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Abstract

Mussel aquaculture is the main source of this valuable seafood. China, Spain, Chile, and Thailand are the largest producers, whose total average harvest in 2010 was 1,272,131 t accounted for 65% of the total world production.Assuming that when a food compound contributes 20% or more of a nutrient's Recommended Daily Allowance, the food can be taken as a good source of that component; mussel meat is a good source of proteins, vitamin B12, Fe, P, and omega-3 fatty acids (DHA+EPA).Mussels are not consumed raw but rather are processed through pre-cooking, followed by freezing or sterilization. The processing effects on mussel composition are mainly caused by two mechanisms: material exchange between mussel meat and processing media (water, steam, brine, air), and thermal inactivation by high temperature (molecular lysis or reaction) when mussels are sterilized. The main effect of processing on mussel components is their concentration due to water loss. Leaching and reaction have a minor influence.

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... Mussels are food with low fat and high protein content, very low caloric values and high mineral content (Tavares et al., 1998). Moreover, mussels are rich in vitamins as B12, thiamin and riboflavin, minerals as iron, phosphorus, zinc and selenium and polyunsaturated fatty acid such as eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA) and docosahexaenoic acid (DHA) (The U.S. Department of Agriculture, 2015;Almonacid et al., 2015). Moreover, food trend studies (Sloan, 2014(Sloan, , 2015 have confirmed that protein-rich products and ready to eat meals are actual food consumption trends. ...
... Few data are available about the effects of thermal processing on the nutritional value of mussels. Almonacid et al. (2015) concluded that, after thermal processing, mussels present good nutritional value, because many nutrients are not significantly affected by such process (Technical University of Denmark, 2009). Biji et al. (2015) confirmed that thermal processed mussel meat was nutritionally balanced with respect to essential amino acids and fatty acids although some nutrient loss was detected. ...
... Preliminary tests were performed with mussels of the batch B 0 to calculate the processing time needed to reach the required F 0 (lethality for C. botulinum, z = 10 °C and T ref = 121.1 °C) of 7 min commonly used for retorted seafood Almonacid et al., 2015). The calculation was done with a classical mathematical method (Stumbo, 1973). ...
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Chopped mussel meat packaged in retort pouches was processed in a laboratory-scale water immersion retort, adapted for processing under overpressure conditions. Retort temperature effects on product yield and on cook value were evaluated by setting the F0 at 7 min. The effects of different pre-treatments (salting and marination) on the characteristics of mussels were evaluated after processing at retort temperature of 118 °C and during a whole year of storage at 25 °C. The salted samples showed better yield during storage, while no differences were found for the other physicochemical parameters. © 2015, Sociedade Brasileira de Ciencia e Tecnologia de Alimentos, SBCTA. All rights reserved.
... In China, mussels are mainly sold fresh, and the utilization of mussels for further processing is still relatively low. In addition to fresh sales, some mussel meat will be processed into convenient or frozen food for sale, some will be made into dried products to extend its shelf life to facilitate transportation, and some even be directly used as feed or abandoned, resulting in waste of resources [7]. Therefore, enhancing the value of the (≥99.9%, ...
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