Article

Workload Associated with Nuclear Power Plant Main Control Room Tasks

Authors:
  • SAM SIngapore Math Sta Mesa Manila
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Abstract

Nuclear Power Plant (NPP) operators complete a variety of tasks to ensure the NPP is running safely and efficiently. However, the levels and types of workload associated with the different task types are not yet fully understood. The present investigation examined workload levels and types for three common NPP Main Control Room (MCR) tasks in a controlled experimental environment using a variety of subjective, physiological, and performance measures of workload. The results suggest that the three task types differ in the levels and types of workload. These findings can be used to better understand the types of NPP tasks that induce workload and the type of workload they induce. The full results of these experiments will be captured in future articles and technical reports.

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... The participants had a greater workload in the identification task realm, not to mention that the mental demand was higher in those tasks. Meanwhile, according to NASA-TLX, the frustration scale and the total workload was at the highest point (Reinerman-Jones et al. 2015). ...
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