ArticlePDF Available

Concept of Beauty and Ayurveda Medicine

Authors:
  • Central Council for Research in Ayurveda sciences

Abstract

Beauty is the desire of every individual to give pleasure to the sense. Beauty is not always related to women rather men are more beauty consciousness as the evolution shows male animals are more beautiful. Some are beauty by birth and some are want to become beautiful [1]. The concept of using herbs for beautification is well defined in Ayurveda. The cosmetic preparations are used for worship and for sensual enjoyment in India since vedic period. The external application of kajala, tilaka, aguru, chandana, haridra etc to God and Goddess are seen in many rituals of India [2]. Cosmetology is the science of alternation of appearance and modification of beauty. Any substance or preparation intended to be placed in contact with the various external parts of human body (epidermis, hair, nails, lips, and external genitals) or with the teeth and mucous membrane of oral cavity with a view exclusively or mainly to cleaning them, changing their appearance and/or correcting body odors and /or protecting them or keeping them in good conditions
ISSN: 2155-9554
The International Open Access
Journal of Clinical & Experimental
Dermatology Research
Editor-in-Chief
Soldano Ferrone
University of Pittsburgh, USA
Executive Editor
Samira Yarak
Federal University of Sao Francisco Valley, Brazil
This article was originally published in a journal by OMICS
Publishing Group, and the attached copy is provided by OMICS
Publishing Group for the author’s benet and for the benet of
the author’s institution, for commercial/research/educational use
including without limitation use in instruction at your institution,
sending it to specic colleagues that you know, and providing a copy
to your institutions administrator.
All other uses, reproduction and distribution, including without
limitation commercial reprints, selling or licensing copies or access,
or posting on open internet sites, your personal or institution’s
website or repository, are requested to cite properly.
Available online at: OMICS Publishing Group (www.omicsonline.org)
Digital Object Identier: http://dx.doi.org/10.4172/2155-9554.1000178
Review Article Open Access
Clinical & Experimental
Dermatology Research
Hazra and Panda, J Clin Exp Dermatol Res 2013, 4:3
http://dx.doi.org/10.4172/2155-9554.1000178
Volume 4 • Issue 3 • 1000178
J Clin Exp Dermatol Res
ISSN:2155-9554 JCEDR, an open access journal
*Corresponding author: Ashok Kumar Panda, Research Ofcer (S2), National
Research Institute of Ayurvedic Drug Development, CN-4, Sector –V, Bidhan
Nagar, Kolkota, India, Email: drashokpanda69@gmail.com
Received March 16, 2013; Accepted July 18, 2013; Published July 24, 2013
Citation: Hazra J, Panda AK (2013) Concept of Beauty and Ayurveda Medicine. J
Clin Exp Dermatol Res 4: 178. doi:10.4172/2155-9554.1000178
Copyright: © 2013 Hazra J, et al. This is an open-access article distributed under
the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted
use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original author and
source are credited.
Concept of Beauty and Ayurveda Medicine
Jayram Hazra1 and Ashok Kumar Panda2*
1Director, Dept of AYUSH, Ministry of Health & FW, Central Council for Research in Ayurveda Science, National Research Institute of Ayurvedic Drug Development, India
2Research Ofcer (S2), Central Council for Research in Ayurveda Science, National Research Institute of Ayurvedic Drug Development, India
Keywords: Ayurvedic cosmetics; Beauty; Herbo-cosmo-caeutical;
Panchakarma
Introduction
Beauty is the desire of every individual to give pleasure to the sense.
Beauty is not always related to women rather men are more beauty
consciousness as the evolution shows male animals are more beautiful.
Some are beauty by birth and some are want to become beautiful
[1]. e concept of using herbs for beautication is well dened in
Ayurveda. e cosmetic preparations are used for worship and for
sensual enjoyment in India since vedic period. e external application
of kajala, tilaka, aguru, chandana, haridra etc to God and Goddess
are seen in many rituals of India [2]. Cosmetology is the science of
alternation of appearance and modication of beauty. Any substance
or preparation intended to be placed in contact with the various
external parts of human body (epidermis, hair, nails, lips, and external
genitals) or with the teeth and mucous membrane of oral cavity with a
view exclusively or mainly to cleaning them, changing their appearance
and/or correcting body odors and /or protecting them or keeping them
in good conditions [3].
According to the Drugs and Cosmetics Act (India) 1940 cosmetics
may be dened as, any substance intended to be rubbed, poured,
sprinkled, or otherwise applied to human being for cleansing,
beautifying, promoting attractiveness. According to Ayurveda
happiness, gloom, sadness and relaxation are the aspects that are
reected by the face and by the body and can’t be disguised with
cosmetics. In other words, Ayurveda emphasizes on external and
internal beauty. It is believed in Ayurveda that one can enhance
internal beauty by understanding and following the basic principle
of Ayurveda. ere’s a secret beauty or the third level of beauty in
Ayurveda and is also known as the state of ‘self-realization’. It is said
that a self realized person is eternally beautiful and does not need to use
any external cosmetics or designer clothes. However, in Ayurveda the
therapies, treatment and tips are concern with physical beauty which is
considered to be the path to secret of beauty. Health promotion, beauty
management and healing in Ayurveda rely on freeing the body of ama
(toxins), restoring cellular nutrition, facilitating complete elimination
and re-establishing the balance of the doshas. Diet and lifestyle are two
things that help achieve good health and beauty. As Ayurveda relates
to every aspect of the mind, body and the soul, it considers beauty as
an intimate part of the human personality. To serve the purpose of
fast natural beauty a faster and deeper cleansing and re-balancing is
accomplished by using Ayurveda’s traditional rejuvenation therapy.
e rejuvenation therapy in Ayurveda teaches ways to become
naturally beautiful, which is not just limited to the physical body but
extends to subtle qualities and vitality of a person. Hence, rejuvenation
therapy is regarded as an integral part of ongoing self-care that helps
beauty be with you throughout life and a fresh start in the process of
making health-supporting lifestyle changes.
Consumer trends suggest a gradual shi from chemical-based
products to ayurvedic beauty products. Growing concern over side
eects of chemical-based products is the main reason behind this
trend. e Ayurvedic natural cosmetics business of India is growing at
the rate of 15-20% per year- much higher than India’s overall cosmetics
business that has a growth rate of 7-8% [4].
Abstract
Beauty consciousness and the knowledge of application of herbs, minerals and animals products are as old
phenomena as the human existence. Beauty of person gives perceptual experience of pleasure or satisfaction. Ayurveda
never isolate the involvement of metal and spiritual well being from the concept of beauty. Ayurveda determined beauty
by prakriti (Body constitution), sara (structural predominance), sanhanan (compactness of body), twak (skin completion),
Praman (Measurement) and dirghayu lakshyana (symptom of long life). Beauty is not only a source of jay but gives
condence and proud in some extent. Ayurveda cosmetology started from mother wombs, dinacharya, ratricharya, ritu
charya with the practice of medicinal herbs and minerals. Ayurveda physician believe that toxic materials inside our body
make a person ugly and disease and Sodhana (Purication) is the best therapeutic intervention to eliminate body toxins.
Charak samhita classied cosmetics drugs as Varnya, Kustagna, Kandugna, bayasthapak, udardaprasamana, etc and
many alepam (poultice) are described in Susruta Samhita and astanga hrudaya. Some medicinal plants like- Haridra,
Manjistha, Sariba, Chandana, Amalaki, Gritkumari , Babul, Lavanga,Sikakai, Aritha, Brinaraj etc has been prescribed
for beautication of skin, hair, teeth, nails etc. Diet has a special role to improve and maintain beauty of an individual.
Panchakarma procedures are employed for beatication of skin –the marker of overall condition of individual as per
Ayurveda. Snehana and Swedan are believed to be inhibiting trans-epidermal water loss, restoring the lipid barrier and
restore the amino-lipid of the skin. There are signicant evidences already generated for Ayurveda skin care in vitiligo,
psoriasis, and eczema and acne vulgaris. Consumer trends suggest a gradual shift from chemical-based products to
Ayurvedic beauty products. India could emerge as a major contributor to the global cosmetic industry. This will possible,
as one of the strengths of India is Ayurvedic tradition.
Citation: Hazra J, Panda AK (2013) Concept of Beauty and Ayurveda Medicine. J Clin Exp Dermatol Res 4: 178. doi:10.4172/2155-9554.1000178
Page 2 of 4
Volume 4 • Issue 3 • 1000178
J Clin Exp Dermatol Res
ISSN:2155-9554 JCEDR, an open access journal
Concept of Beauty in Ayurveda
Ayurveda determined beauty by prakriti (Body constitution), sara
(structural predominance), sanhanan (compactness of body), twak
(skin completion), Praman (Measurement) and dirghayu lakshyana
( symptom of long life). Beauty is not only a source of jay but gives
condence and proud in some extent. Ayurveda cosmetology started
from mother wombs, dinacharya, ratricharya, ritu charya with the
practice of medicinal herbs and minerals. Charaka narrated that beauty
of female is enhanced by nding a suitable man, similarly a man can
enhanced his appearance by getting with similar mind, psyche and
liking with excellent quality partner. Beautiful woman is always
praised in our ancient text as virtue, wealth; auence and creation
depend on women. ere was a provision for appointing a beautiful
woman (kalinee) in the Rasasala (pharmacy) for rasabandha and the
characteristic of Kalinee is well described in Rasaratna samuchachaya
and Anandakanda. If the kalinee is not available then the specic
way to convert ordinary woman to kalinee is also possible by the
administration of one karsa (3 gm) of puried sulphur along with ghee
for twenty one days [5].
According to Ayurveda Human body functions through various
channel systems called “Srotamsi”, containing both microscopic and
macroscopic structures such as the respiratory system, lymphatic/
circulatory system, reproductive system and nervous systems, among
others. ese channels function as innumerable psycho-biological
processes such as enzyme production, neuro-transmitter secretion,
hormonal intelligence, respiratory capacity and digestive assimilation/
elimination, immune power etc and responsible for wellness and
beauty. ese act rhythmically and in concert with one another to
perform complex decision-making regarding the supply of nutrients,
ltration of toxins, excretion of wastes and much more. If these
waste materials are insuciently metabolized, toxins or incompletely
processed foods and experiences can become deposited in weak areas
of the body. If unaddressed, these can become a disease. Weak zones
occur in the body due genetic factors or more commonly, lifestyle
factors, such as unhealthy food choices, stress or environmental
inuences. ese toxins or unprocessed metabolic deposits can cloud
the normal psycho-biological cellular intelligence and loss body lustre
and beauty. Panchakarma therapy is both preventative for healthy
people to maintain and improve excellent cellular function, and
curative for those experiencing disease.
e Ama (toxic materials inside our body) make a person ugly
and disease and Sodhana/panchakarma (Purication) is the best
therapeutic intervention to eliminate body toxins. It is a highly complex
and sophisticated science of purication of the body/mind.
Water is a major component for keeping skin in good condition.
Water originates in the deeper epidermal layers and moves upward to
hydrate cells in the stratum corneum in the skin, eventually being lost
to evaporation. Snehana and Swedana bring moisture to our skin. It
gives our skin greater elasticity and rejuvenates skin tissues. As cells
in our face make their way to the surface over their lifecycle, they die
and become saturated with keratin, or skin debris. Keratin is important
because it protects your skin from the elements but the shedding of
that outer layer can unclog pores. Snehana and Swedan are believed
to be inhibit trans-epidermal water loss, restoring the lipid barrier
and restore the amino-lipid of the skin. Ayurveda always advocated
vegetarian diet in appropriate quantity and advice for plenty of water
intakes for restore the beauty and youthfulness.
Ayurveda medicine as Cosmetics
Charak samhita classied cosmetics drugs as Varnya, Kustagna,
Kandugna, bayasthapak, udardaprasamana, etc. Many alepam
(poultice) Pradeha, upnaha anjana oil are described in Susruta Samhita
and astanga hrudaya in the context of twak roga. e very common
medicine are- Kungkumadi lepam, Dasnga lepam,Chandanadi
lepam, Dasana samskar churna , Kukummadi taila, Nilibringaraj taila,
Himasagar taila, etc are very well established medicine in Ayurveda.
Sesame Oil is used as a base in many oil in Ayurveda. It contains Lignan
compounds called Sesamin and Sesamolin, which are biologically
active. ese compounds enhance oxidative stability of the oil. ey
have potential to be used as anti oxidant compounds as well as having
a moisturising eect. Buttermilk and goat’s milk powders traditionally
used in Indian face mask preparations have soothing and emollient
properties. ey also contain vitamin A, B6, B12 and E. ey would
make benecial alternatives to chemical bases and emollients. Shikakai
is a traditional herb used in hair shampoos. e material is extracted
from the Shikakai pods and Shikakai nuts of the Acacia Concinna shrub.
e pods are rich in Saponins and make a mild detergenent, which
has a neutral pH. Aritha powder, extracted from Soapnuts (Sapindus
Pericarp) also contains Saponins, which acts as a foaming agent. It was
used as soap in Ayurvedic tradition. e oils also maintain integrity of
cosmetic products and could be used as a base instead of petroleum and
plastic derivatives. ere are signicant evidences already generated for
Ayurveda skin care in vitiligo, psoriasis, eczema and acne vulgaris [6].
e Ayurvedic cosmetics may group under [6,7]
1. Cosmetics for enhancing the appearance of facial skin
2. Cosmetics for hair growth and care
3. Cosmetics for skin care, especially in teenager (acne, pimples
and sustaining)
4. Shampoos, soaps, powders and perfumery, etc.
5. Miscellaneous products
List of medicinal plants listed in Ayurveda for proven cosmo-
ceutical (Table 1).
Discussion and Conclusion
e market for ayurvedic beauty products is growing fast. Many
companies have entered the segment with branded products in
categories such as skin care, hair care, soaps and essential oils.Concern
about harmful chemicals in beauty products has increased consumer
interest in natural cosmetics. More and more products now include
herbal and botanical ingredients. e botanical actives market in
Europe and North America is worth US$ 840 million. Consumption
for these products is growing at 8% [8]. Today, India is captivating
the mainstream cosmetics industry in a big way. It starts from high-
end brands creating makeup shades based on the country’s bright
colors to skin- and hair-care lines capitalizing on Ayurveda, an ancient
medicinal system using herbs and other natural ingredients [8].
Indian herbs and Ayurveda products are being sourced and
tested for use in the cosmetics industry and practiced beauty parlours
[9]. However, there is a long way to go before herbs can make it as
ingredients in viable botanical products. ese herbs are currently
used in their crude form, either dried into powders or pulverised
with pestle and mortar. e end product contains a large amount
of inactive unnecessary compounds [10]. e products are oen
biologically ineective because there aren’t enough active components
in the formulae. e concentration and action of bioactive compounds
extracted from herbs have to be increased [11,12]. ese formulae have
to be tested in scientic trials with an evidence based approach. India
Citation: Hazra J, Panda AK (2013) Concept of Beauty and Ayurveda Medicine. J Clin Exp Dermatol Res 4: 178. doi:10.4172/2155-9554.1000178
Page 3 of 4
Volume 4 • Issue 3 • 1000178
J Clin Exp Dermatol Res
ISSN:2155-9554 JCEDR, an open access journal
A. Medicinal Plants used as Moisturizers, Skin Tonics & Anti-Aging
1.Aloe vera - Moisturizer, Sunscreen & Emollient
2.Calendula ofcinalis - Wound healing
3.Cichorium intybus - Skin blemishes
4.Curcuma longa - Antiseptic,Antibacterial, Improves complexion
5.Daucus carota -Natural toner and skin rejuvenator
6.Glycyrrhiza glabra - Skin whitening
7.Ocimum sanctum - Anti-aging, Antibacterial & Antiseptic
8.Rosa damascena - Toning & Cooling
9.Rosmarinus ofcinalis - Skin rejuvenator & Cleansing
10.Rubia cordifolia - Wound healing & Anti-aging
11.Triticum sativum - Antioxidant, Skin nourisher, anti-wrinkle
B. Sun Screen
Aloe vera Moisturizer, Suticum sativum Antioxidant
C. Sun Tan
Cyperus rotundus - Sun tanning
Moringa oliefera - Sun tanning
D. Astringent
Mesua ferrea - Strong Astringent
Pistacia Integerrim - Astringent, Rubefacient, Anti-bacterial
Terminalia chebul - Astringent, Anti-bacterial, Antifungal & Antiseptic
E. Ayurvedic Ingredients for Dental Care Product Uses
Azadirachta indica Toothache, Anti-bacterial, Dental carries
Acacia Arabica Swelling, Bleeding gums & Syphilitic infections
Barleria prionitis Toothache, Bleeding gums & strengthens teeth
Mimosops Elengi Astringent, keep gums healthy
Pimpinella anisum Antiseptic, Aromatic avor
Salvadora persica Potent Antimicrobial
Syzygium aromaticum Local anesthetic, relieves toothache
Symplocos Racemosus Strengthen gums and teeth
F. Dermatological Applications
Allium sativum Antifungal, Antiseptic, Tonic
Alpinia galanga Antibacterial
Azadirachta indica Potent Antibacterial
Celastrus paniculata Wounds healing, Eczema
Nigella sativa Antibacterial, Leucoderma
Pongamia glabra Herpes, Scabies, Leucoderma
Psoralea corylifolia Leucoderma, Leprosy,Psoriasis & Inammation
G. Ingredients for Hair Care Product Uses
Acacia concinna Natural Detergent & Anti-dandruff
Aloe Vera Cleanser & Revitalizer
Azadirachta indica Reduces hair loss, Anti-dandruff
Bacopa monnieri Hair tonic, Promotes hair growth
Cedrus deodara Anti-dandruff
Centella asiatica Darkening of hair
Eclipta alba Reduces premature graying of hair, Alopecia
Emblica ofcinalis Toner, Anti-dandruff, Protects & reduces hair loss
Hibiscus rosa sinensis Natural Hair dye, Prevent hair fall, Anti-dandruff
Hedychium spicatum Promotes hair growth
Lawsonia alba Natural Hair dye, Anti-dandruff, Conditioner
Rosmarinus ofcinalis Nourishes, Softens & restores the hair shafts
Sapindus trifoliatus Natural detergent & Cleanser
Triticum sativum Provides nourishment, lubrication & luster
Terminalia belerica Prevents graying of hair
Sesamum indicum Promotes hair growth, Blackens the hair
Table 1: List of medicinal plants listed in Ayurveda for proven cosmoceutical.
Citation: Hazra J, Panda AK (2013) Concept of Beauty and Ayurveda Medicine. J Clin Exp Dermatol Res 4: 178. doi:10.4172/2155-9554.1000178
Page 4 of 4
Volume 4 • Issue 3 • 1000178
J Clin Exp Dermatol Res
ISSN:2155-9554 JCEDR, an open access journal
could emerge as a major contributor to the global cosmetic industry.
is is one of the strengths of India with its Ayurvedic tradition.
References
1. Baumann L (2007) Botanicals ingredients in Cosmo-ceuticals. J. Drugs
Dermatol, 6:1084-1088.
2. Folwler JF, Woolervy-lioyd H, Waldalt Sainiid (2010) Inovations in natural
ingredients and their use in skin care. J drugs Dermatol 9: 72-81.
3. Chuarienthong P, Laurith N, leelaponnpisid P (2010) Clinical efcacy of
antiwrinkle cosmetics containing herbal avonoids. International journal of
cosmetic science, 32: 99-116
4. Datta HS, Paramesh R (2010) Trends in aging and skin care concepts. J
Ayurveda Integr 1:110-113.
5. Panda AK (2005) Cosmetology in Ayurveda Literature, Ayursurabhi 2-14.
6. Kapoor VP, Herbal cosmetics for skin and hair care, Natural product radiance ,
vol-4 July-Aug 2007, 307-14.
7. Momin NM, Disouza JI, Tatke PA, Melita Gonsalves, Aparna (2011) Marker
Based Standardization of Novel Herbal Dental Gel, Research Journal of
Topical and Cosmetic Science 2.
8. Arun Duraisamy, Nithya Narayanaswamy, Athena Sebastian, K P Balakrishnan
(2011) Sun protecction and anti-inammatory activities of some medicinal
plants, International Journal of Research in Cosmetic Science 1: 13-16
9. Paithankar VV (2010) Formulation and evaluation of herbal cosmetic
preparation using safed musli, Int.J. PharmTech Res 2.
10. Vijay N. Bidwaikar, Dr. Sanjay Kavishwa (2012) Beauty parlours – prospective
channel partners for retail promotion of herbal cosmetic products by S.M.E.
Indian Streams Research Journal.
11. Anil Samleti, Shrinivas Bumrela, Snehal Dhobale, Vaibhav Kekre (2012) Herbal
cosmetics, Indian stream research journal 2: 123-34.
Citation: Hazra J, Panda AK (2013) Concept of Beauty and Ayurveda Medicine.
J Clin Exp Dermatol Res 4: 178. doi:10.4172/2155-9554.1000178
Submit your next manuscript and get advantages of OMICS
Group submissions
Unique features:
• Userfriendly/feasiblewebsite-translationofyourpaperto50world’sleadinglanguages
• AudioVersionofpublishedpaper
• Digitalarticlestoshareandexplore
Special features:
• 250OpenAccessJournals
• 20,000editorialteam
• 21daysrapidreviewprocess
• Qualityandquickeditorial,reviewandpublicationprocessing
• IndexingatPubMed(partial),Scopus,EBSCO,IndexCopernicusandGoogleScholaretc
• SharingOption:SocialNetworkingEnabled
• Authors,ReviewersandEditorsrewardedwithonlineScienticCredits
• Betterdiscountforyoursubsequentarticles
Submityourmanuscriptat:www.editorialmanager.com/clinicalgroup
... Ayurvedic cosmetics started since decades ago and deals on the following aspects, namely, prakriti (body constitution), praman (measurement), sara (structural predominance), sanhanan (compactness of body), twak (skin complexion), and dirghayu lakshyana (symptom of long life). In Ayurveda, it is believed that if these aspects work together properly, then a level of inner and outer beauty is accomplished [59,60]. Charak Samhita is an ancient Indian father adopting Ayurvedic medicine who included common herbs in the Ayurvedic medicine. ...
... Acacia concinna and Sapindus pericarp are rich in saponins. Saponins, considered as a detergent, keep the pH neutral and also foaming agent [59]. Major advantages of using natural ingredients in cosmetic preparations as they have been tested on humans since decades ago; the human body responds much better to natural products rather than conventional chemical ones. ...
... Particular targeting to skin and hair and natural volatile constituents can cause relaxation and pleasant sensation upon inhalation as in aromatherapy [61]. There are many reviews listing common herbs used in preparation of natural cosmetics [59,61,62]. Cosmetology explained various terminological words as varnya that improves the complexion, Kesya that is suitable to hair, and tvacha that is good for skin. ...
Chapter
The concept of beauty and cosmetics is as ancient as mankind and civilization where everyone is obsessed with looking charming and young. A cosmetic is defined by the US Food and Drug Administration as the preparation used for cleaning, perfuming, and improving the appearance of the human body. Plants have emerged as the best source of cosmetic ingredients that meet the characteristics of efficiency and safety, thus increasingly replacing synthetic ingredients. Accordingly, there is a growing demand for naturally based cosmetics worldwide and an ever-growing interest in understanding their molecular and mechanistic aspects. In this chapter, we discussed the role of plants in cosmetology and skin care and how the various chemical structures exert biological activities on the skin of human.
... Various Formulae (natural product or herbal products and plants parts) were used in beauty parlors and cosmetics industry. These formulae have to be tested in scientific trials with an evidence based approach (Hazra and Panda, 2013). Present ...
... The products are often biologically ineffective because there aren"t enough active components in the formulae. The concentration and action of bioactive compounds extracted from herbs have to be increased (Hazra and Panda, 2013). These formulae have to be tested in scientific trials with an evidence based approach. ...
... The mixture of Azadirachta indica and Curcuma longa was used for curing skin ailments and for cosmetics in Assam (Saikia et al. 2006). The herb, Azadirachta indica have the properties of a Blood purifier, beauty enhancer and skin cleanser (Shweta et al., 2011, Yusuf et al., 2009).In the present study paste of leaves of Lawsonia inermis is applied externally for hair color, hair fall treatment, dandruff and as a natural hair dye(Hazra & Panda 2013). This plant also used by the local people in Bangladesh for hair tonic(Uddin et al. 2017). ...
Article
Full-text available
The present article mainly focuses plant species used in beauty care and cosmetics. The ethno botanical study has been resulted in recording of total 43 plants under 32 families under 40 genera that were reported by interviewing 27 key informants. According to the habit diversity of recorded plant, 52% were herb, 38% were tree, and 10% were shrub. Leaves (28%), fruits (28%), Seed (25%) were the most commonly used part for plants or for the preparation of the mixture which is used in the beauty care and herbal cosmetics. The most frequently used plants for beauty care were Aloe vera, Azadirachta indica, Cucumis sativus, Curcuma longa, Lawsonia inermis, Mentha arvensis, Citrus limon, Santalum album, Phyllanthus emblica, Rosa damascena, Trigonella foenum-graecum. Active ingredients may found from these plants which could be the good source of plant based cosmetics for beauty care.
... The text has classified numerous herbs as cosmetic drugs that are used to enhance and protect beauty. In Ayurveda, 'Ayu' means life and 'Veda' means science (Hazra & Panda, 2013). It is the form of the traditional knowledge system that has a strong philosophical basis in India. ...
... In India, traditional knowledge has a rich history with widespread application in diverse fields of agriculture, environment protection, medicine and beauty (Banerjee, 2009). As discussed in the Charak Samhita, an ancient text, since centuries, Indian communities have been using herbs, plants and plant products for beautification and health maintenance (Dwivedi & Holkar, 2007;Hazra & Panda, 2013). Although the ingredients of Ayurvedic products are resourced from nature (plants, animals and minerals), the final form of products are a mix of nature (natural ingredients) and culture (procedures and rituals regarding the appropriate use, application and form of these products) (Abraham, 2009). ...
Article
This article addresses links between entrepreneurs’ cultural and symbolic capital and their practices of knowledge generation for innovation. Through an ethnographic study of four Ayurvedic cosmetics manufacturing MSMEs in Mumbai, we argue that innovation in cosmetics MSMEs is the result of conversion of cultural capital into symbolic capital that in turn converts into economic capital. The study shows that Ayurveda knowledge resides in the entrepreneur’s family tradition and mostly transfers in a tacit form. The entrepreneurs’ acquisition of symbolic capital intertwines with the discourse of ‘sustainable development’, which makes ‘natural’ fashionable and ‘traditional’ knowledge prestigious. Within this discourse, Ayurveda knowledge acquires symbolic value which makes entrepreneurs’ cultural knowledge valuable and legitimate. The analyses of representative cases show how cultural capital and symbolic capital impact acquisition of knowledge in ways that facilitate entrepreneurs to attain legitimacy through innovations. We argue that appropriation of different forms of capital by entrepreneurs reinforces the beauty field’s normative structure which in turn facilitates knowledge generation for innovation in cosmetics MSMEs.
... Introduction Acacia concinna Linn. or Sompoi, belonging to the family Fabaceae, is widely grown in Southern and Southeast Asia for medicinal purposes [1,2]. Its pod has been recognized as a component in holy water used for paying respect to elderly people in many special festivals in Thailand, especially the Songkran festival [3]. ...
... Its pod has been recognized as a component in holy water used for paying respect to elderly people in many special festivals in Thailand, especially the Songkran festival [3]. The Indian Ayurvedic pharmacopeia stated that A. concinna pod has been used as an active ingredient in anti-dandruff shampoos [1]. The main chemical constituent of the pod is saponin (20.8%) which was responsible for antidermatophyte and antimicrobial properties [2]. ...
Article
Full-text available
The aim of this study was to enhance the solubility and stability of Acacia concinna extract by loading in a microemulsion for topical application. Both physical appearance and biological activitie of the extract-loaded microemulsion were determined in comparison with the extract solution. Pseudoternary phase diagrams of three oil types including tea seed oil, grape seed oil, and sesame oil, together with polysorbate 85 or the mixture of polysorbate 85 and sorbitan oleate as surfactants, and absolute ethanol as a co-surfactant were constructed to optimize the microemulsion area. The selected microemulsion was then characterized for droplets size, polydispersity index, and viscosity. Tea seed oil exhibited the highest microemulsion area in the phase diagram because it had the highest unsaturated fatty acid content. The microemulsion composed of tea seed oil (5%), polysorbate 85 (40%), ethanol (20%), and water (35%) exhibited Newtonian flow behavior with the droplet size and polydispersity index of 68.03 ± 1.09 nm and 0.44 ± 0.04, respectively. After 4% w/w of the extract was incorporated into the microemulsion, larger droplets size was observed (239.77 ± 12.69 nm) with a lower polydispersity index (0.37 ± 0.02). After storage in various conditions, both physical appearances and the stability of biological activity of the extract-loaded microemulsion were improved compared to the solution. Therefore, the A. concinna loaded microemulsion may be a promising carrier for further development into a topical formulation and clinical trials for pharmaceutical and cosmeceutical applications are also suggested.
... Within this modern era of technology and globalization, it is quite surprising to find a shift in consumer preference from chemical based synthetic products to more natural or "green" products. This could perhaps be explained by the increasing concerns of side effects that are associated with chemical products (Hazra and Panda, 2013). However, due to a recent increase in the global demand for active plant ingredients within the medical and cosmetic industries, medicinal plant species are now experiencing severe mass exploitation which may ultimately lead to their extinction. ...
Book
Full-text available
Lignans encompass a large and complex group of phytochemicals widely distributed throughout terrestrial plant lineages. Lignans play important roles in both plant ecology (interactions with and adaptation to an ever-changing environment) and physiology/ development. As their specialized metabolite nature might suppose, lignans have been related to plant defense against a number of herbivores and microorganisms. For example, their constitutive deposition helps impart durability, longevity, and resistance to the heartwoods of many tree species against wood-rotting fungi, therefore acting as phytoanticipins. Lignans can also act as phytoalexins, being synthesized de novo by plants accumulating quickly at areas of pathogen or herbivore attack. However, the precise roles in planta and the ecological significances of most lignans are still not well established. As for many biologically active compounds originating from plants, lignan exploration has not been restricted solely to the plant research field but has also triggered intensive studies in the fields of human diet and/or health research over the last decades. Some lignans, belonging to the phytoestrogen class are converted, upon ingestion, by human gastrointestinal microbiota into the mammalian lignans enterodiol and enterolactone. The latter display the well-described chemopreventive properties against various tumors (such as breast, colon and prostate cancers) or cardiovascular disorders, whereas some other studies also report their roles in preventing diabetes. Other lignans are already used in pharmacy and medicine such as podophyllotoxin, the natural starting compound for the synthesis of lead anticancer drugs (Etoposide, Teniposide, Etopophos). However, many questions remain concerning i) their bioconversion, pharmacokinetic, and molecular targets, etc. and ii) in simply searching for their perennial and viable sources for human health applications. From a biosynthetic point of view, many lignans are formed by the oxidative coupling of E-coniferyl alcohol moieties. But gene identification, gene regulation or biosynthetic enzyme characterization study are still scarce. For example, lignans can share the same precursor as for lignins, the complex polymers that provide rigidity and support to the vascular plants. The regulation of the genes specifically related to lignan biosynthesis or the precursor partition between lignin and lignans have only rarely been investigated. Such data though could yield not only information about the role of these compounds but also for optimizing their bioproduction using metabolic engineering strategies. Their chemical nature, structural features, physicochemical behavior, and concentrations greatly differ from various plant organs or cultures, food or biological matrices making their extraction, analysis, and purification very challenging. The development of efficient analytical methods dedicated to lignans helps to provide new insight in the natural lignan chemodiversity, evolution throughout the plant kingdom as well as metabolization/detoxification following their absorption/injection in the human body. Moreover, although most in vivo and in vitro data are globally in favor of a chemopreventive effect of lignans, epidemiological studies are sometimes much less conclusive and the mechanism still remains unclear and requires further elucidation. Therefore, the availability of purified lignans at a reasonable cost would allow easier in vivo supplementation experiments and elucidation of mechanisms. All the known in planta biosynthesis roles as well as health benefits of lignans provide new frontiers for scientists from diverse fields of expertise to further study, elucidate or establish biosynthetic pathways, metabolic engineering, analytical methods and health action mechanisms of this important class of phytochemicals. This Research Topic is devoted to the latest new insights, in the form of Reviews and Original Research articles, as well as Communication and Perspective papers covering several aspects of plant lignans including: 1) Biosynthesis: gene expression regulation, gene identification, enzyme characterization, chemical ecology, and pathway evolution, etc. Note that descriptive studies involving omics approaches with no functional insights into plant biology are not considered for review. 2) Phytochemistry/analytical methods: occurrence and diversity in plant lineage, extraction, separation and purification analytical methods, structural elucidation, etc. Note that only studies focusing on the plant standpoint will be considered. 3) Metabolic engineering: plants, in vitro cultures, elicitation, biotransformation, biocatalysts, etc. 4) Biological activity of lignans related to human health: in vitro and in vivo laboratory experiments, epidemiological studies, potential mechanisms and effects on human diseases, toxicology, potential side effects, etc. Note that studies carried out with crude extracts will not be considered for review. Only the use of highly purified, chemically characterized compounds is acceptable. Keywords: Lignans, Metabolic engineering, Analytical methods, Biological activity, Lignans metabolism
... Within this modern era of technology and globalization, it is quite surprising to find a shift in consumer preference from chemical based synthetic products to more natural or "green" products. This could perhaps be explained by the increasing concerns of side effects that are associated with chemical products (Hazra and Panda, 2013). However, due to a recent increase in the global demand for active plant ingredients within the medical and cosmetic industries, medicinal plant species are now experiencing severe mass exploitation which may ultimately lead to their extinction. ...
Article
Full-text available
Over the last few decades, methods relating to plant tissue culture have become prevalent within the cosmetic industry. Forecasts predict the cosmetic industry to grow to an annual turnover of around a few hundred billion US dollars. Here we focused on Linum usitatissimum L., a plant that is well-known for its potent cosmetic properties. Following the a) establishment of cell cultures from three distinct initial explant origins (root, hypocotyl, and cotyledon) and b) selection of optimal hormonal concentrations, two in vitro systems (callus vs cell suspensions) were subjected to different light conditions. Phytochemical analysis by UPLC-HRMS not only confirmed high (neo)lignan accumulation capacity of this species with high concentrations of seven newly described (neo)lignans. Evaluation over 30 days revealed strong variations between the two different in vitro systems cultivated under light or dark, in terms of their growth kinetics and phytochemical composition. Additionally, antioxidant (i.e. four different in vitro assays based on hydrogen-atom transfer or electron transfermechanism) and anti-aging (i.e. four in vitro inhibition potential of the skin remodeling enzymes: elastase, hyaluronidase, collagenase and tyrosinase) properties were evaluated for the two different in vitro systems cultivated under light or dark. A prominent hydrogenatomtransfer antioxidantmechanism was illustrated by the DPPH and ABTS assays. Potent tyrosinase and elastase inhibitory activities were also observed, which was strongly influenced by the in vitro system and light conditions. Statistical treatments of the data showed relationship of some (neo)lignans with these biological activities. These results confirmed the accumulation of flax (neo)lignans in different in vitro systems that were subjected to distinct light conditions. Furthermore, we showed the importance of optimizing these parameters for specific applications within the cosmetic industry.
Chapter
The cosmetic and personal care product industry, unlike any other industry, has been ‘recession proof' in the Asian market. Not only do Asian consumers have a great appetite for innovative products, but they are also demanding in terms of product performance. Traditionally, the Asian consumer has been a fan of Western cosmetics and personal care products. With the changing times, however, there has been a shift in preference from Western cosmetics to ‘“natural” ones. The Asian consumer has started believing in the efficacy of natural ingredients. This chapter determines the extent of environmental concern among female Indian consumers when purchasing personal care products. It also examines the role of consumer willingness to pay for environmentally-friendly products when making green purchases. It also tests if willingness to pay can be predicted based on certain product attributes.
Article
Full-text available
The present modern era, consumers are aware of the importance of good nutrition and its relation to health and beauty. Dietary supplements which provide added health benefit along with nutrition to the body are well known since ages. Nutricosmetics are the nutrient components which have a dual action as nutrients and cosmetics. It has been shown that they function at the basal level to ameliorate the various pathological conditions providing good health. Their effect is indirect through the improvement of holistic health. They promote the concept of beauty through a healthy body. These products have active ingredients, which offer a vital link between the health and cosmetic properties of nutritional ingredients.
Chapter
Ayurveda, which literally translates to “knowledge of life,” defines disease as the end result of “living out of harmony” with one's constitution. An imbalance in the dhatus could cause skin disease. An imbalance in these dhatus could cause skin disease. Ayurveda classifies three types of psychological states: the Tamo guna (inertia), Rajoguna (activity), and Satvaguna (balanced peaceful state) that can affect the doshas and agni and cause disease (psychosomatic phenomenon). Ayurveda describes the concept of beauty by prakriti (body constitution), sara(structural predominance), sanhanan (compactness of body), twak (skin complexion), praman (measurement), and dirghayu lakshyana (symptom of long life). Shikakai maintains the PH balance of the skin and hair. Dashamula, and gugguli (C. mukul) mixture in an oily‐based ointment are prescribed for dry, rough skin. Sandalwood, turmeric, and camphor extracts reduce inflammatory conditions. Nutmeg and mustard oil increase circulation.
Article
Full-text available
The association between Ayurveda, anti-aging and cosmeceuticals is gaining importance in the beauty, health and wellness sector. Ayurvedic cosmeceuticals date back to the Indus Valley Civilization. Modern research trends mainly revolve around principles of anti-aging activity described in Ayurveda: Vayasthapana (age defying), Varnya (brighten skin-glow), Sandhaniya (cell regeneration), Vranaropana (healing), Tvachya (nurturing), Shothahara (anti-inflammatory), Tvachagnivardhani (strengthening skin metabolism) and Tvagrasayana (retarding aging). Many rasayana plants such as Emblica officinalis (Amla) and Centella asiatica (Gotukola) are extensively used.
Article
In the present study we have to formulate the cream by using the various concentration of safed musli extract, along with the other ingredients like stearic acid, cetyl alcohol, mineral oil, triethanol amine, glycerin, safed musli, perfume, preservative, and distilled water, to choose out the best concentration ratio for the creams which will give the better anti ageing result we have selected the ratio of 7: 2: 20: 2:10: 3.5: 1 0.5 .this single formulation (cream) is used as anti ageing .
Article
Herbal anti-wrinkle cosmetics were formulated from ginkgo (Ginkgo biloba), a mixture of tea and rooibos (Camellia sinensis and Aspalathus linearis) and soybean (Glycine soja). These extracts were incorporated into the preliminary developed stable gel base with good preference. The gingko formulation was found to be more stable than the formula containing a mixture of tea and rooibos and the soybean formula. Clinical efficacies of the ginkgo formula and the formula containing a mixture of tea and rooibos were compared following 28 days of application. The ginkgo preparation increased skin moisturization (27.88%) and smoothness (4.32%) and reduced roughness (0.4%) and wrinkles (4.63%), whereas the formula containing tea and rooibos showed the best efficacy on wrinkle reduction (9.9%). In comparison to the tea and rooibos formula, gingko significantly improved skin moisturization (P = 0.05).
Botanicals ingredients in Cosmo-ceuticals
  • L Baumann
Baumann L (2007) Botanicals ingredients in Cosmo-ceuticals. J. Drugs Dermatol, 6:1084-1088.
Inovations in natural ingredients and their use in skin care
  • J F Folwler
  • H Woolervy-Lioyd
  • Waldalt Sainiid
Folwler JF, Woolervy-lioyd H, Waldalt Sainiid (2010) Inovations in natural ingredients and their use in skin care. J drugs Dermatol 9: 72-81.
Cosmetology in Ayurveda Literature
  • A K Panda
Panda AK (2005) Cosmetology in Ayurveda Literature, Ayursurabhi 2-14.
Herbal cosmetics for skin and hair care, Natural product radiance
  • Vp Kapoor
Kapoor VP, Herbal cosmetics for skin and hair care, Natural product radiance, vol-4 July-Aug 2007, 307-14.
Aparna (2011) Marker Based Standardization of Novel Herbal Dental Gel
  • N M Momin
  • J I Disouza
  • P A Tatke
  • Melita Gonsalves
Momin NM, Disouza JI, Tatke PA, Melita Gonsalves, Aparna (2011) Marker Based Standardization of Novel Herbal Dental Gel, Research Journal of Topical and Cosmetic Science 2.
Sun protecction and anti-inflammatory activities of some medicinal plants
  • Arun Duraisamy
  • Nithya Narayanaswamy
  • Athena Sebastian
  • K P Balakrishnan
Arun Duraisamy, Nithya Narayanaswamy, Athena Sebastian, K P Balakrishnan (2011) Sun protecction and anti-inflammatory activities of some medicinal plants, International Journal of Research in Cosmetic Science 1: 13-16