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COURSERA ONLINE COURSE: A PLATFORM FOR ENGLISH TEACHERS’ MEANINGFUL AND VIBRANT PROFESSIONAL DEVELOPMENT

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p>This article reports on English teachers‘ attitudes towards a professional development program run by Coursera (coursera.org). These teachers were participants of Foundation of Teaching for Learning 1: Introduction online course. Using a survey case study, the findings reveal that most of the participants perceive the course as a well-organized and effective platform to engage in professional learning. Coursera is an online learning platform offering various courses for teacher educators which are meaningful (closely related to their daily teaching practice) and vibrant (involves active collaboration among peer participants to review and assess their projects). Albeit this nature, another finding shows that the participants lament that their institutions do not provide professional development (PD) support. In fact, PD programs are not constrained to face-to-face encounters, since it can be designed using online platforms such as Coursera, a massive open online course (MOOC). Accordingly, the contribution of the article is to show how online platforms make meaningful and vibrant teacher professional development (TPD) possible. The implication of the study is that school administrators and policy makers should provide support for their teachers to take online PD programs. This professional learning should contribute to the best teaching practice and student learning attainment. </p
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... Most of OPD studies have been carried out internationally (e.g. Murugaiah et al., 2010;Kabilan, Adlina, & Embi, 2011, Magidin de Kramer et al., 2012Liu, 2012;Silvia, 2015;Alimirzaee & Ashraf, 2016;McCall, 2018). Nevertheless, few studies have been conducted in some of the Arab countries, and they focused on the use of the internet by EFL teachers (e.g. ...
... There are many studies have been conducted to examine the different forms of OPD for English language (EL) teachers (e.g. Elmabruk, 2009;Kabilan & Rajab, 2010;Murugaiah et al., 2010;Kabilan, Adlina, & Embi, 2011, Magidin de Kramer et al., 2012Liu, 2012;Silvia, 2015;Alimirzaee & Ashraf, 2016;McCall, 2018). ...
... On the other hand, Silvia (2015) examined EL teachers' attitudes from different contexts (India, Russia, Brazil, Italia, USA, Indonesia, and Turkey) towards OPD courses provided by the Coursera platform. Teachers' attitudes were examined based on the five levels of information that identified by Guskey (2000); (1) participants' reactions, (2) participants' learning, (3) organization support and change, (4) participants' use of new knowledge and skills, and (5) student learning outcomes. ...
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... Teachers noted a variety of approaches to addressing this issue during one of the interviews, including attending MALL seminars, searching for information about MALL on the internet, and reading journal articles that cover pertinent subjects. Online teacher professional development (TPD), such as online courses, can give a platform for teachers to realize their full potentials while also increasing their involvement in the programs they are involved with (Silvia, 2015) because teachers are demanded to continuously develop their competence through professional development endeavors (Puspitasari et al., 2021). ...
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