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Characterization of Physical, Thermal and Spectral Properties of Biofield Treated O-Aminophenol

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O-aminophenol has extensive uses as a conducting material and in electrochemical devices. The objective of this research was to investigate the influence of biofield energy treatment on the physical thermal and spectral properties of o-aminophenol. The study was performed in two groups; the control group was remained as untreated, while the treated group was subjected to Mr. Trivedi’s biofield energy treatment. Subsequently, the control and treated o-aminophenol samples were characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD), Differential scanning calorimetry (DSC), Thermogravimetric analysis (TGA), surface area analysis, Fourier transform infrared (FT-IR) spectroscopy, and Ultra violet-visible spectroscopy analysis (UV-vis). The XRD analysis showed an increase in peak intensity of the treated o-aminophenol with respect to the control. Additionally, the crystallite size of the treated o-aminophenol was increased by 34.51% with respect to the control sample. DSC analysis showed a slight increase in the melting temperature of the treated sample as compared to the control. However, a significant increase in the latent heat of fusion was observed in the treated o-aminophenol by 162.24% with respect to the control. TGA analysis showed an increase in the maximum thermal decomposition temperature (Tmax) in treated o-aminophenol (178.17ºC) with respect to the control (175ºC). It may be inferred that the thermal stability of o-aminophenol increased after the biofield treatment. The surface area analysis using BET showed a substantial decrease in the surface area of the treated sample by 47.1% as compared to the control. The FT-IR analysis showed no changes in the absorption peaks of the treated sample with respect to the control. UV-visible analysis showed alteration in the absorption peaks i.e. 211→203 nm and 271→244 nm of the treated o-aminophenol as compared to the control. Overall, the results showed that the biofield treatment caused an alteration in the physical, thermal and spectral properties of the treated o-aminophenol.
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ISSN: 2153-2435
Trivedi et al., Pharm Anal Acta 2015, 6:10
http://dx.doi.org/10.4172/2153-2435.1000425
Volume 6 • Issue 10 • 1000425
Pharm Anal Acta
ISSN: 2153-2435 PAA, an open access journal
Abstract
O-aminophenol has extensive uses as a conducting material and in electrochemical devices. The objective
of this research was to investigate the inuence of bioeld energy treatment on the physical thermal and spectral
properties of o-aminophenol. The study was performed in two groups; the control group was remained as untreated,
while the treated group was subjected to Mr. Trivedi’s bioeld energy treatment. Subsequently, the control and
treated o-aminophenol samples were characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD), Differential scanning calorimetry
(DSC), Thermogravimetric analysis (TGA), surface area analysis, Fourier transform infrared (FT-IR) spectroscopy,
and Ultra violet-visible spectroscopy analysis (UV-vis). The XRD analysis showed an increase in peak intensity of
the treated o-aminophenol with respect to the control. Additionally, the crystallite size of the treated o-aminophenol
was increased by 34.51% with respect to the control sample. DSC analysis showed a slight increase in the melting
temperature of the treated sample as compared to the control. However, a signicant increase in the latent heat of
fusion was observed in the treated o-aminophenol by 162.24% with respect to the control. TGA analysis showed
an increase in the maximum thermal decomposition temperature (Tmax) in treated o-aminophenol (178.17ºC) with
respect to the control (175ºC). It may be inferred that the thermal stability of o-aminophenol increased after the
bioeld treatment. The surface area analysis using BET showed a substantial decrease in the surface area of the
treated sample by 47.1% as compared to the control. The FT-IR analysis showed no changes in the absorption
peaks of the treated sample with respect to the control. UV-visible analysis showed alteration in the absorption peaks
i.e. 211→203 nm and 271→244 nm of the treated o-aminophenol as compared to the control. Overall, the results
showed that the bioeld treatment caused an alteration in the physical, thermal and spectral properties of the treated
o-aminophenol.
Characterization of Physical, Thermal and Spectral Properties of Biofield
Treated
O
-Aminophenol
Snehasis Jana1*, Mahendra Kumar Trivedi1, Rama Mohan Tallapragada1, Alice Branton1, Dahryn Trivedi1, Gopal Nayak1 and Rakesh Kumar
Mishra2
1Trivedi Global Inc., 10624 S Eastern Avenue Suite A-969, Henderson, NV 89052, USA
2Trivedi Science Research Laboratory Pvt. Ltd., Hall-A, Chinar Mega Mall, Chinar Fortune City, Hoshangabad Rd., Bhopal- 462026, Madhya Pradesh, India
Keywords: Bioeld energy treatment; o-aminophenol; X-ray
diraction; Dierential scanning calorimetry; ermogravimetric
analysis; Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy; UV-visible analysis
Abbreviations: XRD: X-Ray Diraction; DSC: Dierential Scanning
Calorimetry; TGA: ermogravimetric Analysis; DTA: Dierential
ermal Analysis; DTG: Derivative ermogravimetry; FT-IR: Fourier
Transform Infrared; CAM: Complementary and Alternative Medicine
Introduction
Conducting materials have received signicant scientic and
technological interest in recent years. Aniline based compounds and
polymers have grabbed special attention as a base material for the
synthesis of conducting devices [1]. Aminophenol based compounds
are especially interesting as electrochemical materials since, unlike
anilines [2] and other derivatives [3], they have two groups (-NH2
and –OH) which can be oxidized. Hence, they show excellent
electrochemical nature similar to anilines [3,4] and phenols [5,6].
Recently, 4-aminophenol was utilized as the material for fabricating
electrochemical immunosensor and electrode for determining the
amount of aminophenol present in water and pharmaceuticals [7].
Mascaro et al. synthesized poly aniline/o-aminophenol copolymer in a
chloride medium and proposed that it could be used for polymer-based
light emitting diodes [8]. Tucceri reported that in o-aminophenol, the
presence of an electron donating –OH group next to imine nitrogen
increases the electron density at imine sites. Additionally, the –OH itself
is a potential coordinating site, which could be utilized for fabricating
stable electrocatalysts for oxygen reduction [9]. However, lower thermal
and environmental stability of organic materials hampers their uses as
conducting materials [10,11]. Hence, some alternative strategy should
be designed in order to improve the stability and thermal resistance
*Corresponding author: Trivedi Global Inc., 10624 S Eastern Avenue Suite
A-969, Henderson, NV 89052, USA, Tel: +91-755-6660006; E-mail: publication@
trivedisrl.com
Received August 27 , 2015; Accepted September 11, 2015; Published September
15, 2015
Citation: Trivedi MK, Tallapragada RM, Branton A, Trivedi D, Nayak G, et al.(2015)
Characterization of Physical, Thermal and Spectral Properties of Bioeld Treated
O-Aminophenol. Pharm Anal Acta 6: 425. doi:10.4172/21532435.1000425
Copyright: © 2015 Trivedi MK, et al. This is an open-access article distributed
under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits un-
restricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original
author and source are credited.
of conducting organic materials. Recently, bioeld treatment was used
as a strategy to alter the physicochemical properties of metals [12,13],
ceramics [14] and organic product [15]. Hence, aer considering the
above-mentioned properties of o-aminophenol, authors planned to
investigate the impact of bioeld treatment on physical, thermal and
spectral properties of o-aminophenol.
e National Center for Complementary and Alternative Medicine
(NCCAM), a part of the National Institute of Health (NIH), recommends
the use of Complementary and Alternative Medicine (CAM) therapies
as an alternative to the healthcare sector and about 36% of Americans
regularly uses some form of CAM [16]. CAM includes numerous
energy-healing therapies; bioeld therapy is a type of putative energy
medicine used in the holistic medicine medical system and is being
used worldwide to improve the overall health and well-being of
humans. Researchers have experimentally demonstrated the presence
of an electromagnetic eld around the human body using well-known
medical technologies such as electromyography, electrocardiography,
Page 2 of 6
Volume 6 • Issue 10 • 1000425
Pharm Anal Acta
ISSN: 2153-2435 PAA, an open access journal
Citation: Trivedi MK, Tallapragada RM, Branton A, Trivedi D, Nayak G, et al.(2015) Characterization of Physical, Thermal and Spectral Properties of
Bioeld Treated O-Aminophenol. Pharm Anal Acta 6: 425. doi:10.4172/21532435.1000425
Where, Gc and Gt are crystallite size of control and treated powder
samples respectively.
Dierential scanning calorimetry (DSC)
DSC was used to investigate the melting temperature and latent
heat of fusion (∆H) of samples. e control and treated o-aminophenol
samples were analyzed using a Pyris-6 Perkin Elmer DSC at a heating
rate of 10ºC/min under air atmosphere and the air was ushed at a ow
rate of 5 mL/min. Predetermined amount of sample was kept in an
aluminum pan and closed with a lid. A blank aluminum pan was used
as a reference. Percentage change in latent heat of fusion was calculated
using following equations:
[ ]
% change in 100
Treated Control
Control
SS
Surface area S
= ×
Where, ΔH Control and ΔH Treated are the latent heat of fusion of control
and treated samples, respectively.
ermogravimetric analysis-dierential thermal analysis
(TGA-DTA)
ermal stability of control and treated o-aminophenol were
analyzed by using Mettler Toledo simultaneous TGA and Dierential
thermal analyzer (DTA). e samples were heated from room
temperature to 400ºC with a heating rate of 5ºC/min under air
atmosphere.
Surface area analysis
Surface area of o-aminophenol were characterized by surface
area analyzer, SMART SORB 90 Brunauer-Emmett-Teller (BET)
using ASTM D 5604 method which had a detection range of 0.2-1000
m2/g. Percent changes in surface area were calculated using following
equation:
[ ]
% change in 100
Treated Control
Control
SS
Surface area S
= ×
Where, S Control and S Treated are the surface area of control and treated
samples respectively.
FT-IR spectroscopy
FT-IR spectra were recorded on Shimadzu’s Fourier transform
infrared spectrometer (Japan) with frequency range of 4000-500
cm-1. e analysis was accomplished to evaluate the eect of bioeld
treatment at atomic level like dipole moment, force constant and bond
strength in chemical structure [26]. e treated sample was divided
into two parts T1 and T2 for FT-IR analysis.
UV-Vis spectroscopic analysis
UV spectra of control and treated o-aminophenol samples were
recorded on Shimadzu UV-2400 PC series spectrophotometer with 1
cm quartz cell and a slit width of 2.0 nm. e analysis was carried out
using wavelength in the range of 200-400 nm and methanol was used as
solvent. e UV spectra was analyzed to determine the eect of bioeld
treatment on the energy gap of highest occupied molecular orbital and
lowest unoccupied molecular orbital (HOMO–LUMO gap) [26]. e
treated sample was divided in two parts T1 and T2 for the analysis.
Results and Discussion
XRD study
XRD diractogram of the control and treated o-aminophenol are
shown in Figure 1. XRD diractogram of the control sample showed
and the electroencephalogram [17]. Additionally, it also showed that
bioelectricity generated from the heart, brain functions or due to the
motion of charged particles such as protons, electrons, and ions in the
human body [18]. us, the human body emits electromagnetic waves
in the form of bio-photons, which surrounds the body, i.e., commonly
known as a bioeld. erefore, a human has the ability to harness the
energy from the environment/Universe and then transmit it to any
object (living or non-living) around the globe. e object(s) always
receive the energy and respond into a useful way. is energy is called
bioeld energy, and this process is referred to as bioeld treatment.
Mr. Trivedi’s unique bioeld energy treatment is also known
as e Trivedi Eect®. is bioeld treatment is known to alter the
characteristics of many living organisms and nonliving materials
in various research elds such as agriculture research [19,20] and
biotechnology research [21]. Bioeld treatment has shown excellent
results in improving the antimicrobial susceptibility pattern,
alteration of biochemical reactions, as well as induced alterations
in the characteristics of pathogenic microbes [22,23]. Exposure
to bioeld treatment caused paramount increase in the medicinal
property, growth, and anatomical characteristics of ashwagandha [24].
Moreover, bioeld treatment has been used as an excellent strategy for
the modication of spectral properties of various pharmaceutical drugs
like paracetamol and piroxicam [25].
Aer considering the above-mentioned excellent results obtained
through bioeld treatments, this work was undertaken to evaluate
the impact of bioeld treatment on the physical, thermal and spectral
properties of o-aminophenol.
Materials and Methods
O-aminophenol was procured from SD Fine Chemicals Limited,
India. e sample was divided into two parts; one was kept as a control
sample while the other was subjected to Mr. Trivedi’s unique bioeld
treatment and coded as the treated sample. e treated group was kept
in a sealed pack and handed over to Mr. Trivedi for bioeld treatment
under controlled laboratory conditions. Mr. Trivedi provided the
treatment through his energy transmission process to the treated group
without touching the sample. e control and treated samples were
characterized by XRD, DSC, TGA, surface area analysis, FT-IR, and
UV-visible analysis.
Characterization
X-ray diraction (XRD) study
XRD analysis of the control and treated o-aminophenol was carried
out on Phillips, Holland PW 1710 X-ray diractometer system, which
had a copper anode with nickel lter. e radiation of wavelength
used by the XRD system was 1.54056 Å. e data obtained from this
XRD were in the form of a chart of 2θ vs. intensity and a detailed
table containing peak intensity counts, d value (Å), peak width (θ°),
relative intensity (%) etc. e crystallite size (G) was calculated by using
formula:
G = kλ/(bCosθ)
Here, λ is the wavelength of radiation used, b is full width half-
maximum (FWHM) of peaks and k is the equipment constant (=0.94).
e percentage change in crystallite size was calculated using following
formula:
Percentage change in crystallite size = [(Gt-Gc)/Gc] ×100
Page 3 of 6
Volume 6 • Issue 10 • 1000425
Pharm Anal Acta
ISSN: 2153-2435 PAA, an open access journal
Citation: Trivedi MK, Tallapragada RM, Branton A, Trivedi D, Nayak G, et al.(2015) Characterization of Physical, Thermal and Spectral Properties of
Bioeld Treated O-Aminophenol. Pharm Anal Acta 6: 425. doi:10.4172/21532435.1000425
crystalline peaks at 2θ equal to 17.93º, 18.73º, 18.87º, 26.04º, and
45.85º. However, the XRD of treated sample showed intense peaks at
2θ equal to 17.92º, 18.68º, 18.87º, 26.15º and 45.88º. e result showed
a substantial increase in the intensity of few XRD peaks at 2θ equal
to 17.92º, 18.87º and 45.88º in treated o-aminophenol with respect to
control. e increase in the intensity of the XRD peak may be due to
increase in a long-range symmetrical pattern of treated o-aminophenol
molecules that lead to the enhanced crystallinity of the sample.
Crystallite size was calculated using the Scherrer formula (crystallite
size = kλ /b cos θ) and the results are presented in Figure 2. e crystallite
size of control o-aminophenol was 78.32 nm, and it was increased
signicantly to 105.35 nm in the treated sample. e percentage increase
in crystallite size was 34.51% in treated o-aminophenol with respect
to the control. It was reported previously that increase in annealing
temperature signicantly aects the crystallite size of the materials.
e increase in temperature causes decrease in dislocation density
and increase in number of unit cell that ultimately causes an increase
in crystallite size [27,28]. It is hypothesized that bioeld treatment
may provide some thermal energy that possibly cause a reduction in
dislocation density and increase in number of unit cell and crystallite
size of the treated o-aminophenol as compared to the control.
DSC study
DSC thermogram of the control and treated samples are presented
in Figure 3. DSC thermogram of the control o-aminophenol showed
the presence of an endothermic sharp inection at 176.07ºC, which
was due to melting temperature of the sample. However, the treated
o-aminophenol showed an endothermic peak at 176.75ºC, which
corresponded to melting temperature of the treated sample. is
showed the slight change in the melting temperature of treated
o-aminophenol with respect to control. It was previously reported that
intermolecular hydrogen bonding increases the melting point of the
compounds [29]. Hence, it is assumed that the bioeld treatment might
increase the hydrogen bonding in treated o-aminophenol that leads to
increasing in melting temperature of the sample.
e latent heat of fusion was obtained from the respective
thermogram of control and treated o-aminophenol and data are
presented in Table 1. e control o-aminophenol showed a latent heat
of fusion of 262.5 J/g and it was signicantly increased to 688.37 J/g
in treated sample. e result showed 162.24% increase in latent heat
of fusion in the treated o-aminophenol as compared to control. It was
previously reported that amount of thermal energy employed in phase
change from solid to the liquid state of the unit mass of material is
known as latent heat of fusion (∆H). It is hypothesized that bioeld
treatment of treated o-aminophenol may cause absorption of more
energy during the phase transition from solid to the liquid that might
lead to increasing in latent heat of fusion with respect to the control
sample.
TGA-DTA analysis
TGA was conducted to investigate the thermal stability of the
control and treated o-aminophenol. TGA thermogram of the control
and treated o-aminophenol are depicted in Figure 4. TGA thermogram
of the control o-aminophenol showed a one-step thermal degradation
pattern. e thermal degradation started at around 161ºC and
terminated at around 194ºC. During this event, the control sample
lost about 48.39% of its initial weight. On the other hand the treated
o-aminophenol also displayed one-step thermal degradation pattern.
e treated sample started losing weight around 158ºC, and this process
terminated at around 212ºC. During this event, the treated sample lost
around 55.98% of its initial weight.
DTA thermogram of the control and treated o-aminophenol are
shown in Figure 4. DTA thermogram of the control o-aminophenol
showed an endothermic peak at 176.09ºC, which corresponded to its
melting temperature. However the treated o-aminophenol displayed
an endothermic peak at 176.92ºC, due to the melting temperature of
the treated sample. is showed a slight change in melting temperature
of the treated o-aminophenol that was well supported by DSC analysis.
DTG thermogram of the control and treated o-aminophenol are
shown in Figure 4. e DTG thermogram of control o-aminophenol
showed a maximum thermal decomposition temperature (Tmax) at
Figure 1: XRD diffractogram of control and treated o-aminophenol.
0
20
40
60
80
100
Control Treated
Crystallite size (nm)
Figure 2: Crystallite size of control and treated o-aminophenol.
Page 4 of 6
Volume 6 • Issue 10 • 1000425
Pharm Anal Acta
ISSN: 2153-2435 PAA, an open access journal
Citation: Trivedi MK, Tallapragada RM, Branton A, Trivedi D, Nayak G, et al.(2015) Characterization of Physical, Thermal and Spectral Properties of
Bioeld Treated O-Aminophenol. Pharm Anal Acta 6: 425. doi:10.4172/21532435.1000425
Surface area analysis
e surface area was investigated for the control and treated
o-aminophenol using BET method and results are presented in
Figure 5. e control o-aminophenol showed surface area of 0.3845
m2/g and it was decreased signicantly to 0.2034 m2/g in the treated
o-aminophenol. e result showed 47.1% decrease in surface area of
the treated o-aminophenol with respect to the control. It is assumed
that bioeld treatment may induce disappearance of internal
boundaries of particles that led to aggregation and increase in particle
size. Presumably this increase in particle size might lead to a decrease
in surface area of the treated samples.
FT-IR spectroscopy
FT-IR spectra of the control and treated o-aminophenol (T1
and T2) are presented in Figure 6. FT-IR spectrum of the control
o-aminophenol showed characteristic absorption peaks at 3304-
3375 cm-1 due to hydrogen bonded –OH/-NH stretching vibrations.
Vibration peaks at 2991-3020 cm-1 were due to –CH stretching
vibration peaks in the control sample. e absorption peak at 1604 cm-1
was due to N-H bending of aromatic amine and C=C group stretching.
Absorption peak at 1512 cm-1 was due to C-C in ring stretching
vibration peak. Vibration peaks for C-O were observed at 1031-1085
cm-1 and C-N stretching peaks were observed at 1269-1282 cm-1.
FT-IR spectrum of the treated o-aminophenol (T1) showed
absorption bands at 3306-3375 cm-1 that corresponded to phenolic –
OH/–NH stretching vibration peaks. –CH stretching vibration peaks
were observed at 2989-3022 cm-1 in the T1 sample. Vibration peak
for N-H- bending and typical C=C stretching were observed at 1604
cm-1. Absorption peak at 1512 cm-1 was due to C-C in ring stretching
vibration peak. Vibration peaks for C-O and C-N stretching were
observed at 1085-1031 cm-1 and 1269-1282 cm-1, respectively.
Whereas, the FT-IR spectrum of o-aminophenol (T2) showed
–OH/-NH stretching vibration peaks at 3306-3377 cm-1. e –CH
stretching vibration peaks were observed at 2989-3022 cm-1 in the T2
sample. Vibration peak at 1604 cm-1 was due to N-H bending and C=C
ring stretching. Absorption peak at 1512 cm-1 was due to C-C in ring
stretching vibration peak. C-O and C-N stretching vibration peaks
were observed at 1031-1085 cm-1 and 1269-1282 cm-1, respectively.
e FT-IR peaks were well supported by literature data [31]. Overall,
the FT-IR results showed no changes in absorption peak of the treated
o-aminophenol with respect to the control sample.
UV-visible spectroscopy
UV spectra of the control and treated sample are presented in
Figure 7. e UV spectrum of control o-aminophenol showed three
absorption peaks, i.e., 291, 271, and 211 nm. Contrarily, the UV
spectrum of the treated o-aminophenol (T1) showed two absorption
peaks, i.e., 247 and 206 nm. Whereas, the treated o-aminophenol (T2)
showed three absorption peaks at 295, 244 and 203 nm. It was reported
that absorption peaks between 210-290 nm were mainly due to n→ π*
and π - π* transition of the aromatic rings [29]. e result showed a
downward shi of 211 nm absorption peak of the control sample to
203 nm in the treated o-aminophenol (T2) sample. Additionally a
signicant shi in UV absorption 271→244 nm was observed in the
treated o-aminophenol (T2) sample with respect to the control. e
alteration in UV absorption peaks in the treated o-aminophenol
(T2) was due to the transition of electron i.e. bonding (n→ π* and
π→π* transition) from the ground state to excited state. erefore,
it is hypothesized that bioeld treatment may cause an alteration in
Parameter Control Treated
Latent heat of fusion ΔH (J/g) 262.50 688.37
Melting temperature (ºC) 176.07 176.75
Tmax (ºC) 175.00 178.17
Weight loss (%) 48.39 55.98
Table 1: Thermal analysis data of control and treated o-aminophenol.
Figure 3: DSC thermogram of control and treated o-aminophenol.
175ºC. Nevertheless, the treated o-aminophenol showed an increase in
Tmax temperature and it was observed at 178.17ºC. is increase in Tmax
of treated o-aminophenol may be inferred as an increase in thermal
stability as compared to the control sample.
According to Boltzman law of energy distribution among molecules
at any temperature a portion of molecules will possess energy higher
than the bond energy.
K=Ae-E/RT
Where, A is the frequency factor related to the vibration frequency
of a critical mode of vibration in molecules, and E is the excess energy
that must be concentrated in the molecule to decompose it. K is the
rate of decomposition. It was reported that A should be minimized to
increase the thermal stability of the organic compounds [30]. Hence,
it is assumed that the bioeld treatment may be acted on the treated
o-aminophenol and minimized the frequency of critical mode of
vibration of molecules that leads to increase the thermal stability of
treated sample with respect to control. erefore the high thermal
stability of treated o-aminophenol could improve its application as
conducting materials.
Page 5 of 6
Volume 6 • Issue 10 • 1000425
Pharm Anal Acta
ISSN: 2153-2435 PAA, an open access journal
Citation: Trivedi MK, Tallapragada RM, Branton A, Trivedi D, Nayak G, et al.(2015) Characterization of Physical, Thermal and Spectral Properties of
Bioeld Treated O-Aminophenol. Pharm Anal Acta 6: 425. doi:10.4172/21532435.1000425
Figure 4: TGA thermogram of control and treated o-aminophenol. Figure 6: FT-IR spectra of control and treated (T1 and T2) o-aminophenol.
Figure 7: UV visible spectra of control and treated (T1 and T2) o-aminophenol.
0
0.05
0.1
0.15
0.2
0.25
0.3
0.35
0.4
Control Treated
Surface area (m2/g)
Figure 5: Surface area of control and treated o-aminophenol.
bonding electron transition of the treated sample with respect to the
control.
Conclusion
e XRD analysis showed an increase in the intensity of peaks in
the treated o-aminophenol with respect to the control. e crystallite
size signicantly increased in the treated compound as compared to
the control o-aminophenol. e bioeld treatment may have caused
a reduction in the dislocation density and an increase in unit cell that
led to the increase in crystallite size. DSC and DTA showed a change in
the melting temperature of the treated compound with respect to the
control. A substantial increase in the latent heat of fusion was observed
in the treated o-aminophenol by 162.24% aer receiving the bioeld
treatment with respect to the control. TGA analysis showed an increase
in the thermal stability of the treated compound as compared to the
Page 6 of 6
Volume 6 • Issue 10 • 1000425
Pharm Anal Acta
ISSN: 2153-2435 PAA, an open access journal
Citation: Trivedi MK, Tallapragada RM, Branton A, Trivedi D, Nayak G, et al.(2015) Characterization of Physical, Thermal and Spectral Properties of
Bioeld Treated O-Aminophenol. Pharm Anal Acta 6: 425. doi:10.4172/21532435.1000425
control. Surface area analysis showed a substantial decrease in the
surface area of the treated o-aminophenol as compared to the control.
FT-IR analysis showed no signicant changes in the FT-IR spectra of
the treated sample as compared to the control. However, the UV-visible
analysis showed alterations in the bonding π - π* transition in the
aromatic ring of the treated sample with respect to the control. Overall,
the results demonstrated that the bioeld treatment inuenced the
physical, thermal and spectral properties of the treated o-aminophenol.
Hence, the high thermal stability of the treated o-aminophenol could
make it a potential candidate for the fabrication of electrochemical and
conducting devices.
Acknowledgement
The authors would like to thank Trivedi Science, Trivedi Master Wellness and
Trivedi Testimonials for their support during this research work. Authors would also
like to thanks the whole team from the MGV pharmacy college, Nashik for providing
the instrumental facility.
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Citation: Trivedi MK, Tallapragada RM, Branton A, Trivedi D, Nayak
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doi:10.4172/21532435.1000425
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