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Physicochemical and Spectroscopic Characterization of p-Chlorobenzaldehyde: An Impact of Biofield Energy Treatment

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  • Trivedi Global, Inc
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Physicochemical and Spectroscopic Characterization of p-Chlorobenzaldehyde: An Impact of Biofield Energy Treatment

Abstract and Figures

p-Chlorobenzaldehyde (p-CBA) is used as an important chemical intermediate for the preparation of pharmaceuticals, agricultural chemicals, dyestuffs, optical brighteners, and metal finishing products. The study aimed to evaluate the effect of biofield energy treatment on the physicochemical and spectroscopic properties of p-CBA. The study was accomplished in two groups i.e. control and treated. The control group was remained as untreated, while the treated group was subjected to Mr. Trivedi’s biofield energy treatment. Finally, both the samples (control and treated) were evaluated using various analytical techniques. The surface area analysis showed a substantial increase in the surface area by 23.06% after biofield treatment with respect to the control sample. The XRD analysis showed the crystalline nature of both control and treated samples. The X-ray diffractogram showed the significant alteration in the peak intensity in treated sample as compared to the control. The XRD analysis showed the slight increase (2.31%) in the crystallite size of treated sample as compared to the control. The TGA analysis exhibited the decrease (10%) in onset temperature of thermal degradation form 140°C (control) to 126°C in treated sample. The Tmax (maximum thermal degradation temperature) was slightly decreased (2.14%) from 157.09°C (control) to 153.73°C in treated sample of p-CBA. This decrease in Tmax was possibly due to early phase of vaporization in treated sample as compared to the control. The FT-IR spectrum of treated p-CBA showed the increase in wavenumber of C=C stretching as compared to the control. The UV spectroscopic study showed the similar pattern of wavelength in control and treated samples. Altogether, the surface area, XRD, TGA-DTG and FT-IR analysis suggest that Mr. Trivedi’s biofield energy treatment has the impact to alter the physicochemical properties of p-CBA. This treated p-CBA could be utilized as a better chemical intermediate than the control p-CBA for the synthesis of pharmaceutical drugs and organic chemicals.
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2015
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Mahendra Kumar Trivedi1,
Alice Branton1,
Dahryn Trivedi1,
Gopal Nayak1,
Khemraj Bairwa2 and
Snehasis Jana2
1 Trivedi Global Inc., 10624 S Eastern
Avenue Suite A-969, Henderson, NV
89052, USA
2 Trivedi Science Research Laboratory
Pvt. Ltd., Hall-A, Chinar Mega Mall,
Chinar Fortune City, Hoshangabad Rd.,
Bhopal, Madhya Pradesh, India
Corresponding author: Snehasis Jana
Trivedi Science Research Laboratory Pvt.
Ltd., Hall-A, Chinar Mega Mall, Chinar
Fortune City, Hoshangabad Rd., Bhopal-462
026, Madhya Pradesh, India.
publication@trivedieect.com
Tel: +91-755-6660006
Physicochemical and Spectroscopic
Characterizaon of p-Chlorobenzaldehyde: An
Impact of Bioeld Energy Treatment
Abstract
p-Chlorobenzaldehyde (p-CBA) is used as an important chemical intermediate
for the preparaon of pharmaceucals, agricultural chemicals, dyestus, opcal
brighteners, and metal nishing products. The study aimed to evaluate the
eect of bioeld energy treatment on the physicochemical and spectroscopic
properes of p-CBA. The study was accomplished in two groups i.e. control and
treated. The control group was remained as untreated, while the treated group
was subjected to Mr. Trivedi’s bioeld energy treatment. Finally, both the samples
(control and treated) were evaluated using various analycal techniques. The
surface area analysis showed a substanal increase in the surface area by 23.06%
aer bioeld treatment with respect to the control sample. The XRD analysis
showed the crystalline nature of both control and treated samples. The X-ray
diractogram showed the signicant alteraon in the peak intensity in treated
sample as compared to the control. The XRD analysis showed the slight increase
(2.31%) in the crystallite size of treated sample as compared to the control. The
TGA analysis exhibited the decrease (10%) in onset temperature of thermal
degradaon form 140°C (control) to 126°C in treated sample. The Tmax (maximum
thermal degradaon temperature) was slightly decreased (2.14%) from 157.09°C
(control) to 153.73°C in treated sample of p-CBA. This decrease in Tmax was possibly
due to early phase of vaporizaon in treated sample as compared to the control.
The FT-IR spectrum of treated p-CBA showed the increase in wavenumber of C=C
stretching as compared to the control. The UV spectroscopic study showed the
similar paern of wavelength in control and treated samples.
Altogether, the surface area, XRD, TGA-DTG and FT-IR analysis suggest that Mr.
Trivedi’s bioeld energy treatment has the impact to alter the physicochemical
properes of p-CBA. This treated p-CBA could be ulized as a beer chemical
intermediate than the control p-CBA for the synthesis of pharmaceucal drugs
and organic chemicals.
Keywords: Bioeld energy treatment; p-Chlorobenzaldehyde; Surface area; X-Ray
diracon; Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy; UV-Vis spectroscopy.
Abbreviaons: NCCAM: Naonal Center for Complementary and Alternave
Medicine; NIH: Naonal Instute of Health; XRD: X-ray diracon; TGA:
Thermogravimetric analysis; DTG: Derivave Thermogravimetry
Introducon
p-Chlorobenzaldehyde (p-CBA) is an organic compound
comprising of benzene ring with formyl and chlorine substuents
at 1 and 4 posions, respecvely. The p-CBA is used as an
important reacon intermediate for the manufacturing of several
pharmaceucal drugs and agricultural chemicals [1]. It is used in
the producon of triphenyl methane and related dyes. It is also
used for opcal brighteners and metal nishing products [1,2].
The p-CBA is commercially produced by side-chain chlorinaon
of p-CBA followed by acid hydrolysis [3]. The p-CBA along with
p-chloroaniline is used for the synthesis of Schi base. The Schi
bases are versale imine (C=N) containing compounds having
broad spectrum of biological acvies [4]. The incorporaon
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Insights in Analytical Electrochemistry
of metals in Schi base in the form of metal complexes
exhibited some degree of biological acvies like anfungal [5],
anbacterial [6], ancancer [7], and an-inammatory acvity
[8]. As p-CBA used as an important reaction intermediate, its rate
of reacon plays a crucial role. The literature suggests that any
alteraon in crystallite size and surface area can aect the kinecs
of reacon [9]. Moreover, the thermal properes i.e. vaporizaon
temperature, decomposion temperature of chemical compound
also aect the reacon kinecs [10]. Therefore, considering the
importance of p-CBA, it is important to discover an alternate and
safe approach, which can improve the overall physicochemical
properes of compound. Recently, bioeld energy treatment has
been reported to alter the physicochemical as well as spectral
properes of various organic compounds and pharmaceucal
drugs [11-13].
The Naonal Instute of Health/Naonal Center for
Complementary and Alternave Medicine (NIH/NCCAM)
conceived the healing energy (putave energy elds) treatment
under the subcategory of energy therapies [14]. It is reported that
human body is permeated and surrounded with the bioenergec
eld (subtle energy eld) [15]. The health of living organism
depends on the balance of this bioenergecs eld. In the diseased
situaon, this bioenergecs eld gets depleted [16]. The experts
of energy medicine manipulate and balance this bioenergecs
eld via harnessing the energy from the Universe [17]. Thus, the
human (expert of energy medicine) has the ability to harness the
energy from the Universe and transfer it to any living or nonliving
object to balance or re-paern the electromagnec energy eld
[18]. The objects always receive this energy and respond in the
useful way [19]. The bioeld energy therapy is being pracced
in the form of healing therapy or therapeuc touch throughout
the world and especially in the western countries [20,21]. It is
esmated that about 36% of Americans regularly uses some
form of Complementary and Alternave Medicine (CAM) [22].
The bioeld energy treatment is eecvely used to smulate the
overall health of human being by reducing the pain and anxiety
[23,24].
Mr. Trivedi is well known for his unique bioeld energy treatment
(The Trivedi Eect®) that has been evaluated in numerous arenas
like agricultural research [25], biotechnology research [26],
microbiology research [27,28], pharmaceucal sciences [13,19],
and materials science [29,30].
Hence, based on the prominent impact of bioeld energy
treatment and signicance of p-CBA as a chemical intermediate,
the present study was aimed to evaluate the eect of Mr.
Trivedi’s bioeld energy treatment on the physicochemical
and spectroscopic properes of p-CBA. The analysis was
done using surface area analyzer, X-ray diractometry (XRD),
thermogravimetric analysis-derivave thermogravimetry (TGA-
DTG), Fourier transform infrared (FT-IR) spectroscopy, and UV-Vis
spectrometry.
Materials and Methods
Study design
The p-chlorobenzaldehyde (p-CBA) was purchased from Loba
Chemie Pvt. Ltd., India. The p-CBA was divided into two groups
i.e. control and treated. The control sample was kept without
treatment, while the treated sample in sealed pack was handed
over to Mr. Trivedi to render the bioeld energy treatment under
laboratory condions. Mr. Trivedi provided the bioeld energy
treatment to the treated group via his unique energy transmission
process without touching the sample [13]. Aerward, both
the control and treated samples were analyzed with respect
to physicochemical and spectroscopic properes using various
techniques like surface area analyzer, XRD, TGA-DTG, FT-IR and
UV-vis spectroscopy.
Surface area analysis
The surface area of control and treated p-CBA was analyzed using
the Brunauer–Emme–Teller (BET) surface area analyzer (Smart
SORB 90) based on the ASTM D 5604 method. The range of the
instrument was 0.2 m2/g to 1000 m2/g. The percent change in
surface area was calculated with the help of following equaon:
[ ]
Treated Control
Control
S S
% change in surface area 100
S
= ×
Here, S Control is the surface area of the control sample and S Treated is
the surface area of treated sample.
XRD study
The XRD analysis of p-CBA (control and treated) samples was
done on Phillips (Holland PW 1710) X-ray diractometer with
copper anode and nickel lter. The wavelength of XRD system
was set to 1.54056 Å. The percent change in average crystallite
size (G) was calculated using following equaon:
G=[(Gt-Gc)/Gc] × 100
Here, Gc and Gt are average crystallite size of control and treated
powder samples, respecvely.
TGA-DTG analysis
The TGA-DTG analysis was carried out on Meler Toledo
simultaneous TGA-DTG analyzer. The analytes were heated up
to 400°C from room temperature at the heang rate of 5°C/
min under air atmosphere. The onset temperature of thermal
degradaon and Tmax (temperature at which maximum weight
loss occur) in samples were obtained from TGA-DTG thermogram.
Spectroscopic studies
The treated sample of p-CBA was divided into two groups i.e. T1
and T2 for the FT-IR and UV-vis spectroscopy. The spectral data of
treated samples were compared with the respecve spectral data
of control sample.
FT-IR spectroscopic characterizaon
The FT-IR spectroscopy was done to determine the eect of
bioeld energy treatment on dipole moment, force constant, and
bond strength in chemical structure [31]. The samples for FT-IR
analysis were prepared by crushing with spectroscopic grade
KBr into ne powder. Subsequently, the mixture was pressed
into pellets. The spectra were obtained from Shimadzu’s Fourier
transform infrared spectrometer (Japan) with the frequency
range of 500-4000 cm-1.
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UV-Vis spectroscopic analysis
The UV spectra of control and treated samples of p-CBA were
obtained from Shimadzu UV spectrometer (2400 PC) with quartz
cell of 1 cm and a slit width of 2.0 nm. The analysis was done at
the wavelength range of 200-400 nm.
Results and Discussion
Surface area analysis
The surface area of control and treated p-CBA are shown in Figure
1. The surface area of control and treated sample were found as
0.2498 m2/g and 0.3074 m2/g, respecvely. The result showed an
increase in surface area by 23.06% in the treated sample with
respect to the control sample. It is well known that surface area is
inversely proporonal to the parcle size [32]. Based on this, it is
presumed that bioeld energy induced the milling process, which
leads to decrease the parcle size of treated sample. As a result,
the surface area of treated sample was increased signicantly.
XRD analysis
The XRD diractograms of p-CBA (control and treated) samples
are shown in Figure 2. The XRD diractograms of both samples
showed the sharp and intense peaks that suggest the crystalline
nature of control and treated samples. The XRD diractogram
of control sample showed the peaks at 2θ equal to 13.6°, 16.8°,
17.09°, 18.85°, 19.06°, 21.48°, 26.86°, 27.45°, 41.01°, and 42.91°.
Similarly, the XRD diractogram of treated p-CBA exhibited the
XRD peaks at 2θ equal to 13.73°, 14.98°, 16.71°, 19.19°, 27.26°,
29.38°, 30.61°, 40.81°, 42.35°, and 47.77°. The Figure 2 showed
the signicant alteraon in the intensity of XRD peaks intensity
aer bioeld treatment as compared to the control sample. The
most intense peak in control sample was observed at 19.06°;
while in treated sample the most intense peak was observed
at 29.38°. The literature suggests that alteraon in crystal
morphology may lead to alteraon in relave intensies of the
peaks [33]. Addionally, it is reported that internal strain can also
change the 2θ values [34]. Based on this, it is hypothesized that
bioeld energy treatment was induced an internal strain in the
treated sample that might be responsible for the alteraon in its
2θ values with respect to the control sample.
The average crystallite size of the control sample was calculated
as 154.52 nm, while the crystallite size of treated sample was
calculated as 158.09 nm. The result depicted a slight increase
(2.31%) in the crystallite size of treated sample with respect to
the control (Figure 3). It is previously reported that increase in
annealing temperature expressively aects the crystallite size
of the compounds. The increase in temperature might lead to
decrease in dislocaon density and increase in the number of unit
cell; these nally increases the average crystallite size of sample
[35,36]. Based on this, it is assumed that bioeld treatment might
provide some thermal energy to p-CBA molecules. Consequently,
the dislocaon density might be reduced and thus the number
of unit cells and average crystallite size were increased in the
treated sample.
TGA-DTG analysis
The TGA-DTG thermogram of p-CBA samples (control and treated)
are shown in Figure 4 and data are presented in (Table 1). The TGA
thermogram of control sample showed an iniaon (on-set) of
thermal degradaon at 140°C, which was ended (end-set) at
183°C. Similarly, the TGA thermogram of the treated sample
exhibited the on-set temperature at 126°C that was terminated
(end-set) at 185.5°C. The result showed about 10% decrease
in the onset temperature in bioeld energy treated sample
as compared to the control. The TGA-DTG study showed the
decrease in thermal stability of treated sample with respect to
the control that could be correlated to increase in the chemical
Figure 1 Surface area analysis of control and treated
p-chlorobenzaldehyde. Figure 2 XRD diractogram of p-chlorobenzaldehyde.
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reacvity of p-CBA. Moreover, the percentage weight loss during
the thermal decomposion was found as 51.25% in the control,
while 52.18% in the treated sample. The result showed a mere
increase in percent weight loss during thermal decomposion of
treated sample with respect to the control. Moreover, the DTG
thermogram exhibited the Tmax (temperature at which the sample
lost its maximum weight) at 157.09°C in the control sample and at
153.73°C in the treated sample. The result showed about 2.14%
decrease in Tmax of treated sample as compared to the control.
This might occur due to the changes in internal energy via bioeld
energy treatment, which may cause to early phase of evaporaon
in treated sample with respect to the control [37].
FT-IR spectroscopic analysis
FT-IR spectra of the control and treated p-CBA are shown in Figure
5. The p-CBA molecule contains =C-H, C=C, C-C, C=O, C-Cl groups
of vibraons. The =C-H (aromac) stretching was aributed to
peaks at 3088 cm-1 in control and treated (T1 and T2) samples.
While, the aldehyde C-H stretching was assigned to peak
appeared at 2860 cm-1 in all the control and treated samples. The
aldehyde C-H asymmetrical bending was aributed to peak at
1485 cm-1 in all the three samples (control, T1 and T2). Moreover,
the aldehyde C-H symmetrical bending was aributed to peaks
observed at 1386 cm-1 in control and T1 sample and 1384 cm-1
in T2 sample. The out of plane ring deformaon was assigned to
peaks at 1093-1207 cm-1 region of spectra in all three samples;
whereas, the in-plane deformaon was assigned to peaks in the
range of 702-839 cm-1 (control), 704-839 cm-1 (T1), and 704-837
cm-1 (T2) sample.
The C=C (aromac) stretching was assigned to peaks appeared at
1575-1589 cm-1 in control and T1 samples, while it was appeared
at 1577-1597 cm-1 in T2 sample. Similarly, the C-C stretching was
Figure 3 Average crystallite size of control and treated
p-chlorobenzaldehyde.
Figure 4 TGA-DTG thermogram of control and treated
p-chlorobenzaldehyde.
Figure 5 FT-IR spectra of control and treated (T1 and T2)
p-chlorobenzaldehyde.
Table 1 Thermal analysis of control and treated samples of
p-chlorobenzaldehyde. Tmax: Temperature at maximum weight loss
occurs.
Parameter Control Treated
Onset temperature (°C) 140.00 126.00
End-set temperature (°C) 183.00 185.50
Tmax (°C) 157.09 153.73
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data showed the upstream shiing of C=C stretching frequencies
with respect to the control. This might be due to the increase in
force constant and bond strength of C=C group in treated p-CBA
molecule as compared to the control.
Overall, the present study concluded the substanal impact of
Mr. Trivedi’s bioeld energy treatment on physicochemical and
spectroscopic properes of p-CBA. Based on this, it is ancipated
that Mr. Trivedi’s unique bioeld energy treatment can eecvely
transform the physicochemical properes of p-CBA into the
more useful form so that it could be ulized as a beer chemical
intermediate for the synthesis of pharmaceucal drugs and
organic chemicals.
Acknowledgements
The authors would like to acknowledge the Trivedi Science,
Trivedi Master Wellness and Trivedi Tesmonials for their sturdy
support throughout the work. Authors would also like to thanks
the whole team of MGV pharmacy college, Nashik to allowing the
instrumental facility for this work.
assigned to peaks at 1292 cm-1 in control and T1 samples, while
it was observed at 1294 cm-1 in T2 sample. The C=O stretching
peak was assigned to peaks at 1699 cm-1 in control sample and
1701 cm-1 in the treated samples. In addion, the C-O and C-Cl
stretching were appeared at 1012 cm-1 and 542 cm-1, respecvely
in all the three samples (control, T1 and T2).
The result showed a slight increase in the frequency of C=C
stretching in T2 sample as compared to the control. This is might
be due to increased bond strength of C=C group in treated p-CBA
molecules as compared to the control. The stretching frequency
of any bond depends on the dipole moment (µ) and reduced
mass (m) [38,39]. Therefore, it is presumed that bioeld energy
treatment might increase the dipole moment of C=C bond as
compared to the control sample. Except this, rest of the IR
vibraon peaks were appeared at the similar frequency region in
all three samples.
UV-Vis spectroscopy
UV spectra of the control and treated p-CBA are shown in Figure
6. The UV spectrum of control sample showed the absorbance
maxima max) at 206.6 and 254.4 nm. Similarly, the UV spectra
of treated sample showed the λmax at 206.8 and 254.6 nm in T1
and 207.5 and 254.0 nm in T2 sample. The result showed the
similar paern of absorbance maxima in the control and treated
samples.
The compound absorbs UV waves due to transion of electrons
from highest occupied molecular orbital (HOMO) to highest
unoccupied molecular orbital (LUMO). When the energy gap
between HOMO and LUMO (also called as HOMO-LUMO gap)
altered, the wavelength (λmax) was also altered [31]. However,
the UV study of p-CBA showed the similar paern of absorbance
maxima in both the control and treated samples. Therefore, it
can be concluded that the bioeld treatment did not distract
the energy gap between HOMO-LUMO in treated sample, as
compared to the control sample.
Conclusions
In conclusion, the present study showed the substanal increase
in surface area of treated sample by 23.06% as compared to the
control sample. The XRD study showed the crystalline nature of
both control and treated sample. Moreover, the intensity of XRD
peaks were also altered aer bioeld treatment as compared
to the control. The TGA-DTG study showed the slight decrease
(10.0%) in onset temperature of thermal degradaon with
respect to the control. The decrease in thermal stability might be
correlated to increase in chemical reacvity of p-CBA. The FT-IR
Figure 6 UV spectra of control and treated (T1 and T2)
p-chlorobenzaldehyde.
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... The National Center of Complementary and Integrative Health (NCCIH) has recognized and accepted Biofield Energy Healing as a Complementary and Alternative Medicine (CAM) health care approach in addition to other therapies, medicines and practices such as natural products, deep breathing, yoga, Tai Chi, Qi Gong, chiropractic/osteopathic manipulation, meditation, massage, special diets, homeopathy, progressive relaxation, guided imagery, acupressure, acupuncture, relaxation techniques, hypnotherapy, healing touch, movement therapy, pilates, rolfing structural integration, mindfulness, Ayurvedic medicine, traditional Chinese herbs and medicines, naturopathy, essential oils, aromatherapy, Reiki, cranial sacral therapy and applied prayer (as is common in all religions, like Christianity, Hinduism, Buddhism and Judaism) [18]. Biofield Energy Healing Treatment (The Trivedi Effect ® ) has been published in numerous peerreviewed science journals due to its significant impacts in the science fields of biotechnology [19,20], genetics [21,22], cancer [23], microbiology [24][25][26], materials science [27,28], agriculture [29,30], pharmaceuticals [31,32], nutraceuticals [33,34], organic compounds [35,36]. These publications reported that Biofield Energy Treatment (The Trivedi Effect ® ) has the significant capability to alter the physical, structural, chemical, thermal, and behavioral properties of the wide varieties of living and non-living substances. ...
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Magnesium gluconate is an organometallic pharmaceutical compound used for the prevention and treatment of hypomagnesemia. The objective of the current research work was to examine the influence of The Trivedi Effect®-Energy of Consciousness Healing Treatment (Biofield Energy Treatment) on magnesium gluconate for the alteration in the physicochemical, structural, thermal and behavioral properties using PXRD, PSD, FT-IR, UV-vis spectroscopy, TGA, and DSC analysis. Magnesium gluconate was divided into two parts – one part was control without any Biofield Energy Treatment, while another part was treated with The Trivedi Effect®-Energy of Consciousness Healing Treatment remotely by twenty renowned Biofield Energy Healers and defined as The Trivedi Effect® treated sample. The PXRD analysis exhibited that the crystallite size of the treated sample was remarkably altered from -63.63% to 80.14% compared with the control sample. The average crystallite size was significantly reduced by 22.14% in the treated sample compared with the control sample. The particle size values in the treated sample at d10 and d50 values were significantly decreased by 4.41% and 8.67% respectively, whereas at d90 value was increased by 3.99% compared to the control sample. The surface area analysis revealed that surface area of the treated sample was significantly increased by 5.21% compared with the control sample. The FT-IR and UV-vis analysis showed that structure of the magnesium gluconate remained identical in both the treated and control samples. The TGA analysis shown four steps thermal degradation of both the samples and the total weight loss of the treated sample was significantly decreased by 4.29% compared with the control sample. The melting temperature of the control and treated samples were 171.02°C and 170.93°C, respectively. The latent heat of fusion was significantly increased by 32.33% in the treated sample compared with the control sample. The TGA and DSC analysis indicated that the thermal stability of the treated sample was significantly improved compared with the control sample. The current study revealed that The Trivedi Effect®-Energy of Consciousness Healing Treatment might produce a new polymorphic form of magnesium gluconate, which could be more soluble and bioavailable along with improved thermal stability compared with the untreated compound. The treated sample could be more stable during manufacturing, delivery or storage conditions than the untreated sample. Hence, The Trivedi Effect® Treated magnesium gluconate would be very useful to design better nutraceutical/pharmaceutical formulations that might offer better therapeutic responses against inflammatory diseases, immunological disorders, stress, aging, and other chronic infections.
... Biofield Energy Healing Treatment (The Trivedi Effect ® ) has been published in numerous peerreviewed science journals due to its significant impacts in the science fields of biotechnology, genetics, cancer, microbiology, materials science, agriculture, and pharmaceuticals. These publications reported that Biofield Energy Treatment (The Trivedi Effect ® ) has the astounding capability to transform the physical, structural, chemical, thermal and behavioral properties of several pharmaceuticals [23,24], nutraceuticals [25,26], organic compounds [27][28][29][30], metals and ceramics in materials science [31][32][33], improve the overall productivity of crops [34][35][36], as well as modulate the efficacy of various living cells [37][38][39][40]. Although magnesium gluconate displays the highest bioavailability and moderate solubility in water in comparison to other magnesium salts, humans still face problems in achieving their daily requirements of magnesium [41]. ...
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Magnesium gluconate is a classical organometallic salt used for the prevention and treatment of magnesium deficiency diseases. The objective of the current research was to explore the influence of The Trivedi Effect® - Energy of Consciousness Healing Treatment (Biofield Energy Healing Treatment) on magnesium gluconate for the change in the physicochemical, structural, thermal and behavioral properties using PXRD, PSD, FT-IR, UV-vis spectroscopy, TGA, and DSC analysis. Magnesium gluconate was divided into two parts – one part was control, while another part was treated with The Trivedi Effect® - Energy of Consciousness Healing Treatment remotely by seven renowned Biofield Energy Healers and defined as the Biofield Energy Treated sample. The PXRD analysis exhibited significant alteration of the crystal morphology of the treated sample compared with the control sample. The crystallite size of the treated sample was remarkably changed from range -69.99% to 71.40% compared with the control sample. The average crystallite size was significantly decreased in the treated sample by 13.61% compared with the control sample. Particle size analysis revealed that the particle size in the treated sample at d10, d50, and d90 value was significantly decreased by 5.19%, 26.77%, and 18.22%, respectively compared with the control sample. The treated sample’s surface area was significantly enhanced (12.82%) compared with the control sample. The FT-IR and UV-vis analysis showed that the structure of the magnesium gluconate remained the same in both the treated and control samples. The TGA analysis revealed the four steps thermal degradation of the both samples and the total weight loss of the Biofield Energy Treated sample was increased by 0.55% compared with the control sample. The DSC analysis revealed that the melting temperature of the treated sample (171.72°C) was increased by 0.21% compared with the control sample (171.36°C). The latent heat of fusion was increased by 4.66% in the treated sample compared with the control sample. This result indicated that the thermal stability of treated sample was improved compared with the control sample. The current study infers that The Trivedi Effect® - Biofield Energy Healing might lead to a new polymorphic form of magnesium gluconate, which would be more soluble, bioavailable, and thermally stable compared with the untreated compound. Hence, the treated magnesium gluconate would be very useful to design better nutraceutical/pharmaceutical formulations that might offer better therapeutic responses against inflammatory diseases, immunological disorders, stress, aging and other chronic infections.
... This is known as biofield energy treatment or energy medicine and is recognized as complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) [18,19]. The Trivedi Effect ®biofield energy healing has recently drawn attention in the various scientific fields, such as medical science [20], biotechnology [21,22], microbiology [23,24], organic chemistry [25,26], pharmaceutical [27], nutraceutical [28], materials science [29,30], and agricultural [31,32] due to its outstanding applicability to modify the characteristic properties of the living and non-living substances. Number of literatures [33][34][35][36] indicated that biofield energy treatment (also known as The Trivedi Effect ® ) might be a potential method for alteration of the isotopic abundance ratio in the organic compounds. ...
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p-tert-Butyphenol (PTBP) is a phenolic monomer used in the synthesis of numerous industrially useful chemicals. The current research work aimed to evaluate the effect of the biofield energy treatment on the isotopic abundance ratios of PM+1/PM and PM+2/PM in PTBP using gas chromatography - mass spectrometry (GC-MS). The sample, PTBP was distributed into two parts - one part was designated as control PTBP and another part was considered as biofield energy treated PTBP. The biofield energy treatment was achieved through unique biofield energy transmission process by Mr. Trivedi (also known as The Trivedi Effect®). T1, T2, T3, and T4 were indicated to the different time interval analysis of the biofield treated PTBP. The GC-MS spectra of the both control and biofield treated PTBP showed the presence of molecular ion peak [M+] at m/z 150 (calculated 150.10 for C10H14O) along with eight major fragmented peaks at m/z 135, 107, 95, 91, 77, 65, 41, and 39, which might be due to C10H15+, C7H7O+ or C8H11+, C6H7O+, C7H7+, C6H5+, C5H5+, C3H5+, and C3H3••+ ions, respectively. The relative intensities of the parent molecule and other fragmented ions of the biofield treated PTBP were altered as compared to the control PTBP. The percentage in the isotopic abundance ratio of PM+1/PM was enhanced in the biofield treated PTBP at T2, T3 and T4 by 1.60%, 3.57%, and 120.13%, respectively while it was decreased by 4.14% in the treated sample at T1 with respect to the control PTBP. Consequently, the isotopic abundance ratio of PM+2/PM was increased in the biofield treated PTBP at T1, T3, and T4 by 1.28%, 2.56%, and 123.08%, respectively with respect to the control sample. On the other hand, it was reduced in the biofield treated sample at T2 by 1.28% as compared to the control PTBP. Concisely, 13C, 2H, and 17O contributions from (C10H14O)+ to m/z 151 and 18O contribution from (C10H14O)+ to m/z 152 in the biofield treated PTBP were changed with respect to the control sample and was found to have time dependent effect. The biofield energy treated PTBP might display isotope effects such as different physicochemical and thermal properties, rate of the reaction, selectivity and binding energy due to the changed isotopic abundance ratio as compared to the control sample. Biofield treated PTBP could be valuable for the designing new chemicals and pharmaceuticals through using its kinetic isotope effects.
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Increasing cancer rates particularly in the developed world are associated with related lifestyle and environmental exposures. Combined immunotherapy and targeted therapies are the main treatment approaches in advanced and recurrent cancer. An alternate approach, energy medicine is increasingly used in life threatening problems to promote human wellness. This study aimed to investigate the effect of biofield treatment on cancer biomarkers involved in human endometrium and prostate cancer cell lines. Each cancer cell lines were taken in two sealed tubes i.e. one tube was considered as control and another tube was subjected to Mr. Trivedi’s biofield treatment, referred as treated. Control and treated samples were studied for the determination of cancer biomarkers such as multifunctional cytokines viz. interleukin-6 (IL-6) and tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-α), interleukin-2 receptor (IL-2R), prostate specific antigen (PSA), and free prostate specific antigen (FPSA) concentrations using ELISA assay on day 10. Experimental results showed a significant reduction of IL-6 level in endometrium (12%) and prostate (98.8%) cancer cell lines while a significant increase was observed in TNF-α level in endometrium (385%) and prostate (89.8%) cancer cell lines as compared to control. No alteration of PSA level was observed in biofield treated endometrium and prostate cell line. Similarly, no alterations were evident in IL-2R and FPSA levels in endometrium and prostate cell lines after biofield treatment as compared to control. In conclusion, results suggest that biofield treatment has shown significant alterations in the level of cytokines (IL-6 and TNF-α) in both endometrium and prostate cancer cell lines.
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Thymol and menthol are naturally occurring plant derived compounds, which have excellent pharmaceutical and antimicrobial applications. The aim of this work was to evaluate the impact of biofield energy on physical and structural characteristics of thymol and menthol. The control and biofield treated compounds (thymol and menthol) were characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD), Differential Scanning Calorimetry (DSC), Thermogravimetric analysis (TGA), and Fourier Transform Infrared Spectroscopy (FT-IR). XRD study revealed increase in intensity of the XRD peaks of treated thymol, which was correlated to high crystallinity of the treated sample. The treated thymol showed significant increase in crystallite size by 50.01% as compared to control. However, the treated menthol did not show any significant change in crystallite size as compared to control. DSC of treated menthol showed minimal increase in melting temperature (45ºC) as compared to control (44ºC). The enthalpy (∆H) of both the treated compounds (thymol and menthol) was decreased as compared to control samples which could be due the high energy state of the powders. TGA analysis showed that thermal stability of treated thymol was increased as compared to control; though no change in thermal stability was noticed in treated menthol. FT-IR spectrum of treated thymol showed increase in wave number of –OH stretching vibration peak (14 cm-1) as compared to control. Whereas, the FT-IR spectrum of treated menthol showed appearance of new stretching vibration peaks in the region of 3200-3600 cm-1 which may be attributed to the presence of hydrogen bonding in the sample as compared to control. Overall, the result showed that biofield treatment has substantially changed the structural and physical properties of thymol and menthol.
Book
The field of materials science and engineering is rapidly evolving into a science of its own. While traditional literature in this area often concentrates primarily on property and structure, the Materials Processing Handbook provides a much needed examination from the materials processing perspective. This unique focus reflects the changing complexity of new and emerging materials such as cutting-edge semiconductors, smart materials, and materials based on spintronics. This highly comprehensive work also presents groundbreaking coverage of the processes applied to a myriad of solid materials including ceramics, polymers, metals, composites, and semiconductors. Organized into six sections, this work examines processes that convert one phase into another, processes that change only the microstructure within a solid phase, shape changes that modify the microstructure and properties of materials, joining processes, and the basics of processes integration. Rich in data, yet accessible across several fields, this volume provides technicians and students with a one-stop resource on proven and promising new developments in materials processing.
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Transition metal oxides (TMOs) have been known for their extraordinary electrical and magnetic properties. In the present study, some transition metal oxides (Zinc oxide, iron oxide and copper oxide) which are widely used in the fabrication of electronic devices were selected and subjected to biofield treatment. The atomic and crystal structures of TMOs were carefully studied by Fourier transform infrared (FT-IR) spectroscopy and X-ray diffraction (XRD) studies. XRD analysis reveals that biofield treatment significantly changed the lattice strain in unit cells, crystallite sizes and densities in ceramics oxide powders. The computed molecular weight of the treated samples exhibited significant variation. FT-IR spectra indicated that biofield treatment has altered the metal-oxygen bond strength. Since biofield treatment significantly altered the crystallite size, lattice strain and bond strength, we postulate that electrical and magnetic properties in TMOs (transition metal oxides) can be modulated by biofield treatment.
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A new ligand N-benzoyl-N′-2-furanthiocarbohydrazide (H 2Bfth) formed 1:1 deprotonated complexes with Co(II), Ni(II), Cu(II) and Zn(II) while 1:2 deprotonated complexes with Mn(II), Fe(II) and Cd(II). The complexes have been characterized by elemental analyses, magnetic susceptibility measurements, and UV-vis, IR, ESR, NMR ( 1H and 13C), mass/FAB mass and Mössbauer spectral studies. The biological activity have been screened against several bacteria and fungi.