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Coffeetweets: Bonding Around the Bean on Twitter

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Abstract

This chapter explores how we use social media to communicate our experience of the world and bond with others by forming communities of shared values. Microblogging services such as Twitter and Weibo are a form of social media allowing users to publish streams of length-delimited posts to internet-mediated audiences. As such they afford new kinds of interpersonal interaction via the conversation-like exchanges that occur (Honeycutt & Herring, 2009). An example of a length-delimited post (hereafter ‘micropost’) is the following. It contains one of the most common patterns in microblogging, an expression of thanks for personal endorsement: @Tim I love #coffee too This post is addressed to Tim using the @ symbol before the name, a construction which can also function as a reference to the person (e.g. @Tim makes great coffee), and contains a hashtag, the # symbol, which acts as a form of metadata labelling the topic of the post so that it can be found by others. This chapter will consider microposts such as this in terms of how they illuminate the way microblogging as a practice creates alignments around shared quotidian experiences by conferring upon the private realm of daily experience a public audience. The kind of personal expression of the everyday that we see in microposts has never been subject to real-time mass dissemination in the way that we are currently witnessing on Twitter. This chapter focuses on one such personal domain, coffeetalk, that is, discourse relating to coffee as consumed in everyday life.1 I will consider this discourse from two
... Social media creates a public space where users can communicate with each other regardless of time and geographical location. These communicative connections facilitate the formation of a sense of 'ambient affiliation' (Zappavigna, 2012(Zappavigna, , 2014, through which people build a loose community around similar interests and topics. Politics, which is often both controversial and salient, is therefore an important topic in the online public space. ...
... As Seargeant and Tagg (2014) argue, social media enables new social relationsstrangers are linked with each other around certain topics and experiences. These topic-centred connections form an 'ambient affiliation' (Zappavigna, 2012(Zappavigna, , 2014, where people identify a particular topic and build a loose community. Topics, however, are not gender neutral. ...
Article
Two studies were conducted to examine gender differences in the discursive political engagement on Twitter. Study 1 analysed about 5.6 million English tweets regarding nine political issues and one non-political issue. It found that, compared with men’s tweets, a higher proportion of women’s tweets are retweets, and that the majority of women’s retweets originate from men. The results may indicate that women have arelatively lower level of political efficacy and/or sense a higher level of environmental risk than men when participating in political discussions on Twitter. They may also indicate that men have a more significant influence than women on Twitter. Study 2 collected 225 survey responses from the adults in the U.S. via Qualtrics’s online panel. The results partly support the findings of study 1, showing that on average, women have a lower level of perceived political efficacy than men, which affects the likelihood of their political expression along with a feeling of communal support.
... The Twitter hashtag has inspired people not only in Malaysia, but all over the world, to focus on Israel's oppression of Palestinians. It demonstrates that hashtags are significant for conveying more than linguistic meaning, as they influence how users interact with the Twitter platform [71]. Hashtags also demonstrate themes or topics, and they represent an important innovation in social media communication [72]. ...
... Hashtags also demonstrate themes or topics, and they represent an important innovation in social media communication [72]. Furthermore, the hashtag's affiliative function is viewed as a means of investigating the 'imagined audience' [71][73] of users spreading racist denial expressions. ...
... Therefore, bonding icons operate as "emblems or powerfully evocative symbols of social belonging" that have a rallying or privileging function for particular communities (Stenglin, 2004, p. 406). Examples of bonding icons include flags, company logos, or more everyday phenomena such as coffee where individuals rally around the shared positive values which this beverage has accrued such as productivity and conviviality (Zappavigna, 2014). Bonding icons offer a means to construe collective identities: "icons provide the meaning resource for the production and consumption of identity texts, and the texts in turn sustain the icons as socially legitimate ways of talking about identity" (Tann, 2013, p. 380). ...
... Therefore, bonding icons operate as "emblems or powerfully evocative symbols of social belonging" that have a rallying or privileging function for particular communities (Stenglin, 2004, p. 406). Examples of bonding icons include flags, company logos, or more everyday phenomena such as coffee where individuals rally around the shared positive values which this beverage has accrued such as productivity and conviviality (Zappavigna, 2014). Bonding icons offer a means to construe collective identities: "icons provide the meaning resource for the production and consumption of identity texts, and the texts in turn sustain the icons as socially legitimate ways of talking about identity" (Tann, 2013, p. 380). ...
... Drasovean & Tagg (2015) focused on the use of evaluative language in building sociability and solidarity in responses to video clips posted on TED.com. For her part, Zappavigna has focused on evaluative resources-alongside ideation-in processes of affiliation and the forming of communities of shared values in tweets about Obama's 2008 victory or about coffee talk (Zappavigna 2011(Zappavigna , 2014. In her work, Zappavigna has drawn attention to the evaluative role of hashtags and ambient affiliation to build loose communities on Twitter. ...
Chapter
Bou-Franch carries out an empirical study of evaluation, discursive patterns of conflict and prescriptive metapragmatic comments. The author takes a metapragmatic approach (Culpeper,.Impoliteness: Using Language to Cause Offence, Cambridge University Press, Cambridge, 2011; Kádár and Haugh,.Understanding Politeness, Cambridge University Press, Cambridge, 2013; Verschueren,.Pragmatics 10:463–498, 2000) to explore the interconnections of evaluative patterns of conflict with social norms and moral values in a corpus of online commentary published in response to reports of a sport controversy. She argues that the sports controversy, alongside the reports and commentary it triggers, constitute a transmedia story (Jenkins,.Convergence Culture: Where Old and New Media Collide, New York University Press, New York, 2006). In addition, she focuses on the linguistic realisation and sociopragmatic functions of prescriptive metapragmatic comments, which have received scant scholarly attention. She concludes with an analysis of the ways in which the online commentary under scrutiny indexes ideology and contributes to expand the transmedia story.
... On a more general note, while offence is essentially a face-inflicting behaviour which hinges on negative evaluative comments that breach the expected moral behaviour (Haugh and Sinkeviciute, 2019), in some contexts, it may be ascribed to other, even reverse functions. A number of scholars (de Klerk, 1997;DeCapua and Boxer, 1999;Gregory, 2006;Stapleton, 2010, p. 297;Drasovean and Tagg, 2015;Zappavigna, 2014) noticed that cursing may derive from the need to mark one's community affiliation and reinforce group identity. Among members of a group or a community of practice 2 (CfP) as well as close friends, bad language may be utilized to accomplish solidarity and bonding (Norman, 1994;Daly et al., 2004;Vandergriff, 2010, p. 237, Mateo andYus, 2013), to demonstrate power (Schnurr et al., 2008), as well as to seek in-group acceptance through alignment to verbal behaviour of the CoP (Cheshire, 1982;Trudgill 1974;Beers Fägersten, 2001;Daly et al., 2004;Stenström, 2006;Baruch and Jenkins, 2006). ...
Article
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This paper aims to propose a typology of replies to insults based on data retrieved from Twitter, which is ripe with offensive comments. The proposed typology is embedded in the theory of impoliteness, and it hinges on the notion of the perlocutionary effect. It assumes that what counts as an insult depends primarily on whether or not an utterance is evaluated as offensive by the insultee. The evaluation can be signalled behaviourally or verbally and includes expressed replies as well as so-called silent replies. The insults, regardless of the presence or absence of an insulting intention of the insulter (potential insult), that are not rendered as offensive by the target are only attempted insults, while those that are experienced as offensive amount to genuine insults. The analysis has illustrated select types of reactions and has shown that potential, attempted and genuine insults may be further divided into: in/direct insults, explicit/implicit, non-/pure, and non-/vocatives, whilst reactions can be subsumed by three overarching strategies: agreeing, attacking and rejection.
... orgakopoulou 2008; Marković 2012: 137-138;Georgakopoulou 2015; Page 2018: 9). Karakteristike malih priča prepoznate su u mnogim (kratkim) komentarima internetskih korisnika na istu temu koji zajednički kao sukazivači stvaraju podijeljene priče. Žanr podijeljenih priča teorijski je razvijen oslanjajući se i uz koncept vezivanja (engl. bonding) (usp.Zappavigna 2014Zappavigna , 2017Page 2018: 83-100) kojim se objašnjava povezanost internetskih korisnika i njihov osjećaj pripadnosti virtualnim zajednicama na društvenim mrežama bez izravne komunikacije, tj. koje prakse ih povezuju. MicheleZappavigna (2017: 216) vezivanje objašnjava pojmom "ambijentalna pripadnost" (engl. ambient affiliation), tj. dru ...
Article
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The paper discusses the ironic use of the genre of the curse in the humorous discourse of internet genres. In the collective memory, the genre of the curse is a verbal magic genre that implies uttering evil words inflicting harm on someone, and in the humorous discourse of internet genres, curses are applied to some unexpected experience, thus creating an ironic opposition to what the genre of the curse assumes and its role in weblore. In addition to ironizing the genre of the curse, its atypical role of creating a humorous effect in the discourse of internet genres is also pointed out. Such humorous versions of the genre of curses in weblore are referred to as ludic curses. Ludic curses are uttered only in jest, but they retain the remnants of the belief in the power of words manifested by immanent formulations of curses, and above all the phrase "dabogada" (May God), which evokes the desire to harm someone, but they are applied in a humorous context which creates an incongruous situation and therefore a humorous effect. The research focuses on Instagram and Facebook user profiles of the webpage "Mudrolije sa Twittera".
Article
Existing theories within interpersonal (IPC) and intergroup communication (IGC) have not yet explained when online interactions are initially intergroup in nature, interpersonal, or both. We address this undertheorized conundrum—which is particularly challenging as more communication occurs on social media, in which a multitude of goals may converge—by proposing the dual-process model of interpersonal–intergroup communication (IPC–IPG). Focusing on both the situation and a multiple goals perspective, this model can help explain where on the interpersonal–intergroup continuum online interactions fall. The ability to understand and articulate the antecedents and processes that may guide initial interactions can enhance future work by providing a mechanism through which to theorize which set(s) of theory may be most applicable to explain or predict a communicative situation and its outcomes.
Chapter
This chapter introduces a digital ethnographic study conducted within an ultrarunning group on Facebook. I explain the methodological procedures undertaken during the research and present the analytical frameworks used in the research. I explore the ways in which the group function as a Community of Practice (CofP) as I discuss the findings from Phase One of the study. The chapter is intended to form the background for Chapter 3 where I present my findings from Phase Two of the study.
Thesis
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This thesis is concerned with the construal and the recontextualisation of primary social science knowledge in hypermedia texts. More specifically, it provides an account for the relations between verbiage and image in web-based multimodal interactive leaning materials, known as Multimodal Interactives (MIs). Based on the linguistic description, the thesis offers insights into the ways in which knowledge is construed and recontextaulised in the emerging electronic multimodal discourses. The general theoretical orientation of this thesis is that of systemic functional multimodal discourse analysis (SF-MDA). Within the framework of SF-MDA, the thesis proposes a complementary perspective on intersemiosis, which treats relations between verbiage and image as patterns formed during the unfolding of a text. To capture this type of intersemiotic relations, the thesis develops a logogenetic model for SF-MDA. The defining feature the model is the temporal axis (time), which serves as the main reference point for determining semiotic units (logogenetic units) and describing semiotic patterns (logogenetic patterns). The logogenetic model is applied in studying five MIs. The basic logogenetic unit used in analysis is Critical Path, the shortest traversal through a MI. Two types of logogenetic patterns along the Critical Paths in the five MIs are examined in detail, including intersemiotic ideational coupling and clustering. There are five basic types of verbiage-imaged coupling emerged from the analysis, including Naming & Identifying, Representing, Classifying & Co-classifying, and Circumstantiating. The analysis of ideational clustering shows the different ways in which participants and activities form clusters in each MI. By analysing intersemiotic coupling and clustering, the thesis shows that language and image construe the keys notions of primary social science such as people, place and community through three fundamental principles—abstraction, generalisation and specification. The study also demonstrates the possibility of achieving different degrees of pedagogic framing in hypermedia environments.
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This is the first comprehensive account of the Appraisal Framework. The underlying linguistic theory is explained and justified, and the application of this flexible tool, which has been applied to a wide variety of text and discourse analysis issues, is demonstrated throughout by sample text analyses from a range of registers, genres and fields.
Chapter
IntroductionDisciplining the Passions: Towards the Invention of the CriminalLombroso's CriticsCriminalistics, Rational Criminals, and Irrational MassesTechnologies and CrimeWomen and Crime; Race and CrimePopular and Literary Perspectives of CrimeConclusions
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