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This article provides a review of scientific, peer-reviewed articles that examine the relationship between news sharing and social media in the period from 2004 to 2014. A total of 461 articles were obtained following a literature search in two databases (Communication & Mass Media Complete [CMMC] and ACM), out of which 109 were deemed relevant based on the study’s inclusion criteria. In order to identify general tendencies and to uncover nuanced findings, news sharing research was analyzed both quantitatively and qualitatively. Three central areas of research—news sharing users, content, and networks—were identified and systematically reviewed. In the central concluding section, the results of the review are used to provide a critical diagnosis of current research and suggestions on how to move forward in news sharing research.
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... They exchange knowledge, experiences, hobbies, comments, and video streams in organized ways. Finally, such networking saves people time, lets them interact easily with fewer distribution, and increases awareness among the community members [4]. ...
... It can negatively affect mental health in various ways, including symptoms of anxiety and depression. Additionally, people sometimes cannot find the appropriate community to share the needed knowledge or tips, and this may frustrate them or distract them from their primary goal [4]. Moreover, several problems may arise from conflicts of interest, such as bullying and receiving negative messages. ...
... The experiment shows that the algorithm can be interactive and offers a high level of accuracy. By applying (4) and (5), we get a high accuracy rate of around 90% and an error rate of 10%, which reflects a high performance. ...
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Social media have become a discussion platform for individuals and groups. Hence, users belonging to different groups can communicate together. Positive and negative messages as well as media are circulated between those users. Users can form special groups with people who they already know in real life or meet through social networking after being suggested by the system. In this article, we propose a framework for recommending communities to users based on their preferences; for example, a community for people who are interested in certain sports, art, hobbies, diseases, age, case, and so on. The framework is based on a feature extraction algorithm that utilizes user profiling and combines the cosine similarity measure with term frequency to recommend groups or communities. Once the data is received from the user, the system tracks their behavior, the relationships are identified, and then the system recommends one or more communities based on their preferences. Finally, experimental studies are conducted using a prototype developed to test the proposed framework, and results show the importance of our framework in recommending people to communities.
... As such, news-sharing behaviour on social media demands further empirical investigation, especially with respect to addressing the roles of altruistic democratisation (e.g. civic engagement) and self-serving social influences on the part of focal users (Kümpel, Karnowski, and Keyling 2015). ...
... As a result, even ordinary users and passive receivers of information on social media have a powerful voice in modern society. Thus, news-sharing on social media has become a prominent and significant phenomenon that spans across social, economic, and political boundaries and, therefore, demands further empirical investigation (Kümpel, Karnowski, and Keyling 2015). ...
... These studies have defined news-sharing as a participatory action driven by people's political interests. However, these studies have investigated news-sharing behaviours of social media users in passing (Kümpel, Karnowski, and Keyling 2015). While extremely valuable to the academic understanding of news-sharing phenomena, such studies have largely avoided the investigation of the roles of news content quality, source credibility, perception towards civic engagement, attitude towards newssharing, and dual social influences on users' news-sharing behaviours on social media. ...
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Rising prominence of social media coupled with a myriad of recent developments in the built-in features has allowed users to instantly share news both within and across their social networks, making news-sharing a savvy trend. Additionally, these platforms have enabled users to share news critical to social and civic responsibilities, as well as political news critical to healthy socio-political function. Given the prominence of citizen-driven digital journalism, even ordinary users and passive receivers of information have a powerful voice in modern society, making news-sharing on social media a significant phenomenon spanning across social, economic, and political boundaries. News-sharing behavior on social media demands further empirical investigation, especially with respect to the roles of online civic engagement and social influences. Drawing upon Elaboration Likelihood Model and Social Influence Theory, this study proposes a research model to explore individuals’ news-sharing behavior and validates the proposed research model using empirical data collected by a survey of 513 active social media users. Findings confirm that online news quality, news source credibility, perception of online civic engagement, perceived influence on others, and social influence play a crucial role in users’ news-sharing behaviors. Theoretical and practical implications are discussed in light of these findings.
... Given the significance of political information as a prerequisite to political participation in a democracy (Delli Carpini and Keeter 1996), content published on social media by news media and political actors became a frequent subject of scholarly attention (Kalsnes and Larsson 2018;Kümpel et al. 2015). However, mainly focusing on traditional news media outlets' activity on social media or analyzing original content published by political actors, studies usually neglect an important aspect of political information distribution on social media, namely the sharing of news articles by political actors. ...
... Considering private users, studies find user motivations and user network characteristics to influence sharing behaviors. Importantly, content and context features of shared news items also affect the dissemination process (for an overview, see Kümpel et al. 2015;Karnowski et al. 2018). Adapting the concept of newsworthiness to news sharing determinants, Trilling et al. (2017) suggest that traditional news values are still a guiding principle. ...
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Political actors play an increasingly important role in the dissemination of political information on social media. However, relatively little is known about the mechanisms why specific news items are shared with the support base instead of others. For a timespan between December 2017 and the end of 2018, we combine the analysis of Facebook content from 1,022 politicians associated with 20 political parties from Germany, Spain, and the UK, with an automated content analysis of media coverage from 22 major online news outlets, and survey data in a multilevel binomial regression approach. By comparing news items that have been shared by one or several political parties with news items that have not been shared by any of them, we overcome the selection biases of previous studies in the field of news dissemination. Findings show that a news item's likelihood to be shared by a politician increases (1) if that politician's party is mentioned in the news item, (2) the more salient their party's owned issues are in the news item, and (3) the more party supporters tend to read the news outlet in which the news item is published. We contextualize these findings in light of political actors’ multi-faceted motivations for news sharing on social media and discuss how this process potentially reinforces an information bias that may contribute to the polarization and fragmentation of audiences.
... ence engagement (Kim et al., 2021). Aided by its feature Facebook Live, Facebook's popularity was sharply increased by the algorithms that allow usage of extended devices such as mobile phones that propagate quick access to information and sharing, where viewers would no longer need to be at home watching content on a television set (Hammock, 2017;Kümpel et. al., 2015). With the help of the above literature, the researcher seeks to answer the following question: RQ1-How has the strategy to Livestream COVID-19 program harnessed the audience's right to health information? ...
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This paper explored the role of Botswana television in harnessing the right to health information and social inclusion of women during the COVID-19 pandemic. The researcher sampled 36 episodes (n=36) between March and June 2020 from the Botswana television Facebook page and employed content analysis to examine comments, reactions, viewership patterns, and gender disparities during programming. The program recorded over one million views from its audience, attracting many reactions and comments. However, there was a ratio of 74.5% for males against 25.5% for female representation, which was lower than the half margin of all the guests in the program. Furthermore, the study found that indeed Facebook boosted television viewership and audience engagement, although women's issues were not satisfactorily addressed by the program, both dedicated to gender equality during the pandemic and crafting topics that discussed the vulnerability of women.
... Q2. What are the conceptual trends and lines of research in the field of 'news sharing' (Lee & Ma, 2012;Kümpel et al., 2015;Kalsnes & Larsson, 2018;Apuke & Omar, 2021)? Q3. ...
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This study seeks to establish whether news sharing in social media is a mature field of research by using bibliometrics as a tool. The Web of Science database was searched for articles that contained the term ‘news sharing’ in titles, keywords, and abstracts. A total of 133 articles was obtained, which enabled us to address the question of whether there are well-established journals and authors that cover the subject. The results show a certain ambiguity, which could explain why the chosen subject matter is often studied in fields outside of Communication Studies; however, while studies on news sharing are conducted by researchers from heterogeneous fields, this has not translated into greater interdisciplinarity.
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We examine the determinants and market consequences associated with earnings announcements going viral on social media, a phenomenon we label “earnings virality.” Using a comprehensive panel of historical Twitter data, we find that the typical earnings announcement receives relatively little social media coverage, but others go viral on social media, quickly reaching the feeds of millions of people. We find that viral earnings announcements generally have Twitter content that is more extreme in tone and contains less unique content. Further, earnings virality is positively associated with revenue surprises, investor recognition, retail investor ownership, and retail investor trading around the announcement. Earnings virality appears to be detrimental to markets, as it coincides with lower market liquidity and slower price formation. Overall, our evidence suggests that user-driven dissemination through social media platforms, when amplified and taken to extreme levels, may be harmful to markets.
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Focusing on Turkey, this article analyzes the role of polarization on news users’ perception of misinformation and mistrust in the news on social media. Turkey is one of the countries where citizens complain most about misinformation on the internet. The citizens’ trust in news institutions is also in continuous decline. Furthermore, both Turkish society and its media landscape are politically highly polarized. Focusing on Turkey’s highly polarized environment, the article aims to analyze how political polarization influences the users’ trust in the news and their perceptions about misinformation on social media. The study is based on multi-method research, including focus groups, media diaries, and interviews with people of different ages and socioeconomic backgrounds. The article firstly demonstrates different strategies that the users develop to validate information, including searching for any suspicious information on search engines, looking at the comments below the post, and looking at other news media, especially television. Secondly, we will discuss how more affective mechanisms of news assessment come into prominence while evaluating political news. Although our participants are self-aware and critical about their partisan attitudes in news consumption and evaluation, they also reveal media sources to which they feel politically closer. We propose the concept of “skeptical inertia” to refer to this self-critical yet passive position of the users in the face of the polarized news environment in Turkey.
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Purpose The purpose of the study is threefold: first, to identify what factors influence mobile users' willingness of news learning and sharing, second, to find out whether users' learning in the news platforms will affect their sharing behavior and third, to access the impact of sharing intention on actual sharing behavior on the mobile platform. Design/methodology/approach This study proposes an influence mechanism model for examining the relationship among the factors, news learning and news sharing. The proposed mechanism includes factors at three levels: personal, interpersonal and social level. To achieve this, researchers collected data from 474 mobile news users in China to test the hypotheses. The tools SPSS 26.0 and AMOS 23.0 were used to analysis the reliability, validity, model fits and structural equation modeling (SEM), respectively. Findings The findings indicate that news learning on the mobile platforms is affected by self-efficacy and self-enhancement. And news sharing intention is influenced by self-efficacy, interpersonal trust, interpersonal reciprocity, online community identity and social norms positively. News sharing intention has a significant effect on news sharing behavior, but news learning has an insignificant relationship with new sharing. Originality/value This study provides practical guidelines for mobile platform operators and news media managers by explicating the various factors of users' engagement on the news platforms. This paper also enriches the literature of news learning and news sharing on mobile by the integration of two theories: the social ecology theory and the interpersonal behavior theory.
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