Article

iZ HERO Adventure: Evaluating the Effectiveness of a Peer-Mentoring and Transmedia Cyberwellness Program for Children.

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Abstract

There is a lack of rigorous evaluations of school-based Cyberwellness programs that seek to improve students’ attitudes and behaviors regarding the Internet. The purpose of this study was to implement and evaluate a new Cyberwellness program, the iZ HERO Adventure, which is a hands-on digital exhibition involving peer-mentoring and a transmedia adventure storytelling mode within a multisystemic approach. A total of 440 Grades 4, 5, and 6 students were recruited from 4 elementary schools in Singapore. Three hundred six participants were from Grade 4 (mentees) while 134 were from Grades 5 and 6 (mentors). A quasi-experimental design was used. Participants in the experimental condition received the interventions (iZ HERO exhibition visit and Story Quest gameplay) after the baseline data collection. Mentees’ perceptions regarding the iZ HERO exhibition were positive. The program was successful in improving students’ attitudes toward offline meetings, attitudes toward playing games instead of doing homework, and cyberbullying. Ratings of their mentoring experience were related to positive changes in attitudes. The program did not improve students’ attitude in the other online risky behaviors such as attitudes toward pornography. The results, reasons for its effectiveness, and limitations of the study are discussed. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2015 APA, all rights reserved)

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... Changing the attitudes of children with a Cyberwellness program is suggested in (Liau et al. 2017). iZ HERO Adventure is a practical digital exhibition involving peermentoring using various media in a storytelling mode. ...
... Changing the attitudes of children with a Cyberwellness program is suggested in (Liau et al. 2017). iZ HERO Adventure is a practical digital exhibition involving peermentoring using various media in a storytelling mode. ...
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