y correspondientes a dos periodos de análisis (2016 y 2019). Además, se realizaron entrevistas a redactores y editores. La evidencia muestra que el uso del lenguaje digital tuvo avances moderados y en sus nociones más básicas. Asimismo, la audiencia es tomada en cuenta por parte de editores y redactores, a través del uso de las herramientas de analítica web. Sin embargo, ambos actores hacen un balance constante entre su propio criterio y las preferencias de los usuarios.
... In the early years of podcasting on the BBC (UK), NPR (US) and ABC (Australia), podcasting was seen as an extension of traditional broadcasting, but media-specific content was also being produced (Berry, 2006, p. 150). Cwynar (2015) demonstrates the idea that podcasting can be considered an extension of the radio through the Canadian Broadcasting Corporation's podcast applications. The Canadian Broadcasting Corporation's podcasting approach is to expand and make CBC's radio services more efficient. ...
Chapter
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This study deals with the concept of podcast broadcasting being a complementary application that brings new, useful features to radio broadcasting rather than adopting the idea of a new form of radio. In this context, according to radio listening research of RIAK in Turkey, NTV Radyo, Kral FM, Best FM, Power Türk Radyo, and TRT FM were selected as the most listened-to radio stations considering their categories. The general live broadcast contents and podcasts of these radio stations were subjected to descriptive analysis to determine their differences and similarities. The result of the study revealed that the related radio stations consider podcast broadcasting as an extension of traditional broadcasting.
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Working at the intersection of migration studies and radio studies, we interrogate podcasting’s potential as a practice-based activist research method. This article documents podcasting’s role in an ethnographic project conducted together with Konstkupan (The Art Hive), a migrant-focused community arts space in Malmö, Sweden. We argue that the value of podcasting as a practice-based research method exists in its potential to function as a boundary object. Boundary objects are technologies and processes bridging social worlds and providing sites of communication and translation between groups. Challenging narratives that detect a decline in podcasting’s radical potential, we argue that as a boundary object, podcasting’s political significance continues in how it convenes small, diverse, but attentive ‘listening publics’. A boundary object does not demand consensus on the meanings or representations it produces, affording space for both the synchrony and dissonance of narratives produced by migrants.
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