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Food labels and the environment: Towards harmonization of EU and US organic standards

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... TSRs may be granted special status by nation-states, or they may be an entirely private form of governance, subject to state laws about contracts, fraud, and so forth, but not the subject of any special legislation. (Busch 2011, 221) In the case of organic agriculture, public authorities-European ones in this case -occupy a central position (Winickoff and Klein 2011;Arcuri 2015). ...
... Although the EU has set up its standards 10 years earlier, the US and the EU regulatory regimes are very similar and tend to converge(Winickoff and Klein 2011;Arcuri 2015) and examples from the US might fit our demonstration in a similar way. A comparison between the two cases could certainly be an argument for another paper, but due to space constraints, we focus mainly on the global level from the EU entry point. ...
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