Article

Eurocodes– Overcoming the barriers to global adoption

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Abstract

In 2010 the Eurocodes replaced the equivalent national structural design standards in the European Union (EU) member states. They are claimed to be the most technically advanced structural codes in the world and are intended to provide global access to designers. Many non-EU countries with historical connections to the UK are now adopting Eurocodes, though this is primarily due to previously adopted British standards being withdrawn. Unfortunately, adoption outside Europe is proving challenging as it may not be possible to source construction products complying to European product standards listed in Eurocodes. Designers outside Europe are thus faced with the dilemma of identifying what local products and structures can be deemed equivalent, and whether the magnitudes of the partial factors recommended by Eurocodes remain valid. Using steel construction as an example, this paper describes the different approaches that are being used in the Asia-Pacific region and identifies what resources are required to support the EU’s aim of increasing international trade and competitiveness.

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... Secondly, Eurocodes are also claimed to be the most technically advanced structural codes in the world and are proposed to provide worldwide access to designers and mostly adopted in countries that having historical relations with UK [21]. At the same time, the Chinese companies working on international projects also use them as a reference [22]. ...
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