ArticlePDF Available

Parental Involvement in Child's Education: Importance, Barriers and Benefits

Authors:

Abstract

This research article explicates the importance, barriers and benefits of parental involvement in child's education. The authors exemplify the fact that parents' involvement in their child's learning process offers many opportunities for success-improvements on child's morale, attitude, and academic achievement across all subject areas, behavior and social adjustment (Centre for Child Well-Being, 2010). This study underscores that the most common obstacle to parental participation is the parents' pessimistic attitude towards supporting school where their children are enrolled in, and the " we-don't-care-attitude " among parents. It further elucidates the truth about parents' role in the personal and academic performance of the child, as revealed by Conway and Houtenville's (2008) study, stating that " parental effort is consistently associated with higher levels of achievement, and the magnitude of the effect of parental effort is substantial. " Pinantoan (2013), Olsen (2010), and Henderson and Berla (1994) corroborate this contention and other claims on the importance and benefits of parental participation in the child's holistic development.
Asian Journal of Management Sciences & Education Vol. 3(2) April 2014
_____________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________
__________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________
________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________
______________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________
________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________
__________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________
__________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________
__________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________
_____________________________________________________________________________________________________________________
ISSN: 2186-845X ISSN: 2186-8441 Print
www.ajmse. leena-luna.co.jp
Leena and Luna International, Oyama, Japan. Copyright © 2014
() リナアンドルナインターナショナル, 小山市、日本
P a g e | 42
Parental Involvement in Child’s Education: Importance,
Barriers and Benefits
Gina Madrigal Sapungan, Ronel Mondragon Sapungan
1 Principal III, Calapan South District Division of Calapan City, PHILIPPINES,
2 Department of Languages and Literature, AMA International University, Bahrain,
KINGDOM OF BAHRAIN.
1 Gina.sapungan@yahoo.com,2 rmsapungan@amaiu.edu.bh; dr.ronel192025@gmail.com
ABSTRACT
This research article explicates the importance, barriers and benefits of
parental involvement in child’s education. The authors exemplify the fact that
parents’ involvement in their child’s learning process offers many
opportunities for success- improvements on child’s morale, attitude, and
academic achievement across all subject areas, behavior and social
adjustment (Centre for Child Well-Being, 2010). This study underscores that
the most common obstacle to parental participation is the parents’ pessimistic
attitude towards supporting school where their children are enrolled in, and
the “we-don’t-care-attitude” among parents. It further elucidates the truth
about parents’ role in the personal and academic performance of the child, as
revealed by Conway and Houtenville’s (2008) study, stating that parental
effort is consistently associated with higher levels of achievement, and the
magnitude of the effect of parental effort is substantial.” Pinantoan (2013),
Olsen (2010), and Henderson and Berla (1994) corroborate this contention
and other claims on the importance and benefits of parental participation in
the child’s holistic development.
Keywords: parental involvement, child education, importance, barriers and
benefits
INTRODUCTION
"We need to begin with the firm belief that all parents are interested in the development and
progress of their own children" -Pen Green, Centre for Under Fives and Families
Parental involvement has always been an essential component of every teacher-student-
school academic endeavor. Parents, who have been considered as one of the stakeholders of
the school community, play tremendous roles in the child’s educational and environmental
transformation; thus, the intensity or extent of participation that parents have in their child’s
education and school, more often, have to be realized.
Many parents, whose children are currently enrolled in a particular school, are enormously
concerned, more often being active to assist in their child’s classroom, communicating
constantly with their child’s teachers, assisting with their homework, getting involved with
school projects, and discussing their child’s individual academic strengths and weaknesses
with teachers. Regrettably, there are also some, if not many, parents who are quite passive in
their child’s education. Some of them are not directly involved. Sadly speaking, some parents
have obvious manifestations of their “I-don’t-care” attitude. Neither are they visible in the
school premises and get involved in the desired goals of the school where their children are
getting what they need most for life.
Asian Journal of Management Sciences & Education Vol. 3(2) April 2014
_____________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________
__________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________
__________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________
__________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________
__________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________
__________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________
__________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________
__________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________
___________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________
____________
______
Copyright © 2014 Leena and Luna International, Oyama, Japan.
43 | P a g e () リナアンドルナインターナショナル, 小山市、日本.
ISSN: 2186-845X ISSN: 2186-8441 Pri nt
www.ajmse. leena-luna.co.jp
Several schools, both private and public sectors, have programs designed at intensifying
parental participation such as boys and girls scouting, school-community socio-economic
projects, disaster volunteer task force, and school-community work brigade. However,
increasing parental involvement remains a tough challenge among school administrators and
their teachers despite clear programs, concerted efforts, and strong motivations.
Importance of Parental Involvement
Why do parents have to get involved in their child’s education? Basically, parents’
involvement in their child’s learning process offers many opportunities for success.
According to Centre for Child Well-Being (2010), parental involvement in their children’s
learning not only improves a child’s morale, attitude, and academic achievement across all
subject areas, but it also promotes better behavior and social adjustment. It further says that
family involvement in education helps children to grow up to be productive, responsible
members of the society. This means that if we involve the parents in educating their children,
it is tantamount to saying that the school is proactive in implementing changes or
development among the students. As parent’s involvement is increased, teachers and school
administrators also raise the chance to realize quality reform in education.
In the research conducted by Mapp K. and Henderson, A. (2002) entitled A New Wave of
Evidence, The Impact of School, Family, and Community Connections on Student
Achievement, the authors state that “most students at all levels elementary, middle, and
high school – want their families to be more knowledgeable partners about schooling and are
willing to take active roles in assisting communications between home and school.” The
study further points out that “when parents come to school regularly, it reinforces the view in
the child's mind that school and home are connected and that school is an integral part of the
whole family's life.”
In his article on Parental Involvement in Education “Tips to Increase Parental Involvement in
Education,” Meador (2010) supported earlier contention stating that “true school reform will
always begin with increased parental involvement in their children’s education. It has been
proven time and time again that parents who invest time and place value on their children’s
education will have children who are more successful in school.” There are always
exceptions, but teaching a child to value education brings a positive impact on their
education.
As a school administrator for almost a couple of decades, this author firmly agrees with the
thought that school administrators and teachers are continuously frustrated in an age where
parental involvement increasingly seems to be on the decline despite the effort exerted by the
school heads and teachers, and the Department of Education (DepEd) through its Orders and
memoranda in the local counterparts.
Unfortunately, a fraction of this disappointment rests on the fact that the community often
places sole blame on the teachers and school heads, when in reality, there is a natural
incapability if parents are not mindful of their obligations. For the past five years in the five
school districts, the author has often been observing, that some schools in a certain district is
influenced by parental involvement at a certain degree. The schools with more parental
involvement are almost always the higher performing schools both in academic and non-
academic undertakings. Consequently, the administration and the teachers have become more
motivated, more committed, and more active to support the initiatives of the parents.
Asian Journal of Management Sciences & Education Vol. 3(2) April 2014
_____________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________
__________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________
________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________
______________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________
________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________
__________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________
__________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________
__________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________
_____________________________________________________________________________________________________________________
ISSN: 2186-845X ISSN: 2186-8441 Print
www.ajmse. leena-luna.co.jp
Leena and Luna International, Oyama, Japan. Copyright © 2014
() リナアンドルナインターナショナル, 小山市、日本
P a g e | 44
Barriers to Parental Involvement
As mentioned earlier, school performance is tantamount to the degree or the extent of
parental involvement, thus, it is important to identify the roadblocks that create impact on
parent’s participation and the children’s proper education.
Important obstacles that constrain parents' ability to become actively involved in their
children's education include the teachers' attitudes and the parents’ family resources, among
others. These obstacles, however, can be overcome by the school and through teacher’s
orientation and training.
Based on the author’s personal observations and random interviews with her fellow school
administrators, the most common obstacle to parental participation is the parents’ pessimistic
attitude towards supporting school where their children are enrolled in. Many administrators
believe that this “we-don’t-care-attitude” among parents may be due to their inability to
understand their role in the success of their children and the incapability to support the school
academic undertakings. Some school administrators and teachers confirm the belief and
supported the contention that added to the malady is the parents’ lack of skills and resources
to support their children and the school.
Posted in National Center for School Engagement, Family Support America shared with its
readers the common barriers associated with increasing parental involvement in schools and
community programs, as follows:
1. Attitudes – Staff do not feel comfortable talking about issues in front of families.
Families don’t trust staff. Staff thinks families are too overwhelmed to participate.
Staff isn’t willing to accept families as equal partners. Families think they have
nothing to contribute. Staff thinks that families will violate client confidentiality.
2. Logistics – Schools and programs can’t pay for childcare. Transportation is
unavailable for families to get to meetings. Meetings are held only during working
hours – or at times inconvenient for parents. Families aren’t reimbursed for the time
they take off of work to attend meetings.
3. System barriers – No systems are in place for paying parent leaders for their time
and contributions. Staff time can only be paid during regular working hours. Lack of
resources available for supporting parent and family involvement.
4. Lacks of skills – Families have never participated in (school-type)
meetings/committees. Families are unaware of applicable procedures and policies.
Staff isn’t ready to work with families in new ways. Lack of information about the
role of families and staff.
To offer local schools and districts’ information and materials to expand parent and family
engagement in order to decrease the obstacles, if not totally eradicate, and to maximize
parental involvement, this article would wish to present this that may also help school
reshape parents’ and teachers’ notion on parental involvement in extensive yet simpler terms.
The National Center for School Engagement tried this model and found it very effective
based the self-made survey. This model is called Epstein’s Framework of Parent
Involvement. It is based on six types of parent involvement identified by Joyce Epstein from
the Center on School, Family and Community Partnerships. This author opts to share
Epstein’s Framework of How Parents Can Become More Involved in Schools as briefly
explained below.
1. Parenting – parenting skills are promoted and supported.
Asian Journal of Management Sciences & Education Vol. 3(2) April 2014
_____________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________
__________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________
__________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________
__________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________
__________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________
__________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________
__________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________
__________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________
___________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________
____________
______
Copyright © 2014 Leena and Luna International, Oyama, Japan.
45 | P a g e () リナアンドルナインターナショナル, 小山市、日本.
ISSN: 2186-845X ISSN: 2186-8441 Pri nt
www.ajmse. leena-luna.co.jp
2. Communication – communication between home and school is regular, two-way,
and meaningful.
3. Volunteering – parents are welcome in the school, and their support and assistance
are sought.
4. Learning at Home – help parents understand the educational process and their role in
supporting student achievement. Parents play an integral role in assisting student
learning.
5. School Decision-Making and Advocacy – parents are full partners in the decisions
that affect children and families. The intent is to give parents’ voice in decisions that
affect their children’s education.
6. Collaboration with the Community – community resources are used to strengthen
schools, families, and student learning.
The Benefits of Parental Involvement
This author firmly believes that parent-teacher partnership makes tremendous impact on
children’s education. Conversely, the strong collaboration of parents with school authorities
can create “tsunami of improvements” in both physical and academic performance of the
school. Hence, school administrators have to boldly encourage parents to get involved and
make “storm surge of contribution” to help achieve the school’s missions and goals.
In her article Working Together, Parent - Teacher Partnerships posted in the net recently,
Morin (2013) states that the best tip for school success is to make sure that parents and
teachers are working together as allies. Sometimes, though, it can seem that there’s a chalk
line drawn down the middle of your child’s life. At home, a parent knows best his own child
from head to toe - his academic potentials, social skills, innate attitude to mention a few,
while a teacher may know only a tip of an iceberg about who the child really is.
Academically, perhaps, a child’s potential may surface, as well as her social development
with peers. Home and school environment combined may create a fuller understanding of a
student; thus, a teacher can identify where to tap to benchmark a child’s performance level.
On academic achievement, Pinantoan (2013) pointed out the influence of parental
involvement on a student’s academic success should not be underestimated. The article
stressed the importance of support system that a student gets from home is equally important
as his brain power, work ethics and genetics which all work in the accomplishment of his
goal in life. Furthermore, students with two parents operating in supportive roles are 52%
more likely to enjoy school and get straight A’s than students whose parents are disengaged
with what’s going on at school. This is especially the case during the earliest years of
schooling, in Kindergarten through the 5th grade, when students with active parents are
almost twice as likely to succeed. Once students enter middle school, the effect diminishes
slightly—possibly because they are maturing during this time— but there is still a 22%
difference.
Corroborating this article on the benefits of parental involvement is the new research from the
University of New Hampshire which shows that students do much better in school when their
parents are actively involved in their education.
Researchers Karen Smith Conway, professor of economics at the University of New
Hampshire, and her colleague Andrew Houtenville, senior research associate at New Editions
Consulting, found that parental involvement has a strong, positive effect on student
achievement.
Asian Journal of Management Sciences & Education Vol. 3(2) April 2014
_____________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________
__________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________
________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________
______________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________
________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________
__________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________
__________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________
__________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________
_____________________________________________________________________________________________________________________
ISSN: 2186-845X ISSN: 2186-8441 Print
www.ajmse. leena-luna.co.jp
Leena and Luna International, Oyama, Japan. Copyright © 2014
() リナアンドルナインターナショナル, 小山市、日本
P a g e | 46
In their study "Parental Effort, School Resources, and Student Achievement,” Conway and
Houtenville (2008) reveal that “parental effort is consistently associated with higher levels of
achievement, and the magnitude of the effect of parental effort is substantial. We found that
schools would need to increase per-pupil spending by more than $1,000 in order to achieve
the same results that are gained with parental involvement.”
According to the study, the researchers also found out that parents seemed particularly
interested in the academic achievements of their daughters. They discovered parents spent
more time talking to their daughters about their school work during dinnertime discussions.
They also concluded that parents may reduce their efforts when school resources increase;
thus, diminishing the effects of improved school resources.
The abovementioned research used national data from more than 10,000 eighth-grade
students in public and private schools, their parents, teachers, and school administrators. The
researchers were particularly interested in how frequently parents discussed activities or
events of particular interest to the child, discussed things the child studied in class, discussed
selecting courses or programs at school, attended a school meeting, and volunteered at the
child's school.
Olsen (2010) proved that researchers have evidenced for the positive effects of parent
involvement on children, families, and school when schools and parents continuously support
and encourage the children's learning and development (Eccles& Harold, 1993; Illinois State
Board of Education, 1993). He quoted Henderson and Berla (1994), stating that "the most
accurate predictor of a student's achievement in school is not income or social status, but the
extent to which that student's family is able to: (1) Create a home environment that
encourages learning; (2) Express high (but not unrealistic) expectations for their children's
achievement and future careers; and (3) Become involved in their children's education at
school and in the community.”
According to Cotton, K., and Wikelund, K. of Northwest Regional Educational Laboratory,
School Improvement Research Series. In Parent Involvement in Education, “when parents get
involved earlier in a child’s educational process the more powerful the effects, and the most
effective forms of parent involvement are those, which engage parents in working directly
with their children on learning activities at home.”
In conclusion, this author deems it proper to cite other benefits of parent involvement that her
fellow parents and co-educators may find worth-pondering (Henderson and Berla, 1994)
research which reviewed and analyzed eighty-five studies that documented the
comprehensive benefits of parent involvement in children's education. This and other studies
show that parent involvement in activities that are effectively planned and well implemented
result in substantial benefits to children, parents, educators, and the school.
Benefits for the Children
I. Children tend to achieve more, regardless of ethnic or racial background,
socioeconomic status, or parents' education level.
II. Children generally achieve better grades, test scores, and attendance.
III. Children consistently complete their homework.
IV. Children have better self-esteem, are more self-disciplined, and show higher
aspirations and motivation toward school.
V. Children's positive attitude about school often results in improved behavior in school
and less suspension for disciplinary reasons.
Asian Journal of Management Sciences & Education Vol. 3(2) April 2014
_____________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________
__________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________
__________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________
__________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________
__________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________
__________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________
__________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________
__________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________
___________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________
____________
______
Copyright © 2014 Leena and Luna International, Oyama, Japan.
47 | P a g e () リナアンドルナインターナショナル, 小山市、日本.
ISSN: 2186-845X ISSN: 2186-8441 Pri nt
www.ajmse. leena-luna.co.jp
VI. Fewer children are being placed in special education and remedial classes.
VII. Children from diverse cultural backgrounds tend to do better when parents and
professionals work together to bridge the gap between the culture at home and the
culture in school.
VIII. Junior high and high school students whose parents remain involved usually make
better transitions and are less likely to drop out of school.
Benefits for the Parents
I. Parents increase their interaction and discussion with their children and are more
responsive and sensitive to their children's social, emotional, and intellectual
developmental needs.
II. Parents are more confident in their parenting and decision-making skills.
III. As parents gain more knowledge of child development, there is more use of
affection and positive reinforcement and less punishment on their children.
IV. Parents have a better understanding of the teacher's job and school curriculum.
V. When parents are aware of what their children are learning, they are more likely to
help when they are requested by teachers to become more involved in their
children's learning activities at home.
VI. When parents' perceptions of the school are improved, there are stronger ties and
commitment to the school.
VII. Parents are more aware of, and become more active regarding policies that affect
their children's education when parents are requested by the school to be part of the
decision-making team.
Benefits for the Educators
I. When schools have a high percentage of involved parents in and out of schools,
teachers and principals are more likely to experience higher morale.
II. Teachers and principals often earn greater respect for their profession from the
parents.
III. Consistent parent involvement leads to improved communication and relations
between parents, teachers, and administrators.
IV. Teachers and principals acquire a better understanding of families' cultures and
diversity, and they form deeper respect for parents' abilities and time.
V. Teachers and principals report an increase in job satisfaction.
Benefits for the School
I. Schools that actively involve parents and the community tend to establish better
reputations in the community.
II. Schools also experience better community support.
III. School programs that encourage and involve parents usually do better and have
higher quality programs than programs that do not involve parents.
Asian Journal of Management Sciences & Education Vol. 3(2) April 2014
_____________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________
__________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________
________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________
______________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________
________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________
__________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________
__________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________
__________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________
_____________________________________________________________________________________________________________________
ISSN: 2186-845X ISSN: 2186-8441 Print
www.ajmse. leena-luna.co.jp
Leena and Luna International, Oyama, Japan. Copyright © 2014
() リナアンドルナインターナショナル, 小山市、日本
P a g e | 48
REFERENCES
[1] Conway, K. S. (2008). Parental involvement strongly impacts student achievement,
New Research Finds. Retrieved January 01, 2014, from
http://www.teachthought.com/learning/the-effect-of-parental-involvement-on-
academic-achievement/
[2] Cotton, K., & Wikelund, K., Northwest Regional Educational Laboratory, School
Improvement Research Series. In Parent Involvement in Education.
[3] Epstein, J. L. of the Center on School, Family, and Community Partnerships at Johns
Hopkins University
[4] Olsen, G. (2010). The benefits of parent involvement: What research has to say, July
20, 2010. Retrieved January 01, 2014, from http://teaching.about.com/od/J-
Rteachingvocabulary/g/Parental-Involvement.htm
[5] Mapp, K., & Henderson, A. (2002).A New Wave of Evidence, The Impact of School,
Family, and Community Connections on Student Achievement
[6] Morin, A. (2013). Parents and teachers working together, parent - teacher
partnerships. Retrieved January 01, 2014, from
http://childparenting.about.com/od/schoollearning/a/parents-and-teachers-working-
together.htm
[7] Pinantoan, A. (2013). The Effect of Parental Involvement on Academic Achievement,
22 September 2013. Retrieved January 01, 2014, from
http://www.teachthought.com/learning/the-effect-of-parental-involvement-on-
academic-achievement/
[8] http://www.familyandparenting.org/our_work/All-Other-Subjects/Early-Home-
Learning-Matters/Practitioners-Section/Engaging+parents/Barriers-to-parental-
involvement
[9] http://www.unh.edu/news/cj_nr/2008/may/lw27parents.cfm
[10] http://www.njpirc.org/documents/resourcesEducatorsParentInvolvement/Roadblocks%
20and%20Detours.pdf
[11] http://www.schoolengagement.org/index.cfm/index.cfm/Parental%20Involvement%20in
%20Schools
[12] http://www.education.com/reference/article/benefits-parent-involvement-research/
... According to the Centre for Child Well-Being (cited in Sapungan and Sapungan 2014), parental involvement in their child's learning process offers many opportunities for success, such as the improvement of their child's academic achievement. Akomolafe and Adesua (2016) established a significant positive relationship between parental support and students' academic performance. ...
Article
Full-text available
This research sought to determine the role of parenting style and parental support in learners’ academic achievement in Physics within the theoretical framework of Coleman’s Social Capital Theory. A correlational research design was adopted and a sample of 335 senior secondary two learners was selected. Data were collected using a questionnaire on parental support and parenting style. A regression analysis was used to analyse the data. Results showed that parental support (r2 = 0.41) and parenting style (r2 = 0.16) play significant roles in learner performance in Physics. One of the implications of the findings is that poor parenting style and parental support will result in poor learner performance in Physics. It is recommended that adequate parental support should be provided to learners.
... The importance of parental involvement in children's education has frequently been debated; Centre for Child Well Being (2012) explains that parental involvement can encourage the learning and development of children. The involvement of parents too, can boost good behaviour amongst school children and reduce absenteeism (Sapungan & Sapungan, 2014;Malukeke, 2014). Therefore, this shows that the involvement of parents has led to an improved level of behavior among students. ...
... Child Trends [29] elucidates that parent involvement is lowest in families below the poverty line or with older children, as well as parents who do not speak the area's primary language or did not graduate high school. According to Sapungan and Sapunga [30], if parents are involved in educating their children, it is tantamount to saying that the school is proactive in implementing changes or development among the students. The more effective the involvement of parents in raising student performance, the stronger the foundation for the success of students and future opportunities for engagement, as elaborated from the cite Waterforg.com ...
Article
Full-text available
Parents play a vital role in increasing the performance and ensuring the good manners of their children in school. In the context of Indigenous People (IP), parental participation in educating their children is a meaningful involvement that benefits student learning directly. This study aims to determine the parental involvement of indigenous people in selected elementary schools in Northern Part of Mindanao, Philippines. The study specifically identified the profile of the IP parents, parents' contributory factors and involvement on the aspect of communication, learning at home, and financial support. The extent of parental involvement on the behavior of their children and significant relationship between respondents' profile were also measured. The study utilized a descriptive-quantitative method to explore how the IP parents extend their support to their children through survey, actual visitation and interview to validate the accuracy of the data gathered. Selected IP parents from IP elementary schools were surveyed using a researcher-made questionnaire as the main tool in the study. Data were analyzed using frequency counting, simple percentage, weighted mean, and Pearson R correlation. Original Research Article Cuartero-Enteria and Tagyam; AJARR, 13(2): 16-27, 2020; Article no.AJARR.60174 17 The IP parents fall to marginal classification in terms of educational background (45.83% are elementary undergraduate) with monthly income of less than fifteen thousand (less than the minimum wage). Regardless of race and background, IP parents' instincts are the same with common parents in supporting their children in school-related activities. However, issues on communication, learning at home, and financial support extended by IP parents to their children still need to be improved. In addition, parents' involvement influence academic endeavor of the students because they are given chances to enjoy the opportunity of free and supportive education. Thus, parents should constantly monitor the performance of their children at school to help them improve in their studies and build confidence to do better.
... Parental involvement as a factor of academic achievement demonstrates that parent involvement is positively related to expectations and importance of schooling and that by having a positive outlook toward education, a student is more likely to succeed (Porumbu & Necsoi, 2013). Furthermore, the involvement itself not only affects students' academic matters but also students' school attendance, and behavior (Sapungan, 2015). He further says that parental involvement in education helps children to grow up to be productive, responsible members of society. ...
Article
The reason why the writers conducted the research is to know the correlations among reading attitude, and motivation of urban students, and parental involvement towards their reading comprehension achievement of four private polytechnics in Palembang 2018/2019. In conducting the research, the writers used the method of quantitative-correlation. The sample was 99 students and the random sampling method was used. All the data were analyzed with Multiple Regression. The instrument to collect data in this research is the reading comprehension test comprising 40 questions in terms of multiple choices. The results show that (1) reading attitude has a positive influence towards reading comprehension achievement in which t1= 2.596, p-value = 0.011/2 = 0.0055 < 0.05, (2) reading motivation has a positive influence towards reading comprehension achievement in which t2= 4.658, p-value = 0.000/2 = 0 < 0.05, (3) parental involvement significantly influences students’ reading comprehension achievement in which t3= 6.21, p-value = 0.000/2 = 0 < 0.05, and (4) FCal is 31.189, p-value = 0.000 < 0.05 which imply that students’ reading attitude, students’ reading motivation, and parental involvement positively affect students’ reading comprehension achievement.
... How much parents get involved is impacted by the barriers that can restrict their efforts in trying to be involved. If teachers think that parents are less knowledgeable than they are, they may not think there can be meaningful collaboration with the parents and that itself could become another barrier to parental involvement (Mafa and Makuba 2013;Munroe and Brown 2011;Sapungan and Sapungan 2014). ...
Article
This research seeks to contextualise parental involvement in Jamaica based on data collected at the Grade One level from parents, teachers and principals. A sequential explanatory mixed methods design was employed in conducting the study in 10 primary schools. A total of 248 parents, 26 teachers and 5 principals were sampled. The findings suggest that parental empowerment and their efficacy beliefs are important features in determining their level of involvement. The invitation to be involved and how the invitation is made are critical to parents wanting to be involved. Personal, educational, social and school-related barriers impact their involvement. The findings reinforce the tripartite relationships between the family, school and children in improving parental involvement.
... Gina and Ronel underlined in their study that parents' involvement support their child to improve their morale, attitude, and academic achievement across all subject areas, behavior and social adjustment. 48 Therefore, communication and coordination between teacher and student's parent should be established well. Based on the interview between researchers and teacher, even though this theory has been applied, there are still students who must be assisted personally in learning.[] ...
Article
This study addressed to explore classroom management and Arabic Learning process based on Multiple intelligences theory implemented by the teacher. The study was a case study with descriptive qualitative approach. The data were collected by interview, documentation, and observation. Then, the data were analyzed with the following steps: data collection, data reduction, data display, verification, and affirmation conclusions. The result of this study revealed that the students were classified based on their intelligences with interview and appropriate test of multiple intelligences done by MIR team. Therefore, Arabic teacher implemented a suitable method in the Arabic learning process for each class based on their needs. Yet, the teacher faced an obstacle when teaching the students with logical-mathematical and interpersonal intelligences. Another data indicated that classroom was not only the class for learning, sometimes the teacher challenged the students to study outdoor, school environment. The school environment and facilities contributed to support learning process and give the students more space to be creative and aware with what they found in the school environment.
... Children also depend on people around them, especially parents and teachers in order to learn, feel protected and relate, an argument that has also been emphasized by constructivists who argue that the role of the community is to offer support that enables construction (Al Natsheh & Komulainen, 2008). When children experience sensitive and responsive interactions with adults, social adjustment, improved behavior and, most importantly, learning undoubtedly takes place (Sapungan & Sapungan, 2014). Every child is born with the potential that they should be allowed to explore their world (Murray, 2011); however, the teacher is often known to prompt the learning progress of learners and in many instances determines the direction (Murray, 2011). ...
Thesis
The importance of parental involvement as a necessary and essential factor in children's education is well evidenced. Parental involvement is very essential for children's learning. participation of parents in their children's learning at school and at home might not be clear in rural primary school. An explorative study was conducted in three primary schools of Digholia Upazila in Khulna district. It was conducted nine interviews, three with headteachers, and six with SMC parent's members of selected three schools. Considering more importance, it was conducted also six FGDs, three with assistant teachers and another three with PTA parent's members. Purposive sampling technique and semi-structured interview guides and guides for FGD was used and the sample was collected from teachers and parent's members who were to some extent representative of rural primary school in Bangladesh. In-depth interview and focus group discussion were exercised as research methods to conduct the study. All the data have been organized and categorized for the results of the study. It was conducted the research under the qualitative research approach. The research project provides an analysis of what teacher's and parents' view as parents' role in their children's education. Here discussed influence of parental participation where most participated parents agreed that parental involvement affects student academic success. It also discussed the barriers to parents' involvement as well as explores possible ways to ensure their involvement. Most of the participants emphasized the importance of building up a good relationship, regular communication between teachers and parents, training, arranging for poor and working parents so on. The findings illustrate that teachers and parents are well aware of the importance of parental involvement in their students' learning. Most of the stakeholders establish at-home support for children within the sphere of parents' role and consider support for children's learning at other settings such as school and community. Furthermore, the reasons for which teachers contact parents are largely with regards to issues such as child's absence and the problem with behaviors and performance. Calling them through the phone were the ways selected by teachers to contact parents. The results of the study identified that parental involvement is not adequate and there are gaps in certain areas. The research also identifies the need for schools to increase more forums where literate and enthusiastic parents can easily access as well as existing structures such as SMC and PTA making more active.
Parental involvement strongly impacts student achievement
  • K S Conway
Conway, K. S. (2008). Parental involvement strongly impacts student achievement, New Research Finds. Retrieved January 01, 2014, from http://www.teachthought.com/learning/the-effect-of-parental-involvement-onacademic-achievement/
Northwest Regional Educational Laboratory, School Improvement Research Series
  • K Cotton
  • K Wikelund
Cotton, K., & Wikelund, K., Northwest Regional Educational Laboratory, School Improvement Research Series. In Parent Involvement in Education.
The benefits of parent involvement: What research has to say
  • G Olsen
Olsen, G. (2010). The benefits of parent involvement: What research has to say, July 20, 2010. Retrieved January 01, 2014, from http://teaching.about.com/od/J-Rteachingvocabulary/g/Parental-Involvement.htm
Parents and teachers working together, parent -teacher partnerships
  • A Morin
Morin, A. (2013). Parents and teachers working together, parent -teacher partnerships. Retrieved January 01, 2014, from http://childparenting.about.com/od/schoollearning/a/parents-and-teachers-workingtogether.htm
The Effect of Parental Involvement on Academic Achievement
  • A Pinantoan
Pinantoan, A. (2013). The Effect of Parental Involvement on Academic Achievement, 22 September 2013. Retrieved January 01, 2014, from http://www.teachthought.com/learning/the-effect-of-parental-involvement-onacademic-achievement/
Article
The authors sought to understand the types of parent involvement that teachers, parents, and students believe affect the academic achievement of adolescent learners at the junior high school level. Research that included focus groups, interviews, and surveys indicated that teachers and students believed that parent involvement at school was considered less important to a child's academic achievement than parent involvement in academics at home. In addition, parents rated themselves as more participatory in academics than did their children or junior high school teachers.