Article

Begonia chingipengii (sect. Baryandra, Begoniaceae), a new species from Luzon Island, Philippines

Authors:
To read the full-text of this research, you can request a copy directly from the authors.

Abstract

Begonia chingipengii from Gabaldon, Nueva Ecija, Luzon Island is described as a new species endemic to the Philippines. This is the latest addition to the newly delimited Begonia section Baryandra. It resembles Begonia trichochila but is distinguished by the variegated leaves with light green veins and midrib contrasting with the dark green adaxial surface and maroon abaxial surface, and its oblique leaf is elongated with an acuminate apex. The robust variegated leaves, large flowers and extensive inflorescence make it very attractive.

No full-text available

Request Full-text Paper PDF

To read the full-text of this research,
you can request a copy directly from the authors.

... Subsequent botanical explorations and taxonomic studies revealed additional diversity of sect. Baryandra across the Philippines (e.g., Rubite et al. 2014, 2018, Tandang et al. 2016, Peng et al. 2017, Magtoto et al. 2018, Calaramo et al. 2019, Pranada et al. 2019, Rule et al. 2020, drastically increasing the section to 78 species up to date onward: https://padme.rbge. org.uk/Begonia/home). ...
... Although chromosome cytology has only been investigated in 16 species of Begonia sect. Baryandra, a great variation in chromosome numbers of 2n=26, 28, 30, 32, 44 and 56 has been reported (Legro and Doorenbos 1969, 1971, Doorenbos et al. 1998, Kokubugata and Madulid 2000, Oginuma and Peng 2002, Hughes et al. 2011, Nakamura et al. 2013, Rubite et al. 2014, Peng et al. 2015a, 2017, suggesting that chromosomal changes could have been the major driving force for the generation of high species diversity in the section. However, because their chromosomes are small and generally short ( 2 µm long), karyotypes of sect. ...
... Among the 20 Asian sections, 2n=28 was reported in three sections: 14 species in sect. Baryandra (Nakamura et al. 2013, Rubite et al. 2014, Peng et al. 2017, one species each in sections Petermannia (Piton 1962) and Reichenheimia (Li et al. 2005). The chromosome number 2n=30, on the other hand, was reported in 86 species of seven sections: 24 species in sect. ...
Article
Begonia sect. Baryandra is distributed mainly in the Philippines with a few species in Borneo and New Guinea. Previous chromosome information of sect. Baryandra has restricted to ca. 16 species and their karyotypes have never been investigated. Here we report the cytological investigations of 26 species of sect. Baryandra, including five karyotype analyses that are the first report in sect. Baryandra, 24 species were reported cytologically for the first time, and two species were re-examined. Incorporating previous and present studies, chromosome numbers of 40 of the 78 species in sect. Baryandra are now available. Except for some intraspecific variant counts of 2n=26 and 44, and a tetraploid number of 2n=56, 39 species have the chromosome number of either 2n=28 or 30. The karyotypic formula of the three investigated species is uniform as 2n=28=10m+18sm(st), and two as 2n=30=8m+22sm(st). Based on molecular phylogenetic relationships, ancestral state reconstruction suggests that 2n=30 is the most likely ancestral chromosome number of sect. Baryandra, with 2n=28 a derived number. Based on our and previous studies, the chromosome evolution in Begonia sect. Baryandra is discussed.
... In continuation of our recent taxonomic studies on Asian Begonia (e.g. Chung et al. 2014;Ding et al. 2014;Lin & Peng 2014, Lin et al. 2014aLin et al. 2015;Nakamura et al. 2013;Peng et al. 2013Peng et al. , 2014aRubite et al. 2013Rubite et al. , 2014, we report the discovery of two new species of Begonia, B. moneta and B. peridoticola, that co-occur on a peridotic (ultramafic) cliff in the Kinabalu National Park at ca. 400 m elevation. The two species belong to different sections, and no sign of natural hybridization was apparent locally. ...
... wingless) capsules. Clustered stomata complexes were observed in B. moneta ( Figure 3C), which are likely the way in which the species copes with periodical drought or fluctuating environment (Hughes et al. 2011;Rubite et al. 2014 Plant monoecious, epipetric, perennial, cane-like. Stem crimson to olive green, 30-50 (−70) cm tall, 3-5 mm thick, glabrous, internodes 1.2-4.5 cm. ...
Article
Full-text available
Mount Kinabalu, reknowned for its high biodiversity and endemism, is a National Park in the State of Sabah on the northern end of the island of Borneo. Every year many visit the higher part of the Kinabalu National Park, while most lowland forests in the Park are under-explored. Two unknown species of Begonia were collected from a peridotic (ultramafic) cliff in the Kinabalu National Park at ca. 400 m elevation. The two species are named B. moneta C.-I Peng, Rimi & C. W. Lin and B. peridoticola Rimi, C.-I Peng & C. W. Lin. Begonia moneta (sect. Baryandra) is similar to B. gueritziana Gibbs, a widespread species of the same section in Borneo, differing in the peltate (vs. basifixed) leaves and the smaller flower parts. Also, their chromosome numbers are different (B. moneta, 2n = 30; B. gueritziana, 2n = 28). The peltate and succulent foliage of B. moneta is also reminiscent of B. burttii Kiew & S. Julia and B. payung S. Julia & Kiew, both of sect. Reichenheimia, from Sarawak. Begonia moneta is distinct from the two species in having branched (vs. entire) placental lamellae. Additionally, B. moneta differs from B. burttii in having 4 (vs. 5) tepals in pistillate flowers and markedly unequal (vs. equal) fruit wings. Begonia moneta differs from B. payung in the smaller leaves and conspicuously winged (vs. wingless) capsules. Begonia peridoticola (sect. Petermannia) resembles B. punchak Kiew & S. Julia from limestone areas in Kuching Division, Sarawak, differing in the entire leaf margin (vs. distantly dentate), much larger capsular wings (8–11 mm vs. 2–3 mm wide) and yellow, spiral (vs. crimson, U-shaped) styles. A careful study of the herbarium materials and literature supports the recognition of the two new species. Detailed descriptions, line drawings, color plates, chromsome data, foliar SEM observations and comparisons with phenetically similar species are provided to aid in identification.
... To honor his remarkable achievements, a total of 9 plant species were named after Ching-I Peng (Table 1), including Begonia pengii S.M. Ku and Yan Liu (Ku et al. 2008; Fig. 9), B. chingipengii Rubite (Rubite et al. 2014), and B. pengchingii Phutthai and M.Hughes (Phuttai and Hughes 2017). Toward his retirement, Dr. Peng's outstanding academic career was recognized by the 2009 Outstanding Alumnus Award of the Department of Life Sciences, National Chung Hsing University and the 2016 Lifetime Achievement Award of the Taiwan Society of Plant Systematics (TSPS). ...
Article
Full-text available
Ching-I Peng, the most prolific and internationally recognized Taiwanese plant taxonomist of his generation, passed away on May 1, 2018. Dr. Peng was an eminent worker on the taxonomy of East Asian plants and the genus Ludwigia, and the foremost expert on Asian Begonia. He served as associate editor, co-editor in chief, and editor-in-chief of Botanical Studies and its predecessor Botanical Bulletin of Academia Sinica during the period 1992–2016. He gathered over 25,000 plant specimens, name 121 plant taxa, and has left a remarkable legacy of literature, collaborations and collections. This article summarizes Dr. Peng’s academic career and commemorates his enduring contribution.
... Baryandra, which now includes 65 species. The present distribution of this species strongly supports the theory of Rubite et al. (2014) that Philippine Begonia tend to be very narrowly endemic, characterised by small populations, and often confined to a particular locality. There are few unresolved Begonia species which are brought to the NUEBG Begonia Conservatory for further research and morphological investigation. ...
Article
Full-text available
Another Begonia is discovered from the northwestern tip of the Island of Luzon, Philippines. Begonia palemlemensis is a vigorous Begonia growing in the tropical montane rainforest of Kalbario Patapat Natural Park in the municipalities of Adams and Pagudpud, Ilocos Norte. The species resembles Begonia droseroides in having a hirsute indumentum. It is named after the mountain where it was first documented, Mt. Palemlem. The new rare Begonia species was discovered during the Biophysical Assessment Monitoring survey commissioned by the Department of Environmental and Natural Resources Region I in 2018. No populations on adjacent mountains were recorded.
... In continuation of our taxonomic and evolutionary studies of Philippine Begonia (Nakamura et al. 2013;Rubite et al. 2013Rubite et al. , 2014Rubite et al. , 2015Hughes et al. 2015;Tandang et al. 2016;Peng et al. 2017), we document novelties of Begonia on Panay, the sixth largest island of the Philippine Archipelago. Elmer Merrill was the first to explore Begonia in Panay Island, describing six new species, B. collisiae Merr., B. lancilimba Merr., B. obtusifolia Merr., B. panayensis Merr., B. rubrifolia Merr., and B. serpens Merr. ...
Article
Full-text available
Background The flora of Panay Island is under-collected compared with the other islands of the Philippines. In a joint expedition to the island, botanists from Taiwan and the Philippines found three unknown Begonia species and compared them with potentially allied species. Results The three species are clearly assignable to Begonia sect. Baryandra which is largely endemic to the Philippines. Studies of literature, herbarium specimens, and living plants support the recognition of the three new species: Begonia culasiensis, B. merrilliana, and B. sykakiengii. Somatic chromosomes at metaphase were determined to be 2n = 30 for B. culasiensis and 2n = 28 for both B. merrilliana and B. sykakiengii, congruent with those of most species in sect. Baryandra. Molecular phylogenetic evidence is consistent with B. culasiensis being a relict from the late Miocene and B. merrilliana and B. sykakiengii being younger species of Pleistocene origin. Conclusion The continuing discovery of endemic Philippine species means the remaining fragments of both primary and secondary native vegetation in the archipelago are of increasing value in terms of natural capital. A secure future for the species could be realized through ex situ conservation collections and raising awareness with community groups.
... Both Begonia guixiensis and B. cylindrica have clustered stomata and hypodermis (Figures D, E, G, H). These characters were also seen in B. leprosa : figure nine-H, I), the most closely related species in the phylogeny (Figure 1), and are known in a number of limestone Begonia species from the Philippines and China Rubite et al. 2014). ...
Article
Full-text available
In our recent molecular phylogenetic study of Asian Begonia, two undescribed species, B. guixiensis sp. ined. (S. Guangxi, China) and B. longa sp. ined. (Vietnam), were sampled and placed within the strongly supported clade composed of Begonia sect. Coelocentrum and other co-distributed rhizomatous species in the Sino-Vietnamese limestone karsts. While Begonia sect. Coelocentrum has been recircumscribed based on the phylogenetic relationships, B. guixiensis sp. ined. and B. longa sp. ined. remain illegitimate names. In continuation of our studies in Asian Begonia, these two new species are described and illustrated. Begonia guixiensis resembles B. cylindrica in the peltate, subcoriaceous leaves, differing by the shape of ovary/fruit and the type of placentation. In aspect, B. longa bears a superficial resemblance to B. brevipedunculata in leaf shape in particular, differing by many other features such as the long internodes, shorter petioles and smaller leaves, longer peduncles and 3-locular ovary. The chromosome number of both new species is determined as 2n = 30. A careful study of the literature, herbarium specimens and living plants, both in the wild and in cultivation in the experimental greenhouse, support the recognition of the two new species, which are described and illustrated herein.
... Both Begonia guixiensis and B. cylindrica have clustered stomata and hypodermis (Figures D, E, G, H). These characters were also seen in B. leprosa : figure nine-H, I), the most closely related species in the phylogeny (Figure 1), and are known in a number of limestone Begonia species from the Philippines and China Rubite et al. 2014). ...
Article
Full-text available
In our recent molecular phylogenetic study of Asian Begonia, two undescribed species, B. guixiensis sp. ined. (S. Guangxi, China) and B. longa sp. ined. (Vietnam), were sampled and placed within the strongly supported clade composed of Begonia sect. Coelocentrum and other co-distributed rhizomatous species in the Sino-Vietnamese limestone karsts. While Begonia sect. Coelocentrum has been recircumscribed based on the phylogenetic relationships, B. guixiensis sp. ined. and B. longa sp. ined. remain illegitimate names. In continuation of our studies in Asian Begonia, these two new species are described and illustrated.Results Begonia guixiensis resembles B. cylindrica in the peltate, subcoriaceous leaves, differing by the shape of ovary/fruit and the type of placentation. In aspect, B. longa bears a superficial resemblance to B. brevipedunculata in leaf shape in particular, differing by many other features such as the long internodes, shorter petioles and smaller leaves, longer peduncles and 3-locular ovary. The chromosome number of both new species is determined as 2n?=?30.ConclusionA careful study of the literature, herbarium specimens and living plants, both in the wild and in cultivation in the experimental greenhouse, support the recognition of the two new species, which are described and illustrated herein.
Article
Full-text available
Cytological data resources are crucial to the study and understanding of the evolution of complex taxa. Recent research on the genus Begonia L. has provided a robust phylogenetic background for the analysis of evolutionary patterns across the group and has established that Begonia is variable in genome size and chromosome number. This paper provides an overview of the genome structural variation present in Begonia and an updated chromosome number and genome size dataset for the genus. Chromosome numbers of more than 400 species are presented and discussed within their current taxonomic and phylogenetic context. A more complete chromosome number dataset is available for Neotropical and Asian Begonia sections than for those from Africa. The distribution of chromosome numbers across phylogenetic trees supports the idea of Begonia sections as natural groups, because most variation is found between sections rather than within them. Some larger Begonia clades were found to have larger chromosome number variation. Moreover, groups with the most variable chromosome numbers belong to some of the taxonomically complex or unresolved Begonia sections. Genome size variation was found not to correlate with changes in chromosome number. It suggests that Begonia genome dynamics are caused not only by large-scale duplications, rearrangements, and changes in ploidy levels but also by changes in the repetitive fraction of the genome, which probably cause changes in chromosome size. This could potentially play an important role in species radiations.
Article
Previous chromosome information is restricted to 13 species in the Asian Begonia sect. Diploclinium. Here we present the first chromosome counts of three species, as well as confirmed their chromosome numbers of five species. Among three species investigated for the first time, the chromosome number of 2n=18 and 2n=32 are new counts in the section. Additionally, we provide the karyotypes of eight species for the first time. Among ca. 135 species in sect. Diploclinium, chromosome numbers of 16 species are available together with the present and previous reports. Among 16 species, they show diverse chromosome numbers with 2n=18, 22, 24, 26, 30, 32, 36, 46, and 54. B. wenshanensis with 2n=18 is the lowest chromosome number in the section and the third lowest chromosome number in Begonia. We suggest that B. coptidimontana with 2n=32 is tetraploid origin with the basic chromosome number of x=8. We discussed the chromosome evolution in Begonia sect. Diploclinium.
Article
Full-text available
The pantropically distributed Begonia (Begoniaceae) is one of the most species-rich genera. Philippines is one of the diversity centers of Southeast Asian Begonia. In our 2012 field survey, three species of Begonia section Petermannia were collected in Barangay Sagubo, Municipality of Kapangan, Province of Benguet in the northern Luzon Island, Philippines. Our study on literatures and herbarium specimens suggests that these collections consist of B. crispipila, an unknown new species hereby we named B. balangcodiae, and the natural hybrid between them. Molecular analyses confirm that the former contributed the maternal genome while the latter provided the paternal genome. We name the natural hybrid B. × kapangan, which is the first natural hybrid reported in sect. Petermannia.
Article
Full-text available
Begonia chongzuoensis Yan Liu, S. M. Ku & C.-I Peng (sect. Coelocentrum), a new species from Guangxi Zhuangzu Autonomous Region, China, is here described and illustrated. A somatic chromosome number of 2n = 30 was determined. Begonia chongzuoensis somewhat resembles B. obliquifolia S. H. Huang & Y. M. Shui, from which it differs by the moderately to sparsely setulose leaf surface; glabrous inflorescences, flowers and fruits; and crescent-shaped abaxial wing of the fruit. The new species is known only from a limestone hill in western Guangxi.
Article
Full-text available
Background: Begonia sect. Diploclinium is a ‘dust-bin’ section for species retaining pleisiomorphic characters and lacking novel synapomorphic characters used to delimit other Asian sections in Begonia. Part of this large and polymorphous section is transferred to Begonia sect. Baryandra in a move towards a more natural classification for the genus. Results: Phylogenetic analysis of nuclear ribosomal ITS DNA sequences show a strongly supported monophyletic group containing Philippine and Bornean species previously in Begonia sect. Diploclinium, and the type of Begonia sect. Baryandra, B. oxysperma. This clade forms the basis for the now much-expanded Begonia sect. Baryandra, which as defined here contains 49 species and has its centre of diversity in the Philippines. Conclusions: A natural classification for a much expanded Begonia sect. Baryandra has been provided. This paper highlights the feasibility of moving towards a natural classification of Asian Begonia step by step as information comes to light through building upon previous framework phylogenies with denser sampling. Keywords: Begonia; Classification; Section; Phylogeny; Taxonomy
Article
Full-text available
A new species of Begonia in sect. Diploclinium, B. blancii M. Hughes & C.-I Peng, is described from the Bulalakaw Falls area in Palawan. A somatic chromosome number of 2n = 30 was determined. Begonia blancii is allied to B. suborbiculata and other 2-locular species in Begonia sect. Diploclinium, but is very distinct in having triangular-spathulate leaves. It shares clustered stomata with a number of other Begonia species, which are likely to help it reduce water loss through transpiration during the dry season. Its IUCN status is considered to be Least Concern.
Article
Full-text available
A new natural hybrid, Begonia ×breviscapa C.-I Peng, Yan Liu & S. M. Ku, from northwestern Guangxi, China, is described and illustrated. A somatic chromosome number of 2n = 30 was determined. Based on morphological features, geographical range, pollen stainability and seed set we conclude that B. ×breviscapa is a natural hybrid between B. variifolia Y. M. Shui & W. H. Chen [sect. Coelocentrum Irmsch.] and B. leprosa Hance [sect. Leprosae (T. C. Ku) Y. M. Shui]. This is the first documentation of natural hybridization between begonias of two different sections in mainland China.
Article
We describe Begonia tandangii, a new species of Begonia sect. Baryandra from the Sierra Madre Mountain Range of Luzon Island, the Philippines. Begonia tandangii has a close resemblance to B. fenicis in gross morphology, differing in having leaf margin sparsely fringed with minute hairs (vs. glabrous or with minute hairs only on teeth) and capsules with broadly-ovate outline and an acuminate apex (vs. capsules with broadly-obovate outline and a rounded to truncate apex). Phylogenetic analyses of Philippines species of sect. Baryandra based on ITS sequences revealed that B. tandangii was clearly separated from B. fenicis. Begonia tandangii is currently known only from the type locality in a coastal forest of Baler, Aurora Province, which is in the neighborhood of Aurora Memorial National Park.
Article
The somatic chromosome numbers are presented of 90 Begonia spp. of African, Asian and American origin, including a few of those previously listed [see H.A., 40: 1600] whose nomenclature or chromosome numbers are reconsidered. Sixteen different numbers were found, ranging between 16 and 76. The most common were 28 (26 species), 38 (10 species) and 56 (15 species). [For related work see H.A., 41: 7120.]. (Abstract retrieved from CAB Abstracts by CABI’s permission)
Article
"Stomatal clustering," an abnormal stomatal patterning that is formed by two or more stomata in the leaf epidermis, has been reported in more than 60 species of terrestrial plants. According to the characters and distributional pattern, two different types of stomatal clusters were identified, However, calculation of R-values in 16 different plant species showed that the classical method in spatial ecology study could not distinguish between these two types of clusters. Therefore, to classify them, the term "contiguous cluster" and "non-contiguous cluster" were introduced. Their formation and ecological significance were also discussed. In order to study whether stomatal clustering occurs in response to the environment, Vicia faba L. were cultivated under different water/salinity levels. Epidermis bioassay was conducted 2 weeks after the treatment. The results showed that drought and salt stresses significantly increased the stomatal density and stomatal index. More importantly, the occurrences of contiguous stomatal clustering also raised along the drought/salt gradients. The result suggests that the stomatal clustering is correlated with environmental signals. It could serve as a new marker for environmental adaptation in terrestrial plants.
Article
N the inorphologic identification of chromosomes, the location of the I centromere is the most useful landmark, and one which is characterized by great constancy. It would seem that not much could be added to the definitions by E. B. WILSON (1928) of the locations on the chromosome of the centrornere or, in the terminology of that time, the spindle attachment: “Attachment of the chromosome to the spindle is commonly limited to a small area, and is of two general types, namely: (1) terminnl or telomitic and (2) non-ferminal or atelomitic, being in the former case at one end, and in the latter at some other point or points. Non-terminal attachment may be at the middle point (median) or at an intermediate point (submedian, sub-terminal). All gradations exist between these various cases;” (I.c., p. 130-131). In the acconipanying picture (l.c., Fig. 56, p. 132), here reprinted as Fig. l., the four locations of median, submedian, subterminal and terminal are represented, and, in addition, “lateral”, which corresponds to the modern term “diffuse centromere”. Nevertheless, at the present time, with the immense increase in research activity in mammalian cytology, the terminology of the centromeric position has become burdened by much obscurity and confusion. One cause of confusion is that different authors, and even the same author on different occasions, have used the terms median, submedian etc. with great amplitude, and it is often difficult to know in a specific case what each term signifies. Another cause of confusion is that a set of terms for chromosomes with specific centromeric positions, such as metacentric, acrocentric, telocentric, have come into wide usage without being clearly defined in relation to the positional terms median, submedian, subterminal and terminal. During the spring of 1963 the present writers exchanged epistolary
Article
The karyomorphology of all 14 species of Taiwanese Begonia was investigated to elucidate their chromosome features and chromosomal evolution. Among all species investigated, differences in chromosome features are found in: (1) chromosome number 2 n = 22, 26, 36, 38, 52, 60, 64, 82, and (2) frequencies of chromosomes with secondary, tertiary, and/or small constrictions of polyploids, ranging from 23% to 63%, which is higher than the expected value of about 9%. It is suggested that after polyploidization from the diploid species (i.e., 2 n = 22 and frequencies of chromosomes with secondary, tertiary, and/or small constrictions of polyploids of about 9%), chromosome translocations occurred, followed by a decrease in chromosome number, and subsequently stabilized genomes were formed in various species in Taiwan. The karyomorphological evidence also suggested that the chromosome morphology has evolved in parallel in the begonias belonging to different sections in Taiwan. The variation in chromosomal features is more complex than the variation in floral and fruit morphologies. Karyomorphological data also supports the recognition of five new species in Taiwan: Begonia bouffordii, B. chuyunshanensis, B. pinglinensis, B. tengchiana, and B. wutaiana. Based on detailed karyomorphological analyses, the taxonomic implications, speciation, and chromosomal evolution in Taiwanese Begoniaare discussed.
de (1859) Mémoire sur la familia des Bégoniacées
  • A Candolle
Candolle, A. de (1859) Mémoire sur la familia des Bégoniacées. Annales des Sciences Naturelles. Botanique Ser. 4, 11: 93–149.
  • J Golding
  • D C Wasshausen
Golding, J. & Wasshausen, D.C. (2002) Begoniaceae. 2nd ed. Smithsonian Institution Contributions from the United States National Herbarium 43: 1-289.
Three new Chinese Begonias
  • H F Hance
Hance, H.F. (1883) Three new Chinese Begonias. Journal of Botany, British and Foreign 21: 202-203.
An Annotated Checklist of Southeast Asian Begonia
  • M Hughes
Hughes, M. (2008) An Annotated Checklist of Southeast Asian Begonia. Royal Botanic Garden Edinburgh, Edinburgh, 164 pp.
1855) Begoniaceen-Gattungen und Arten
  • J F Klotzsch
Klotzsch, J.F. (1855) Begoniaceen-Gattungen und Arten. Abhandlungen der Königlischen Akadamie der Wissenschaften Berlin. 135 pp + 12 plates.
Chromosomal study of four plant-taxa in Batan Island, the Philippines and the Yaeyama Group
  • G Kokubugata
  • D A Madulid
Kokubugata, G. & Madulid, D.A. (2000) Chromosomal study of four plant-taxa in Batan Island, the Philippines and the Yaeyama Group, Ryukyu Islands, Japan. National Science Museum Monographs 18: 139-144.
Additions to our knowledge of the Flora of Hainan
  • H L Li
Li, H.L. (1944) Additions to our knowledge of the Flora of Hainan. Journal of the Arnold Arboretum 25: 206-214.
(1753) Species Plantarum. Imprensis Laurentii Salvii, Homiae
  • C Linnaeus
Linnaeus, C. (1753) Species Plantarum. Imprensis Laurentii Salvii, Homiae. 1200 pp.
Fragmenta Florae Philippinae: contributions to the flora of the Philippine Islands
  • J R Perkins
Perkins, J.R. (1904) Fragmenta Florae Philippinae: contributions to the flora of the Philippine Islands. Fasc. 1-3. Gebrüder Borntraeger, Leipzig. 212 pp + 4 plates. http://dx.doi.org/10.5962/bhl.title.10928
Delimitation of Begonia L. sections Diploclinium and Baryandra (Begoniaceae) in the Philippines
  • R R Rubite
Rubite, R.R. (2012) Delimitation of Begonia L. sections Diploclinium and Baryandra (Begoniaceae) in the Philippines. Asia Life Sciences 21: 363-373.
Begonias, Cultivation, Identification and Natural History
  • M C Tebbitt
Tebbitt, M.C. (2005) Begonias, Cultivation, Identification and Natural History. Timber Press, Oregon. 272 pp. Wight, R. (1852) Icones plantarum Indiae Orientalis. Franck & Co., Madras. 35 pp + 299 plates. http://dx.doi.org/10.5962/bhl.title.92
Icones plantarum Indiae Orientalis. Franck & Co., Madras. 35 pp + 299 plates
  • R Wight
Wight, R. (1852) Icones plantarum Indiae Orientalis. Franck & Co., Madras. 35 pp + 299 plates. http://dx.doi.org/10.5962/bhl.title.92
New taxa of the Begonia L. (Begoniaceae) from China
  • C.-Y Wu
Wu, C.-Y. (1995) New taxa of the Begonia L. (Begoniaceae) from China. Acta Phytotaxonomica Sinica 33: 251-280.
Mémoire sur la familia des Bégoniacées
  • A Candolle
  • De
Candolle, A. de (1859) Mémoire sur la familia des Bégoniacées. Annales des Sciences Naturelles. Botanique Ser. 4, 11: 93-149.
On a collection of plants from the Batanes and Babuyanes Islands
  • E D Merrill
Merrill, E.D. (1908) On a collection of plants from the Batanes and Babuyanes Islands. Philippine Journal of Science, section C, Botany 3: 385-442.
  • C.-I Peng
  • Y Liu
  • S.-M Ku
  • Y Kono
  • K.-F Chung
Peng, C.-I., Liu, Y., Ku, S.-M., Kono, Y. & Chung, K.-F. (2010) Begonia × breviscapa (Begoniaceae), a new intersectional natural hybrid from limestone areas in Guangxi, China. Botanical Studies 51: 107-117.