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Predicting the Use of Violence using Machine Learning Methods

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Predicting airline delays
  • Raj Bandyopadhyay
  • Rafael Guerrero
RaJ Bandyopadhyay and Rafael Guerrero. Predicting airline delays. http://cs229. stanford. edu/proj2012/BandyopadhyayGuerrero- PredictingFlightDelays. pdf (2012).
http://www.transtats.bts.gov/DL_SelectFields.asp?Table_ID=236&DB_Short_Name=On-Time rticle
Bureau of Transformation Statistics, http://www.transtats.bts.gov/DL_SelectFields.asp?Table_ID=236&DB_Short_Name=On-Time rticle. J SciCommun2000; 163:51-9.