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Caffeine intake is related to successful weight loss maintenance

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Abstract

The effect of caffeine intake on weight loss maintenance has not been examined in humans. We compared the daily consumption of coffee and caffeinated beverages between 494 weight loss maintainers and 2129 individuals from the general population controlling for sociodemographic variables, body mass index and physical activity level. Weight loss maintainers reported to consume significantly more cups of coffee and caffeinated beverages compared with the participants in the general population sample. Thus, consumption of caffeinated beverages might support weight loss maintenance. Further studies should investigate possible mechanisms.European Journal of Clinical Nutrition advance online publication, 11 November 2015; doi:10.1038/ejcn.2015.183.
... Creatine and Zn combination as a supplement might merit future development after the necessary number of studies. Yes [70] human (healthy) Yes [64] No [61] Caffeine No [107] human Yes [107] human No [68] animal Yes [68] animal No [108] human Yes [108] human Yes [109] human Yes [110] animal ...
... Creatine and Zn combination as a supplement might merit future development after the necessary number of studies. Yes [70] human (healthy) Yes [64] No [61] Caffeine No [107] human Yes [107] human No [68] animal Yes [68] animal No [108] human Yes [108] human Yes [109] human Yes [110] animal ...
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To assess and to evaluate possible effects arising from Web-based data collection on the results of a study. We analyzed participants of the German Weight Control Registry (GWCR) of whom 328 chose to use Web-based questionnaires and 139 preferred to participate via a traditional postal survey. Furthermore, we included data of 212 individuals sampled independently from the general population who fulfilled the study's inclusion criteria-giving us the chance to differentiate between response bias (concerning Web-based data collection) and general selection bias (concerning participation in the GWCR). In addition to selection bias (GWCR participants are overall better educated, more likely to live in a partnership, more often female, and older than the general population), we also found a substantial response bias: Participants using the Internet were younger, better educated, and more often male compared with participants preferring the paper-and-pencil version. However, after adjusting for these differences, we found no additional direct effect of Web-based data collection on any of the outcome variables. Web-based epidemiologic studies still do not attract the same participants as postal surveys, even in highly industrialized countries. However, after adjusting for this bias, the same results can be expected.