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The impacts of a concept greenhouse with highly insulating double glass and a new method for greenhouse dehumidification management on energy use

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Abstract

In order to reduce the dependency on fossil fuels, the Dutch horticultural sector puts a lot of effort in the reduction of energy demand. By using multiple thermal screens, a modest temperature regime and allowing high humidities, the energy consumption of a greenhouse can be reduced substantially, but for additional savings, a considerable increase of the insulation is needed.

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