Article

Utilization of edible coating in extending the shelf life of minimally processed prickly pear

Authors:
To read the full-text of this research, you can request a copy directly from the authors.

No full-text available

Request Full-text Paper PDF

To read the full-text of this research,
you can request a copy directly from the authors.

... Tomatoes, grapes, and cantaloupe firmness was maintained by the application of aloe vera-based edible coating during the storage period with the maintenance of other quality attributes such as color, acidity, sugar content, cracking of the fruits, antimicrobial, antifungal, and antioxidant activity [144][145][146]. Other researchers have also retained the higher textural properties of the strawberry fruits [43], mango [152], tomato [155,176,180], guava [158,169], fresh-cut melon [159], baby carrot [160], apricot [187], cherry fruits [164], fresh-cut apple [166,168], pineapple [167], fresh-cut pears [170], banana [172], litchi [174], and bell-pepper [175] using edible coating prepared using natural gum such as pigeon pea gum, gum arabic, almond gum, xanthan gum, guar gum, gellan gum, cashew gum, chitosan, pullulan and peach gum, respectively, with maintaining other quality and extension of postharvest shelf life. ...
... On other hand, Rojas-Graü et al. [168] reported that the gellangum-based edible coating combined with sun flower oil not showed any significance on the respiration rate of fresh-cut Fuji apples during the storage period. Guar and xanthan gum was used for minimally process on the pear to extending their shelf life by 9 days by maintaining quality attributes, sensorial property, minimized oxidation, respiration rate [170]. Almond gum and gum arabic were reported as novel edible materials by Mahfoudhi and Hamdi [41] to maintain the postharvest quality attributes of sweet cherry by reducing the respiration rate. ...
... The probable reduction in TSS content might be due to the minimal processing that when injuring the fruit promoted greater sugar degradation i.e. being used as a substrate in the respiratory metabolism since the transpiration rate was higher in minimally processed and vacuum-packed pumpkins at the end of 12 th day of storage at 10 0 C (Silva et al., 2009) [20] . The results of present finding are in accordance with findings reported by Zhang et al. (2004) [26] in cucumber, Viana (2009) [23] in fresh cut pineapple, Mohamed et al. (2013) [14] in minimally processed prickly pear and Lima et al. ...
... Lima et al. (2019) [12] also stated that the untreated control recorded the maximum total microbial count during storage. The results of present findings are in close conformity with the results reported by Pizato et al. (2013) [16] in minimally processed peaches, Mohamed et al. (2013) [14] in prickly pear and Yurdugul (2016) [25] in peeled banana. From the present study, it is concluded that fresh cut red pumpkin pre-treated with xanthan gum @ 0.50% i.e. ...
Article
Full-text available
Aim: The main aim of present investigation was to study the effect of different edible coatings on physico-chemical composition and sensorial qualities of fresh cut red pumpkin under various storage conditions. Methodology: The present study was laid out in completely randomized design with dipping treatments of edible coatings such as T1 = Untreated control, T2 = Xanthan gum 0.50%, T3 = Chitosan 1%, T4 = Gaur gum 0.25%, T5 = Ascorbic acid 0.50%, T6 = Glycerol 1% and T7 = Sodium benzoate 0.05% with three replications. The pre-treated samples of fresh cut red pumpkin of cv. Arka Chandan were packed in polyethylene bags of 200 gauge with 2% vents and stored at ambient temperature (AT) and refrigerator storage (RS) i.e. 5 ± 1 0 C and 90% RH. The observations on physico-chemical composition, sensorial qualities and total microbial count were recorded as per the standard analytical procedures. Results: The data revealed that, the lowest PLW, acidity, total microbial count were recorded in T2 (2.50%, 91.27%, 0.58%, 7.47 log cfu/g, followed by T3 (2.87%, 0.65%, 5.72, 8.26 log cfu/g, respectively) while the maximum retention of TSS, firmness, ascorbic acid and total minerals and score for colour, flavour, taste, appearance, overall acceptability (6.07 Brix, 3.88 kg/cm 2 , 8.58 mg/100g, 417.02 mg/100g, 8.00, 8.04, 8.25, 8.26, 8.16, respectively) followed by T3 (5.91 ̊ Brix, 3.73 kg/cm 2 , 8.47 mg/100g, 416.73 mg/100g, 7.83, 7.94, 8.14, 8.16, 8.03, respectively) of fresh cut red pumpkin on 12 th day of storage at refrigerator storage. Interpretation: The dipping treatment of xanthan gum @0.50% (T2) and chitosan @1% (T3) were found effective for better retention of physico-chemical composition, sensorial qualities and reduced total microbial count of fresh cut red pumpkin up to twelve days at refrigerator storage.
... Tomatoes, grapes, and cantaloupe firmness was maintained by the application of aloe vera-based edible coating during the storage period with the maintenance of other quality attributes such as color, acidity, sugar content, cracking of the fruits, antimicrobial, antifungal, and antioxidant activity [144][145][146]. Other researchers have also retained the higher textural properties of the strawberry fruits [43], mango [152], tomato [155,176,180], guava [158,169], fresh-cut melon [159], baby carrot [160], apricot [187], cherry fruits [164], fresh-cut apple [166,168], pineapple [167], fresh-cut pears [170], banana [172], litchi [174], and bell-pepper [175] using edible coating prepared using natural gum such as pigeon pea gum, gum arabic, almond gum, xanthan gum, guar gum, gellan gum, cashew gum, chitosan, pullulan and peach gum, respectively, with maintaining other quality and extension of postharvest shelf life. ...
... On other hand, Rojas-Graü et al. [168] reported that the gellangum-based edible coating combined with sun flower oil not showed any significance on the respiration rate of fresh-cut Fuji apples during the storage period. Guar and xanthan gum was used for minimally process on the pear to extending their shelf life by 9 days by maintaining quality attributes, sensorial property, minimized oxidation, respiration rate [170]. Almond gum and gum arabic were reported as novel edible materials by Mahfoudhi and Hamdi [41] to maintain the postharvest quality attributes of sweet cherry by reducing the respiration rate. ...
Chapter
Recently, natural gum is promising as a novel source for maintaining the postharvest quality, organoleptic properties, and extending the shelf life of fruits and vegetables during the storage period. The development of natural gum-based edible coating has increased remarkable growth in the past few decades. The use of natural gum to develop edible coating helps to improve the recyclability of packaging materials compared to synthetic packaging materials. It is also a good alternative to synthetic packaging and played an important role as a biodegradable and eco-friendly edible coating for improving postharvest characteristics and shelf life of fruits and vegetables. They are naturally occurring carbohydrate/polysaccharide-based polymers obtained from natural/renewable sources. The natural gums are hydrocolloid in nature and used as a water binder and also act as a good carrier of natural antioxidant and antimicrobial agents. The present chapter reviewed the potential applications of different types of natural gums as novel film-forming materials/edible coating on postharvest characteristics and shelf life of fruits and vegetables. The chapter also summarized the extensive knowledge about the natural gums, their effectiveness, protection, and suitability on fruits and vegetables.
... The main characteristic feature of edible coating is to increase shelf life of fresh or processed fruits and vegetables and it is protected from postharvest damages and environmental damages. An edible coating protects outer membrane of fresh fruits and vegetables (Mohamed et al., 2013) [33] . The edible coatings are served as carrier of texture enhancer, antioxidants and it is used as a nutraceutical. ...
... The main characteristic feature of edible coating is to increase shelf life of fresh or processed fruits and vegetables and it is protected from postharvest damages and environmental damages. An edible coating protects outer membrane of fresh fruits and vegetables (Mohamed et al., 2013) [33] . The edible coatings are served as carrier of texture enhancer, antioxidants and it is used as a nutraceutical. ...
Article
Full-text available
Nowadays, fruits and vegetables are highly demanded in the market because of their nutritional value. Due to their perishable nature, fruits and vegetables have a short shelf life. About 30% of fruits and vegetables are affected or damaged by insects, microorganisms, pre, and post-harvesting conditions during transport and preservation. Preservation of fruits and vegetables is a big challenge for the world. The edible coating is an effective method to solve this problem. It provides protective edible covering to fruits and vegetables. It is beneficial for consumers and the environment. Today herbal edible coatings are used as a nutraceutical and beneficial for consumer health. Edible coatings are of different types such as hydrocolloids, lipids, and plasticizers. These have good barrier properties to O2, CO2, moisture, and water vapor.
... • Several active ingredients such as anti-browning agents, dyes, aromas, nutrients and spices can be incorporated into the polymer matrix and consumed with the fruit, thus increasing safety and even nutritional and sensory properties. • They help to reduce synthetic packaging waste due to their biodegradable nature [2,13,[17][18][19]. ...
Article
Full-text available
There has been a significant increase in the development of edible films and coatings in recent times, and this is expected to have a significant impact on the quality of fruit and vegetables in the coming years. Consumers expect fresh fruit and vegetables free from pesticide residues, with high quality, nutritional value and an extended shelf life. The application of coatings and edible films to fruits and vegetables represents an environmentally friendly approach to an innovative solution to this problem. Coatings and edible films can act as ecological and biodegradable packaging. The coating strategy involves a combination of natural biopolymers and appropriate preservation methods. The article presents the applicability, trends and perspectives of polysaccharide coatings and edible films and their impact on the quality of fruit and vegetables, providing an understanding of their main functions and benefits. Numerous studies show that natural polysaccharides are well suited for use as packaging material for fresh fruit and vegetables and can often be an important alternative to synthetic compounds. Natural polymer materials are a good barrier to oxygen and carbon dioxide; however, they are characterised by excessive solubility in the water environment, water vapour permeability and low extensibility. The properties of edible coatings can be modified by the addition of plasticisers, surfactants, cross-linkers, antimicrobial agents, functional additives, nanosilver particles or fruit and vegetable residues. The use of an electric field is also a promising technology here. The use of polysaccharides for the preparation of edible films and coatings is justified not only by the possibility of reducing the consumption of packaging made of synthetic polymer materials but also by the fact that the production of some natural polymers can be made using waste products generated during the processing of food raw materials.
... The increment of total soluble solids at the time of storage period is natural as sugar the basic constituent of the TSS is used in respiration process for metabolic activities of the fresh fruits and vegetables (Ozden and Bayindirli, 2002). Mohamed et al. (2013) reported a non significant difference in total soluble solids percent loses due to coating with guar or xanthan as compared to control. During storage the increment in TSS might be associated with the transformation of pectic substances and starch hydrolysis and also with dehydration of fruits (Goncalves et al., 2000;Park, 2002). ...
Article
Full-text available
The present research was conducted to extend the shelf life of fresh pears by using beeswax and cornstarch herbal edible coatings. The coatings were prepared from cornstarch and beeswax by incorporation of aqueous Tulsi (Ocimum sanctum) extract. Cornstarch and beeswax have good moisture and gas barrier properties while Tulsi (O. sanctum) extract acted as an antimicrobial agent in this coating therefore herbal edible coated fruits have a longer shelf life as compared to uncoated fruits. Coated and uncoated fruits were stored at ambient temperature (31 ± 2 °C and 70 ± 8% RH) and low temperature (4 °C). Pears were analyzed for the quality parameters such as weight loss, firmness, TSS, titratable acidity, pH and sensory evaluation. The weight loss and firmness of coated fruits were less as compared to uncoated fruits. Beeswax herbal edible coating gave the best results in pear storage as compared to cornstarch herbal edible coating. On the other hand Cornstarch herbal edible coating also gave good results as compared to uncoated fruits, it enhanced the shelf life of pears for 45 days at ambient temperature and 60 days at low temperature (4 °C), in case of beeswax herbal edible coating it increased the storage life of pears for 45 days at ambient temperature and 70 days at low temperature (4°C). Sensory evaluation of coated fruits such as color, texture, overall acceptability was better for both conditions as compared to uncoated. Therefore, it is concluded that the herbal edible coatings have the potential to extend the shelf life.
... It has a structure of 1,4-linked β-d-glucose residues and a side chain of trisaccharide bound to an alternating d-glucose residue (Zambrano-Zaragoza et al., 2014). Xanthan gum-based edible coating has been used recently to improve shelf life and quality of fresh-cut fruits (Freitas, Cortez-Vega, Pizato, Prentice-Hernandez, & Borges, 2013), and also as a carrier of bioactive materials (Mohamed, Aboul-Anean, & Hassan, 2013). Xanthan gum-based edible coatings of acerola fruit has been delayed the ripening process (Quoc, Hoa, Ngoc, & Phi, 2015). ...
Article
Polysaccharides, such as pectin, starch, alginate, carrageenan, and xanthan gum, have been used as biopolymer materials to create coatings and edible films to reduce traditional plastic packages. Petrochemical polymers, extensively used for food packaging, are non-renewable and non-biodegradable and need landfills. Thus, there is a requirement to find alternative packaging materials that are easily degradable and renewable. Natural edible polymers are the materials made from natural edible constituents that can be consumed by animals or human beings with no health risk. Since they are directly consumed with food, nothing is left for disposal. Polysaccharides, Protein and Lipid-Based Natural edible polymers are used to make coatings and edible films surrounding the surface of the food. These natural edible polymers are generally categorized into polysaccharides, lipids and proteins. This review article summarizes the importance of various natural polymers used for making coatings and edible films.
... Xanthan gum is an anionic, watersoluble polymer, stable at a wide range of pH and temperature values. It is commonly utilized in foods (e.g., dairy products, baked products, and beverages), pharmaceuticals, and cosmetics (Mohamed et al. 2013). García-Betanzos et al. (2016) incorporated solid lipid nanoparticles (SLN) into xanthan-based films and assayed the effect of hot homogenization methods on the properties of the prepared films. ...
Article
Full-text available
In recent years, the accumulation of synthetic plastics has led to the development of a serious environmental problem. Nowadays, biodegradable films and coatings have been identified as a new approach to solve this problem by preparing renewable, abundant, low-cost materials. Gums are considered a large group of polysaccharides and polysaccharide derivatives that can easily form viscous solutions at low concentrations. Gums are mainly soluble in water and are composed of sugars like glucose, fructose, and mannose. These compounds are categorized into three groups: plant-origin gums, seaweed-based gums, and microbial gums. Microbial gums are listed as generally recognized as safe (GRAS) by the Food and Drug Administration and have a broad range of physicochemical properties suitable for various pharmacy, medicine, and food applications. In the food industry, they can be used as gelling, viscous, stabilizing, and thickening agents. Among the various materials that can potentially improve the properties of biodegradable packaging films, microbial gums such as gellan, xanthan, pullulan, bacterial cellulose, and curdlan have been the subject of numerous studies. These gums can be extruded into films and coatings with considerable barrier properties against the transport of moisture and oxygen. Microbial gums, due to their microbiological stability, adhesion, cohesion, wettability, solubility, transparency, and mechanical properties, can be used as edible films or coatings. Also, these gums can be applied in combination with bioactive compounds that induce the shelf-life extension of highly perishable products. This review focuses on the properties of films and coatings consisting of xanthan, curdlan, pullulan, gellan, and bacterial cellulose.
... Stabilizer, emulsifier, and film former in food industry 27 9. ...
Article
The research on polymeric composites is always in the stage of enhancing the properties. Several researches have been explored in recent decades to investigate the behaviour of both man-made fibre and bio-fibre-reinforced composites. In all these works, an artificial polymeric resin has been utilized as the matrix and it has been revealed that though they provide competent properties, the composites are partially degradable. To enhance the degradability to the fullest extent, both the reinforcements and the matrix must be biodegradable and this could be achieved only if both are derived from natural sources. During the synthesis of a bio-resin, a series of treatments must be followed to make it in to a usable form. The present work addresses a comprehensive survey about various bio-resins, their applications, various synthesis methods followed and the challenges faced during incorporation of reinforcement during composite formulation. The work also gives a clear picture on the challenges faced during characterization of green resin-based composites.
... The trisaccharide chain is formed by β-d-mannose-1-4-β-d-galacturonic acid-1-2-α-d-mannose (Zambrano-Zaragoza et al., 2014). Xantan gum-based edible coatings have been used recently to improve quality and shelf life, also as a carrier of bioactive compounds of minimally processed prickly pear (Mohamed et al., 2013) and fresh cut apples (Freitas et al., 2013), among other fruits. ...
Chapter
Full-text available
In this chapter, we describe details of basic and applied aspects of edible packaging for foods. Important challenges are going on to demonstrate the useful alternative or addition to conventional packaging. Food, Pharma and Biotech sectors recognize the edible packaging as an alternative to reduce waste and to create novel applications for improving desired features of a product, such as stability, quality, safety, variety and convenience for consumers. In this chapter, we include a description of natural polymers base film and coatings, the properties, production, processing and applications of this kind of novel systems for packaging, the use of them as vehicle for functional and bioactive compounds and their applications for food preservation and finally, we discuss the regulatory aspects and commercialization of edible packaging and the importance of the particularities of scaling-up research concepts to commercial applications. Thus, this chapter summarizes relevant information about the edible packaging for foods presenting a brief but clear scenario for future of a promising technology.
... Mohamed, Aboul-Anean, and Hassan (2013) (continued on next page) Brasil, Gomes, Puerta-Gomez, Castell-Perez, and Moreira (2012) Psyllium seed gum, chitosanPsyllium seed gum showed good results in maintaining color or preventing enzymatic browning. Fresh-cut apple Banasaz et al. (2013) Shellac and aloegel, both alone and in combination Ascorbic acid, citric acid and sodium benzoate Shellac and aloe gel coatings on apple slices resulted in significant reduction in respiratory rates and a delay in peak ethylene synthesis rates during low temperature storage. ...
Article
Intake of fruits and vegetables has been linked with various health benefits. Fruits and vegetables can be consumed either fresh or processed. Production and consumption of minimally processed foods is gaining popularity. Fresh-cut fruits and vegetables are being welcomed by the consumers due to the desire for new and natural products coupled with change in life style of the consumers. However, challenge for fresh-cut industry is to maintain fresh like characteristics of fresh-cut produce for a prolonged storage time. Fresh-cut produce has a much larger cut surface and consequently much shorter shelf-life. Loss of quality parameters such as color, firmness, juiciness, flavor and excessive moisture loss results in limited shelf-life and increased chances of rejection of the produce by the consumers. Developments in packaging technology and edible coatings for foods have shown promising results in extending the shelf-life of fresh-cut fruits and vegetables. Therefore, this article reviews the scope of fresh-cut fruits and vegetables and shelf-life extension by means of coating. Application of innovative packaging techniques and novel food coatings would make it possible to meet the ever growing consumer demands and to approach the distant markets with comparatively high quality fresh produce.
... Gums affect mass viscosity, which is an essential feature for the quality of a coating (Fiszman and Salvador, 2003). Xanthan gum has high viscosity and is responsible for forming stable solutions that contribute as stabilizer, thickener and emulsifier in food products (Mohamed et al., 2013). ...
Article
Full-text available
Pequi ( Caryocar brasiliense Camb.), fruit characteristic of the Brazilian cerrado, has sensory and nutritional characteristics, pleasant flavor and aroma and considerable presence of lipids and fiber, essential for human consumption. The aim of this study was to assess the post-harvest conservation of this fruit by using different sources of biofilms as a means to ensure the maintenance of fruit physical and chemical characteristics in order to increase its shelf life. Fruits were submitted to four treatments: control (no coating) (T1); 0.5% w/w carnauba wax (T2); 1% w/w cassava starch (T3) and 1.5% w/w xanthan gum (T4) stored during 15 days at BOD at 22 ± 0.1°C and submitted every three days to analyses of titratable acidity, soluble solid, pH, turgor pressure, vitamin C, weight loss and physical structure by scanning electron microscopy. The pH levels and turgor pressure showed expected values for control and coated pequi fruits. The vitamin C, titratable acidity, soluble solids contents and weight loss showed that coatings did not achieve satisfactory results. However, fruits coated with cassava starch showed the best conservation results during the experimental period. Key words : Coatings, shelf life, storage.
... Moreover, it facilitates the suspension of particulates, even in complex formulations for a long time (Sworn, 2009). Most recently, the effect of xanthan gum coating was studied on minimally processed prickly pear (Mohamed, Aboul-Anean, & Hassan, 2013) and fresh-cut apples (Freitas, Cortez-Vega, Pizato, Prentice-Hernandez, & Borges, 2013;Zambrano-Zaragoza et al., 2014). ...
Article
Full-text available
Edible films and coatings allow preserving fresh and processed food, maintaining quality, preventing microbial contamination and/or oxidation reactions and increasing the shelf life of food products. The structural matrix of edible films and coatings is mainly constituted by proteins, lipids or polysaccharides. However, it is possible to increase the bioactive potential of these polymeric matrices by adding phenolic compounds obtained from plant extracts. Phenolic compounds are known to possess several biological properties such as antioxidant and antimicrobial properties. Incorporating phenolic compounds enriched plant extracts in edible films and coatings contribute to preventing food spoilage/deterioration and the extension of shelf life. This review is focused on edible films and coatings based on gums and starch. Special attention is given to bioactive edible films and coatings incorporating plant extracts enriched in phenolic compounds.
Article
Full-text available
Legitimate postharvest treatment of food produces is a higher priority than the serious and broad cultivating in making sure about nourishment for a country, since misfortunes are a misuse of food as well as they speak to a comparable misuse of human exertion, ranch inputs, jobs, speculations and scant recourses, for example, water. Postharvest misfortunes of agricultural yields when all is said in done and new products of the soil (perishables) specifically are normal issues in creating nations, similar to Ethiopia, which negatively affects the food security program. This is mostly a direct result of their transitory nature, absence of information and deficiency of capital. The other explanation is that a large portion of these perishables are delivered by little scope ranchers the individuals who have restricted information and monetarily poor in the creating nations. Along these lines, assessment of postharvest misfortunes of new foods grown from the ground is exceptionally significant for mindfulness creation to deal with the produce appropriately in order to spare from waste and harms by physical and physiological methods. The destinations of this audit are, hence, to evaluate the accessible writings on the postharvest misfortunes of new foods grown from the ground trying to distinguish need zones of the issue; to distinguish the reasons for misfortunes of perishables so as to dodge the foundations for the decrease of misfortunes; and to distinguish the potential methodologies that can decrease misfortunes and keep up nature of the items during the period.
Thesis
Full-text available
The effects of gum arabic (GA) 10%, chitosan (CH) 1%, calcium chloride (CA) 3%, GA 10% + CH 1%, GA 10% + CA 3%, CH 1% + CA 3% and distilled water as a control of ‘Choke Anan’ mango fruit were investigated. After dipping treatments, the fruits were stored at 2, 6 and 13 °C for 28 days and then transferred to 25 °C for 5 days shelf life. Mango stored at 2 or 6 °C, inhibited physico-chemical changes and delayed the ripening process than those stored at 13 °C. GA 10% or CH 1% coatings significantly reduced weight loss, colour changes, soluble solid concentration, respiration rate, ethylene production and maintained higher firmness or titratable acidity than the control. Mango stored at 2 °C, significantly accumulated higher reactive oxygen species (ROS), malondialdehyse (MDA) content or ion leakage than those stored at 6 and 13 °C. GA 10% and CA 3% treatments decreased hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) content and superoxide anion (O2•−) production in all the three temperatures. The combined application of CA 3% and GA 10% alleviated chilling injury. The enzymatic and non-enzymatic antioxidant defense system of mango stored at 6, 10 and 13 °C were also investigated. The enzymatic and non-enzymatic antioxidant properties of mango were induced at 6 °C than those stored at 10 or 13 °C. Mango treated with GA 10% or GA 10% + CA 3%, enhanced catalase (CAT), ascorbate peroxidase (APX), glutathione reductase (GR) enzyme activities and 2, 2-diphenyl-1-picryl hydrazyl (DPPH) radical scavenging activity. This treatment preserved phenolic content and ascorbic acid. Treated mango maintained cell membranes and mitochondria structure integrity than the control. The results suggest that mango fruit treated with GA 10% plus CA 3% can be stored at 6 °C without much deterioration.
Article
Full-text available
Gums are a class of naturally occurring polysaccharides/carbohydrate polymers derived from renewable sources, which have the capacity to hydrate in water either by forming a gel or stabilizing emulsion systems. Among the substitutes recently considered to replace the application of petroleum-derived polymers against postharvest diseases and shelf life extension, gums and their derivatives have been considered as promising biocontrol products. Polysaccharide gum coatings provide a semipermeable barrier on the surface of produce to reduce respiration rate, weight loss and maintain the nutritional value. Gums have been used as excellent vehicles for active substances, also controlling the speed of diffusion of these, and improving the control of the maturation of fruit and vegetable. Additionally, plant extracts, essential oils, phenolic compounds, and vitamins can be incorporated into polysaccharides edible coatings in order to improve their mechanical barrier, antioxidant and antimicrobial properties. Gums have many advantages over the synthetic polymers, because they have been approved as GRAS by FAO, and their use is safe for the consumer and eco-friendly. This review aims to highlight the most relevant and current information in the use of polysaccharides in postharvest shelf life extension and preservation of overall quality of fruits and vegetables.
Article
Full-text available
Nowadays, fruits and vegetables are highly demanded in the market because of its nutritional value. Fruits and vegetables have short shelf life due to its perishable nature. About 30% fruits and vegetables are affected or damaged by insects, microorganisms, pre and post harvesting conditions during transport and preservation. Preservation of fruits and vegetables is a big challenge for world. Edible coating is an effective method to solve this problem. It provides protective edible covering to fruits and vegetables. It is beneficial for consumers and environment. Today herbal edible coatings are used as a nutraceutical and beneficial for consumer health. Edible coatings are of different types such as hydrocolloids, lipids and plasticisers. These have good barrier properties to O2, CO2, moisture and water vapour.
Article
Natural plant-based gums and their derivatives are widely utilized in food industries, however, their applications as edible coatings to extend fresh fruits and vegetable shelf-life has been explored recently. These natural polymeric polysaccharides have many advantages as compared to synthetic polymers, because they are biodegradable, nontoxic, economical and easily available in the environment. Natural gums can also be semi synthetically modified to produce derivatives, which can easily compete with the synthetic preservatives available on the food market. In this review, the recent developments in the use of natural gums and their derivatives as edible coatings have been explored and discussed.
Article
Full-text available
Nowadays, storing fresh fruit and vegetable by edible film was the best method. There are a lot of chemical which can coat the surface of fruit to increase the preservation time. Among the chemicals was xanthan gum which was known as an additive and applied widely in food technology but it can use currently in the post harvest technology as an edible film. Coating of acerola fruit with xanthan gum has been found to delay the ripening process. Xanthan gum in aqueous solutions of 0.4, 0.6, 0.8, 1.0, 1.2 and 1.4% (w/v) was applied as an edible coating of unripe acerola which were stored at 30°C and 70-80% RH for 6 days. Fruits were coated with 1.4% xanthan gum delayed the ripening process by slowing down the rate of respiration, in terms of percentage weight loss, soluble solids concentration (°Bx), total acidity and color of acerola fruit during storage as compared to the uncoated control and fruit treated with other xanthan gum concentration. The result suggest that using 1.4% xanthan gum as edible coating may form a protective barrier on the surface of acerola, the ripening process of acerola can be delayed and prevented oxygen penetration. It can be prolong the preservation during 6 days at 30°C without any negative effects on quality of fruit. The appearance of acerola does not have blemishes and which is fresh, shiny and bright colored.
ResearchGate has not been able to resolve any references for this publication.